The World and I

World and I is an encyclopedic journal that includes world news; developments in science, the arts and philosophy; book reviews; and photo essays. Since it was founded in 1986, it is printed monthly. The journal is published by Washington Times Corp.Subjects for World and I include science; literature and literary reviews; food and cooking; art; travel and tourism; politics; philosophy; music and musical instruments; drama and theatre. The editor is Steve Osmond.

Articles from Vol. 18, No. 10, October

A Livable Wage
Elaine McCrate has an interesting analysis in Current Issues with respect to the minimum wage. She believes that the cost in terms of jobs of a livable wage would be outweighed by other social and economic benefits. This is a serious issue. It is...
America's Fascination with Firearms
The rigors of the country's frontier and the lack of a gun-restricting nobility led to the proliferation of firearms and a deeply ingrained pro-gun culture. Unlike most of the world's people, many Americans view the possession of firearms as the...
Angel of Mercy
From the soil of Donald Stephens' family anguish sprouted a project that has brought healing to hundreds of thousands of the world's destitute and sick. The birth of Mercy Ships, an organization that runs a fleet of three hospital ships that make...
An Indian Girlhood : A Child's-Eye View of Family Life Is Enlivened by Tales of Terror and Enchantment
Edward Hower's eight books include his latest novel, A Garden of Demons, and The Pomegranate Princess, a volume of folktales he collected while on Fulbright grants in India. He has also received fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts,...
A Secret Too Good to Keep
Possibly our most undercelebrated writer, Thomas Berger is a novelist whose work is widely respected by critics but whose stunning achievements continue to elude the notice they deserve. Brooks Landon is professor and chair in the English department...
A Secret Too Good to Keep : Thomas Berger Profile
Thomas Berger's book-jacket photo has remained the same since the mid- seventies, although it has been ever more tightly cropped, revealing finally not much more than a striking shaved head, penetrating eyes, large nose, and cleft chin--easily the...
Bard of the Blue Ridge
A spirited Virginia company is bringing Shakespeare home to a newly constructed Elizabethan playhouse and inviting theatergoers to explore the immortal playwright largely on his own terms. In the prologue to Henry V, Shakespeare forthrightly confronted...
Bard of the Blue Ridge : Shakespeare for Students
Shakespeare has long been a fixture in high school and college classrooms, too often a laborious one for indifferent students. Shenandoah Shakespeare has a different view and has invested disproportionately large resources, for a theater company, to...
Budding Relationships
Kennedy clan member anthony shriver's best buddies program pairs the intellectually disabled with volunteers who offer them one-to-one friendship and increased social integration. "We get along like sisters," says 28-year-old Jennifer Toth of her...
Doing the Best They Can : Mayhem and Mirth in the Baseball Umpires' World
Around the turn of the twentieth century, baseball fans considered the abuse and assault of umpires a part of the game. Umpires were routinely cursed, threatened, and mauled on and off the field; two were even killed. Indeed, during the 1886 baseball...
Doing the Best They Can : The World Series
A true baseball fan is a person of two minds. One appreciates the various aspects of a game: a no-hitter being carried into the seventh inning; a batter with a homer, single, and double, only needing a triple (the hardest hit to get) to complete the...
Doing the Best They Can : Umpires in Cooperstown
####Jack Connelly and WILLIAM S. CONNERY William S. Connery is Current Issues editor at The World & I. Since 1939, only eight umpires have been deemed fit to enter the Baseball Hall of Fame. No umpires were elected to the hall until 1953,...
Education and the Brain
The article by Elaine Johnson in the Natural Science section on how the brain operates is related in significant ways to the educational process. One important scientific finding is that the structure and development of the human brain are influenced...
Eternal Albania : One of Europe's Finest Writers Shows Us How to Awake from the Nightmare of History
Lee Congdon writes regularly on modern literature. He teaches eastern European history at James Madison University. Book Info:SPRING FLOWERS, SPRING FROST Ismail Kadare Translated by David Bellos Publisher:New York: Arcade Publishing,...
From This Month's Menu
Science and technology have shaped our lives and those of our ancestors in ever-expanding ways during the past two centuries. Science has changed our understanding of our place in the cosmos. Technology has made life less harsh for many of us, while...
Gardens of Healing and Tansformation
Diane Dreher is professor of English and associate dean of Arts and Sciences at Santa Clara University in California. Her publications include Inner Gardening (Harper collins Quill, 2002), The Tao of Inner Peace (HarperCollins, 1981), The Tao of Personal...
Green Oil from Pressure-Cooked Wastes
Using water, heat, and pressure, the thermal depolymerization process converts a wide variety of organic wastes, such as offal from a turkey processing plant, into clean fuels and specialty chemicals. Garbage in, valuable commodities out. Literally,...
Guns and the Law
The preponderance of scholarly and legal opinion concludes that the Second Amendment supports the right of the people to keep and bear arms. Even though many constitutional scholars look askance upon guns, the great majority agree the Second Amendment...
