The World and I

World and I is an encyclopedic journal that includes world news; developments in science, the arts and philosophy; book reviews; and photo essays. Since it was founded in 1986, it is printed monthly. The journal is published by Washington Times Corp.Subjects for World and I include science; literature and literary reviews; food and cooking; art; travel and tourism; politics; philosophy; music and musical instruments; drama and theatre. The editor is Steve Osmond.

Articles from Vol. 19, No. 5, May

Analyzing Al Qaeda and Protecting America
A former correspondent in South America for Knight-Ridder newspapers specializing in guerrilla movements, Jon Basil Utley recently has written for the Harvard Business Review and Insight magazine. For 17 years he was a commentator on the Voice of America....
A Once Hidden People: The Yanomami of Brazil's Amazon
Victor Englebert is a freelance photojournalist. Photography for this essay was gathered from the mid-1980s to 2000. No navigable rivers cross the mountainous rain-forest region of Brazil and Venezuela that the Yanomami call home. They lived in...
Berlinale Bust
Scarlet Cheng is a contributing editor to The World & I and is based in Los Angeles. Berlin's renowed film festival shows cinema in the doldrums, with listless dialogue, cardboard characters, gore, and special effects trumping solid storytelling....
Building Civic Participation: Regaining a Social Voice
Allan Luks is executive director of Big Brothers Big Sisters of New York City. He is the author of four books, including The Healing Power of Doing Good. A family court clerk suggested a new idea to forty members of a civic group. For at least a...
Charle Ives, America's Musical Visionary
Susan Osmond is an editor for the Arts section of The World & I. Composer Charles Ives was a constant innovator, pioneering daring techniques and utilizing hymns and popular tunes to make music that vividly evokes a primal human community and...
Designing Foods to Prevent Diseases
Jessica Hankinson is a freelance science writer based in Pendleton, South Carolina. She has a graduate degree in botany and teaches English at Clemson University. By careful genetic engineering of certain fruits and vegetables, scientists hope to...
Equal Prospect and Parental Choice
Jennifer Marshall is director of domestic policy studies at the Heritage Foundation in Washington, D.C. Conservatives constitute a large contingent among proponents of parental choice in education, but its advocates also include Democratic and liberal...
Finding Faith in War and Peace
Randy Boyagoda's writings on literature, culture, and religion have appeared in First Things, the Human Life Review, American Enterprise Magazine, and other scholarly and literary publications. Some of the most powerfully rendered moments of personal...
Haitham Bundakji: Healer of Religious Hatred
Larry Moffitt is vice president of United Press International. Robert R. Selle is an editor in the Current Issues section of The World & I. Twenty years ago, if you were Jewish and lived next door to Haitham Bundakji, your life would not have...
Haiti's Governmental Crisis
Aristide's finest hour UNITED STATES--About the best that can be said about Jean-Bertrand Aristide's misrule in Haiti is that he finally abandoned it to save himself, thus sparing his country further bloodshed. Clearly no end to the Haitian crisis...
Hoops for Hope: American Basketball Is Ambassador in Africa
Lisa Selin Davis is a freelance writer based in Brooklyn, New York. Her first novel, Belly, will be published by Little, Brown in spring 2005. When thirteen-year-old Sam Walker sent out invitations to his bar mitzvah last year, he wasn't dreaming...
How Rich Consumers Are Aiding Poor Nations
Rory Van Loo is a freelance writer who has worked on economic development projects in Argentina, Brazil, Costa Rica, Ivory Coast, India, Peru, Senegal, and Vietnam. A new "people to people" form of international aid, which encourages grassroots...
Introduction: Brown V. Board at 50
On May 17, 1954, the U.S. Supreme Court announced its decision in Brown v. Topeka Board of Education that "separate educational facilities are inherently unequal." The decision effectively denied the legal basis for segregation in Kansas and 20 other...
King of the Night Skies
Dwight G. Smith is professor and chairman of the biology department at Southern Connecticut State University in New Haven. His book Great Horned Owl was published in 2002 by Stackpole Books. Long a symbol of the North American wilderness, the great...
Liberal Activist, Conservative Hero
He's featured on more than one U.S. postage stamp. A breakaway Catholic congregation considers him a saint. Countless streets and boulevards across America are named after him, and he's the only citizen honored by a federal holiday. He's Dr. Martin...
Marble Is Life: The Quarries of Carrara, Tuscany
Martin Gani is a freelance writer based in Como, Italy. From a distance, it seems as if avalanches of snow have slipped down the hillsides of Tuscany's Apuan Alps. Seen at closer range, the image solidifies into marble quarries that surround the...
Mercury in the Body
Mercury is a slow, subtle poison. Through long-term exposure, it accumulates in the body, gradually causing such symptoms as impaired peripheral vision, hearing, and speech; numbness and loss of coordination in the extremities; muscle weakness; memory...
Mercury: The Two-Faced Element
Steve Voynick is a freelance writer residing in Twin Lakes, Colorado. William E. Brooks, mercury specialist with the United States Geological Survey, reviewed this article for accuracy. A valued but toxic agent for mining gold, fighting disease,...
No Child Left Behind-A Parable
