The World and I

World and I is an encyclopedic journal that includes world news; developments in science, the arts and philosophy; book reviews; and photo essays. Since it was founded in 1986, it is printed monthly. The journal is published by Washington Times Corp.Subjects for World and I include science; literature and literary reviews; food and cooking; art; travel and tourism; politics; philosophy; music and musical instruments; drama and theatre. The editor is Steve Osmond.

Articles from Vol. 18, No. 12, December

A Flying Heavyweight
Once a common sight on European farmlands, the handsome great bustard is now one of the most endangered species in the world. It is wintertime in Austria. Peering through his telescope, Rainer Raab scans the fields of Marchfeld, an agricultural...
African Islamism, from Below
William Miles is professor of political science at Northeastern University in Boston. He was last in Hausaland thanks to the American Philosophical Society. Not even my village friends thought I would still come. Only six weeks after the September...
Arnold Terminates Davis : An Encouraging Start
UNITED STATES--Arnold Schwarzenegger moved quickly and astutely [Oct. 8] to get his transition machinery running. One of his first calls was to prickly and often profane state Senate President John Burton (D-San Francisco), who had not minced words...
Christmas Chestnuts : From Peasant Food to a Holiday Chestnut Cake, These Nuts Contribute to the Italian Way of Life
To me, chestnuts are synonymous with Christmas. In the city, vendors warm their hands over kettle fires as the chestnuts crackle and pop, their bracing, smoky aroma enough to banish the chill in the air. And who can make it past December without belting...
Creating Penitents in Penitentiaries
The word penitentiary (a place for repentance) possesses strong religious implications, referring especially to the possibility of redemption. This month's Special Report will examine how the prison systems work (or don't work) in present-day secular...
Eden in the Valley : The Armenian Community in Fresno
Bordered on the east and west by the mighty Sierra Nevadas and the coastal hills, California's San Joaquin Valley is the country's breadbasket. Here, in the vast central areas of the state, a bounty of crops is squeezed from arid land made fruitful...
Eden in the Valley : The Diaspora
The Armenian diaspora dates back centuries, to the Ottoman takeover of Constantinople in 1453. At that time, Armenians fled the oppression of the Turks to Russia, Poland, and India. Those who stayed in Constantinople eventually established a prominent...
Fact, Film, and Fantasy : Harry Potter and the Magically Transmuted Country
The movie versions of J.K. Rowling's popular Harry Potter books adhere faithfully to the spirit of the novels, and the locations used in the films are often stories unto themselves. Most moviegoers immediately recognize Big Ben when young Harry and...
Flying with Gravity
Neither a blimp, nor a glider, nor a fuel-propelled airplane, a new aircraft promises to translate gravitational attraction into both lift and forward motion, capture wind energy with a radical new wind turbine, and usher in the era of fuelless flight....
From This Month's Menu
The United States imprisons a higher proportion of its population, by an order of magnitude, than any other developed nation. This "lock them up and throw away the key" penal policy might work fine while the criminal is in jail. But we do not actually...
'Hold off on the Hanging' : Peacemakers Examines the Evidence
The lynch mob is giving way to investigations employing fingerprinting and other forensic techniques, as civilization transforms the Western frontier on USA Network's dramatic series Peacemakers. For someone reared on such shoot-'em-up Western classics...
Illuminating Glory : Flemish Manuscript Painting from the Renaissance
Sometimes small is beautiful, and nowhere is this more evident than in the exquisitely painted manuscript illustrations and decorations from the Flemish Renaissance. Meticulously detailed and brilliantly colored, these gems of portraiture and narrative...
Keeper of the Keys : Frederic Mistral, Noble Poet of Provence
Timothy Rake teaches French language and literature and writes from Eugene, Oregon. He who keeps his native tongue, keeps the keys that deliver him from bondage. --Frederic Mistral On the Place des Carmes in Avignon, France, enormous plane...
Keeper of the Keys : Paradise Lost?
The story is as old as creation. Adam and Eve are chased from the Garden of Eden. The world will never be the same. And yet, banished to the edge of paradise, the forlorn poet pines for yesterday's universe. So John Milton wrote his epic, Paradise...
Medical Mechanic
Earl E. Bakken made a better pacemaker, founded and led a major medical technology company, and is leading the merger of high-tech and high-touch medicine in Hawaii. Fascinated from childhood with all things related to electricity, Earl E. Bakken,...
Off the Beaten Path in Tunisia : For the Traveler Willing to Venture beyond the Usual Tourist Destinations, le Kef Offers an Enticing Glimpse of Tunisia's Multicultural Heritage