Guns and the Law : How Good Are Guns?
From watching Westerns on television to dressing up as cowboys for Halloween, generations of Americans grew up with a fascination for guns. But just an ocean away, Europeans look at America's gun culture with confusion and disdain. How did such different...
Guns, Crime, and Health
Cross-country comparisons suggest that guns deter crime, and data show that accidental juvenile gun deaths are only a third as frequent as drownings of children in bathtubs. Firearms stir fear. Guns, after all, make it easier for people to commit...
Hamburgers Really Eat Fish
Although the german city of hamburg gave birth to the humble hamburger, citizens of europe's second-largest port town really do eat a lot of fish. "What should I eat in Hamburg?" I asked the German fellow sitting next to me, as we sipped champagne...
IDENTITY THEFT : A Crime of Modern Times
Sunil Dutta is a sergeant with the Los Angeles Police Department. As soon as police officers learn of an armed robbery or burglary in progress on the radio, their adrenaline starts pumping and they speed to the location, willing to put their lives...
International Intervention in Liberia
Turn taylor in UNITED STATES--This is the moment for President Bush to act. With all of his preconditions now met, Mr. Bush should order the American troops parked on ships offshore to join the Nigerian peacekeeping forces already taking up positions...
In Touch with the Tides : Canadian Glassblower Jon Sawyer
Veteran artist Jon Sawyer is capturing icons of New Brunswick's Bay of Fundy in his lustrous work; as the only full-time glassblower east of Quebec, he has become something of an icon himself. Jon Sawyer lives on the edge. Not only does the New...
It's the Architecture, Stupid!
Environmentalists, industry, and the national government all need to open their eyes and realize who really holds the key to moderating the human impact on global climate. How do we dramatically cut down on greenhouse gas emissions, lessen our dependence...
Jazz Montreal
Bobby McFerrin, Joe Zawinul, Foday Musa Suso, Jack DeJohnette--the Montreal International Jazz Festival has it all. Music festivals have a life of their own; they are as much a social phenomenon as a concert-going experience. The best festivals...
Losing Iraq by Failing to Rebuild It
In March 2003, the United States declared war on Iraq because of Baghdad's refusal to comply with UN weapons inspections. The goal of the war was to remove Iraqi President Saddam Hussein from power and precipitate a pro- market, pro-democracy "regime...
Mexican Folk Artists : Trees of Life
The Tree of Life, a familiar archetype, is rooted in cultures all over the world. The biblical story says that the Garden of Eden contained "the tree of life also in the midst of the garden, and the tree of knowledge of good and evil." A common representation...
Minimum Wage or 'Living' Wage?
In March 1997, as many as 7,600 workers in Los Angeles got pay raises under the city's new living wage law. Mandatory for companies that got contracts or financial assistance from the city, the Los Angeles ordinance set a minimum wage for covered workers...
Passion and Ideas : A Profile of George Eliot
Cynthia Grenier is contributing editor to the Arts section of The World & I. She was born Mary Ann Evans on November 22, 1819, in a small farmhouse in Warwickshire, England. Six months earlier, Princess Alexandria Victoria had come into the...
Pro-Choice Tilt?
Last March 13 was an important day in the history of U.S. abortion policy. After three bills banning partial-birth abortion were vetoed in the Clinton years, the Senate passed a ban that President Bush would sign. The network news that evening didn't...
Service Learning Stimulates the Brain
The latest results of brain research support the value of an educational strategy that integrates carefully designed community service projects with the academic curriculum. Mark, a sophomore in an alternative high school in Oregon, was designated...
Service Learning Stimulates the Brain : Connections for Communications and Memory
In our nervous system, each neuron (nerve cell) consists of three parts: a main structure called the cell body; a number of short, branchlike fibers called dendrites; and a long, cablelike protrusion called an axon, which splits near its tip into many...
Sweet Logs Save Forests
Marrying an old solution with an old problem, a community development specialist in El Salvador has discovered a simple way to make high-quality fuel from sugarcane processing wastes. The machine that would prove a godsend to the people of Colima,...
The Beginning of Electronic Warfare : Piercing the Iron Curtain
Charles E. Ruckstuhl spent the war years at MIT and on the high seas as a research associate in antisubmarine warfare. He worked for the Bendix Corporation for twenty years before forming his own company. He is now retired and writes for newspapers....
The Indispensable Nexus : Pennsylvania's Contribution to the Lewis and Clark Expedition
The Lewis and Clark Expedition is renowned as "one of our nation's grandest journeys of exploration." It is commonly believed to be a singularly western event. Less popularly known is the fact that Pennsylvania figured significantly on several levels...
Where They're Going : Tampere Is Finland's Industrial Heart
In the Helsinki airport cafe, as I was waiting to leave Finland, I witnessed an elderly man and his wife selecting a table. They put their coats on an empty chair, arranged their luggage nearby, and set down their coffee cups and plates with pastries....