John S. Taylor is former superintendent of schools, Lancaster County School District, South Carolina. My dentist is great! He sends me reminders so I don't forget checkups. He uses the latest techniques based on research. He never hurts me, and...
One Type of Immune Response
To determine the strength of your immune system, doctors often count the number of white blood cells in your blood. White blood cells are essential components of the immune system. They defend your body against invading pathogens and also help it reap...
Passing Students but Failing Schools?
There is evidence that highly successful schools are sometimes being judged as failures because, as one writer put it, "the federal and state testing accountability systems under No Child Left Behind are mathematical hocus-pocus unrelated to real-life...
Providing Opportunity
David W. Almasi is executive director of the National Center for Public Policy Research and director of the African-American leadership network Project 21. In 1951 Oliver Brown sought a better education for his daughters. His case resulted in the...
Ray Martin Abeyta: When Worlds Collide
Born and raised in the Espa-ola Valley of northern New Mexico, Ray Abeyta now lives in New York, where he creates elaborate paintings in a Baroque, Latin American style infused with contemporary content. Despite the relocation, the talented artist...
Relentless Intellect: A Profile of Rebecca West
Herb Greer is contributing editor to the Arts section of The World & I. Most writers today, even very good ones, are comfortable to approach, because they are relatively predictable. With Saul Bellow, for instance, one knows pretty much what...
Renaissance in the North: New Life in England's Industrial North
Sharon Hudgins is a food and travel writer who has lived in and traveled extensively throughout Great Britain. She has a particular interest in British museums specializing in arts and crafts and the Industrial Revolution. Once industrial revolution...
Squandering Brown's Benefit
On a segment of the ABC News program This Week that aired in 2000, the Reverend Jesse Jackson compared the quality of government-run schools to the quality of tap water. Taking Washington, D.C., as the example, he postulated that if the water was good...
The BBC Meets Its Waterloo
Trevor Butterworth is a senior fellow at the Center for Media and Public Affairs and a former commentator for the BBC/WGBH show The World. War has never been an easy subject for the British Broadcasting Corporation to cover, especially when British...
The Bible Is Their Battlefield: Archaeology and Israel's Right to Be
Nechemia Meyers is a freelance writer based in Rehovot, Israel. The battle for the legitimacy of Israel, even perhaps for its survival, is being fought by archaeologists in Jerusalem. And the Bible is their battlefield. Can the Jewish presence...
The End of the Oregon Trail: Oregon's Willamette Valley and Coast
Timothy Rake is a freelance writer, photographer, and educator based in Eugene, Oregon, where he teaches French language and literature. He has previously written about the Pacific Northwest for The World & I. No longer the last American frontier...
The Jacobean Syndrome
Herb Greer is a contributing editor to the Arts section of The World & I. The glories of Elizabethan age theater succumbed to Jacobean works ripe with torture, hatred, and revenge. Such human flaws are not lost on a new generation of playwrights....
The Padstow Obby Oss: Cornwall's Dancing Hobbyhorse
Paul Glendell is a freelance photojournalist based in Great Britain. He wishes to thank John Buckingham and the Padstow Museum for their assistance in his research for this article. Twisting and weaving to the rhythm of dozens of beating drums and...
They Also Served: Women in World War II
James Roberts is director of Radio America. As the nation prepares to dedicate the National World War II Memorial on the Mall on May 29, the crucial role that women played in winning the war has received little attention. While it is true that the...
The Zelman Decision
When the Supreme Court ruled on June 27, 2002, that the Cleveland Scholarship Program was constitutional, some observers hailed the decision as the most important ruling for educational opportunity since Brown v. Board of Education. The Court's decision...
Through the Looking Glass: How Japanese Photography Came of Age
Darwin Marable is a photo historian, writer, lecturer, and independent curator based in the San Francisco Bay area. From the first photos taken of Commodore Perry's arrival to today's surreal images, the Japanese have had a love affair with the...
Thurgood Marshall: The Force Pushing Brown
Born in Baltimore, Maryland, on July 2, 1908, Thurgood Marshall was the grandson of a slave. His father, William Marshall, embedded in him an appreciation for the U.S. Constitution and the rule of law. He attended Lincoln University, a black institution...
What Did They Mean by That?
Leslie Rayburn is a freelance writer and public school teacher in Watsonville, California. She has been writing on education issues for many years. There is a sense of unease, anger, and confusion in the air at Freedom School. Teachers are under...
Where Do We Go from Here?
Krista Kafer is a senior policy analyst for education at the Heritage Foundation, a Washington-based think tank. Will Rogers once said, "If you ever injected truth into politics, you would have no politics." This is especially true when it comes...
Why the Critics of Iraq Make Even Less Sense Than Its Defenders
On several occasions before the Iraq invasion, I warned against it as a high-variance gamble. If the gamble is lost, as it may be, the costs will have been too high. If it is won--and it certainly serves the interests of this country to win it--the...