Suddenly, there it was. We had just come around the side of a gentle hill, on a gradual incline, when the town of Le Kef and its casbah, or citadel, came into view. Crowning the southern end of a rocky ridge, the stone walls both dominated and protected...
'Pervasively Sectarian'
Gerard V. Bradley is professor of Law at Notre Dame Law School. Since 1971 the Supreme Court has struck down many laws that provided public funds to religious schools. A necessary premise of every ruling was the Court's characterization of the aided...
Pioneer in Aging Theory
A series of seeming "accidents" along the road of life propelled Dr. Denham Harman to acquire 35 chemistry patents, propound today's best-known theory of aging (some say his free-radical hypothesis deserves a Nobel Prize), and offer a theory and cure...
Prison Programs That Produce : Religion Was Important in Efforts to Rehabilitate Criminals in the Eighteenth and Nineteenth Centuries. It Is Now Considered a New Method of Altering the Careers of Chronic Offenders
In 1974, criminal rehabilitation programs were no longer seen as effective vehicles for reducing recidivism. Most research evaluations of a wide variety of programs indicated meager or no results in reducing the number of convicts returning to prison....
Rehabilitating Rehabilitation : One Reason Why Prisons Are Failing to Rehabilitate Inmates Is That Rehabilitation Seeks to Improve the Character of Offenders While Most Prisons Degrade Prisoners
Rehabilitation is one of four reasons that can be given in response to the question "Why punish?" Rehabilitation justifies punishment as necessary for the reformation of offenders, that is, for changing their characters so they will conform to the...
Slipping into the Sea : Last Days of the Arctic Community Shishmaref
It's unseasonably warm for a midwinter day: around 7 degrees Fahrenheit or minus 14 Centigrade. You might think that the warmth would be welcome, but for the 600 Inupiaq Eskimos living in Shishmaref, an Alaskan Arctic community where the surrounding...
The British Museum at 250
The world's oldest national public museum celebrates two and a half centuries of existence with an enlightening series of commemorative exhibitions and beautiful architectural innovations. On my first visit to the British Museum in London nearly...
'The Colonel's Got My Back'
O'rya Hyde-Keller is a freelance writer living in Madison, Wisconsin. She's written previously for the Village Voice, New York Resident, and Boulder Weekly. On a Friday morning, Lt. Col. Robert Alessi sits in his office in the basement of Theodore...
The Elizabethan Achievement : Honoring Britain's Golden Age
This year marks the four hundredth anniversary of the close of Elizabeth's reign, and Britain is honoring the extraordinary artistic legacy of the age that bears her name. The reign of Elizabeth was one long, infinitely postponed wedding celebration,...
The Four Corners of Kvarner : For a Glimpse of the Mediterranean "As It Was," the Northern Adriatic Islands of Cres, Krk, Rab, and Pag Are a Good Place to Start
The Croatian islands that lie at the top of the Adriatic are popular vacation spots for natives, but they are yet to be discovered by the world. Their unfamiliarity is probably due to many factors, not the least being their relative inaccessibility....
The Jayson Blair Credibility Crisis
The New York Times' reputation as the premier newspaper in America took over 150 years to build, but it only took one reporter's horrific misdeeds to bring that reputation and the whole credibility of the American media, into dispute. The reporter...
The Jayson Blair Credibility Crisis : The Race Issue
One of the most highly contested issues in the Jayson Blair fiasco has been whether Blair, who is black, was given special treatment because of his race--a consideration that kept him on staff long after he proved untrustworthy. Like most newspapers...
The Letter Box Village : The Folk Art of St.-Martin-d'Abbat
The mailboxes of St.-Martin-d'Abbat, a village beside the Loire about a hundred miles south of Paris, are no longer the mundane tools of everyday life but have become pieces of folk art. Dubbed the "Letter Box Village," St.-Martin boasts in its shops...
The Results of American Incarceration
Any answer to the question "What do we get from imprisonment?" has to recognize that imprisonment in the United States today operates differently than it does in any other modernized or democratic state in the world. Let's begin with a little thought...
Who Was JFK?
Alan Levine's article in Modern Thought, "John F. Kennedy Without Tears," calls to mind how radically my evaluation of John F. Kennedy transformed in the short three years of his presidency. I became a Democrat in 1928, although my father was a Republican....
Why the U.S. Needs an Official Language
In June, the Pew Research Center announced the results of an extensive survey on global trends such as the spread of democracy, globalization, and technology. Titled "Views of a Changing World," it was conducted from 2001 to 2003 and polled 66,000...