The World and I

World and I is an encyclopedic journal that includes world news; developments in science, the arts and philosophy; book reviews; and photo essays. Since it was founded in 1986, it is printed monthly. The journal is published by Washington Times Corp.Subjects for World and I include science; literature and literary reviews; food and cooking; art; travel and tourism; politics; philosophy; music and musical instruments; drama and theatre. The editor is Steve Osmond.

Articles from Vol. 14, No. 1, January

A Diminished Presidency
Clinton's character flaws have undercut his capacity to lead. Iwill start with a disclaimer. It is my view that President Clinton should have resigned months ago. Clinton's transgression may not be an impeachable offense; his behavior is unacceptably...
America Needs Missile Defense
The most dangerous security threat facing the United States today comes from missiles armed with nuclear, biological, or chemical warheads capable of reaching U.S. soil from locations around the world. The danger stems not only from the fact that these...
Andrew Manze: Crazy for Baroque
Violinist-conductor Manze knows that Baroque music was made to be passionate, fun, and improvised, and his acclaimed yet controversial performances are breaking new ground. On the face of it, chamber and orchestral music of the seventeenth and eighteenth...
Arctic Hunters: Life in Savissivik, Greenland's Remote Inuit Community
Qaerngak stooped motionless on the ice beside a seal's breathing hole, as his ancestors have for thousands of years. I waited by the sled two hundred yards away, where his team of huskies gazed intently at their master. Ten minutes passed. Then suddenly,...
Behind the Mask: Bulgaria's Koukeri Ritual
The child quietly walked up behind the man in the fur-covered mask. Casting a furtive glance back at her smiling parents, she reached out to touch the bells dangling from his waist. He spun to face her, brandishing his sword. "Grrrrrr!" roared the...
Canine in the Wild
Vigorous as a predator, affectionate toward its pack, the gray wolf elicits both fear and admiration among humans. "Long ago when the earth was new, and Anishinable (the first man of the Chippewa) was walking the earth naming all of creation, lands...
Chronicler of Barsetshire: A Profile of Anthony Trollope
Judging by his childhood and youth, the great Victorian novelist Anthony Trollope should have been one of life's victims, destined to drag out his days in abject misery. Instead, after something of a slow start, Trollope saw his first novel published...
Handling Hydrogen Safely
The tragic accident in which the Hindenburg was consumed in a fire in 1937 still haunts the public memory. It conveys the impression that hydrogen, the gas that filled the blimp, is too dangerous to handle. On the other hand, NASA investigators have...
How Not to Control Crimes against Humanity
Legalists love to pass laws and solve problems juridically, often in disregard of the conditions of society and the circumstances that make the effort useful. As a consequence, they often make things worse than if the effort had never been made. Yet...
Kathleen Eaton: Urban Isolation
My work," says artist Kathleen Eaton, "focuses on city and suburban life and reflects a fascination with architectural spaces and the unexpected solitude or human activities that occur in them." Born and brought up in Chicago, Eaton has observed...
Leashing the Dogs of War
The vast technological advances of the twentieth century have certainly aided and improved human life enormously, but they have also come with a terrible downside--war has become much more horrible and devastating. Whereas in previous centuries wars...
McLuhan All-at-Once
Though his slogan "the medium is the message" mystified some and infuriated many, McLuhan never said that the message (i.e., the content) of a particular TV show or book has no importance. He merely wanted to point us in another direction. Look at...
Moral Majoritarian
Not many men can say by the age of 65 that they've founded a university, a gargantuan metropolitan church, a nationwide radio and television ministry, and a political movement that elected a president. But although the Rev. Jerry Falwell can indeed...
Paleontology in the National Park Service
Every morning during the summer months, Herb Meyer begins his day by inspecting a small hillside excavation where college interns are busy recovering insect and leaf fossils. As park paleontologist at Colorado's Florissant Fossil Beds National Monument,...
Paleontology: The Profession
In just the last three years, paleontologists have made front-page news by recovering South American fossils of Gigantosaurus carolinii, an eight-ton predator even larger than the familiar Tyrannosaurus rex; extremely rare soft-tissue fossils of the...
Reinventing the Book World
After surviving and thriving more than 500 years, the printed book may finally be displaced by a better technology. In the two centuries before the fall of Rome, the book assumed the facing-page, bound-edge format that it still retains today. Subsequent,...
Should Clinton Be Impeached or Censured?
The Special Report in Current Issues this month centers on the impeachment hearings. Prior to the House vote authorizing an inquiry, I wrote to Henry Hyde, chairman of the House Judiciary Committee, suggesting that the committee ultimately recommend...
Solar Hydrogen: Powering the New Millennium
Our current economy, which drains natural resources and pollutes the environment, can be restructured to provide prosperity without pollution by replacing fossil fuels with hydrogen produced using renewable energy sources. Virtually everyone seeks...
Stand Up and Be Counted: The 2000 Census
The 1787 Constitutional Convention was in turmoil. The smaller states were threatening a walkout over the "Virginia Plan." Proposing a Congress that would create a House elected by popular vote and a Senate elected by the House, it would give the large...
The Arctic Light
Andrea Barrett reveals her untold quest connecting science, history, and art. For a moment, Captain Ahab's contemptuous eyes held my vision, but I retracted from his glare; Dr. Frankenstein's tortured whispers and diary ramblings echoed in my ears...
The Crisis of the Presidency
In the wake of the Starr report detailing the case for impeaching President Clinton, and in light of the November elections, which left Republicans in control of Congress, many Americans are asking: Will the House of Representatives proceed with...
The Dragon: Mythical Beasts of the Middle East, Part 2
Typically, the dragon is a tall, standing serpent with a scaly body, a crocodilian head, four feet, horns, wings, and a propensity to belch fire and smoke. For some, this image has embodied the idea of cosmic order and chaos. For others, it has posed...
The First Years of Printing
The rise of a merchant class in Europe during the twelfth and thirteenth centuries led to the creation of universities. By the end of the thirteenth century, universities had been established in Bologna, Padua, Siena, and Vicenza in Italy, as well...
The Greek Idea of Disease, Madness, and Art
Modern man has a primarily negative attitude toward disease and madness. Our ideal is normality and health, and we fear illness, pain, and loss of control; we prize physical perfection, athleticism, and beauty, and cherish our rationality. Our culture...
The Information Age Is Over
Marshall McLuhan--the pundit best known for his slogan "the medium is the message"--described the information age as an age of "all-at- onceness," in which space and time are overcome by television, jets, and computers. In such an all-at-once world,...
The Road Ahead: Life of the American Trucker
John Steinbeck was a student of truckers. One need only read the second chapter of The Grapes of Wrath, in which a trucker gives Tom Joad a lift. Steinbeck's economical, precisely drawn portrait of the man--a minor character, after all--betrays his...
The Russian Meltdown
"Even the Communist opposition do not speak of revolution. They speak of new elections." ----Andrei Kozyrev, former foreign minister "Liberal reforms in Russia are dead and will not spring back to life at least until the 2004 presidential elections."...
The Starr Report: Grounds for Impeachment?
Kenneth Starr offers "substantial and credible information" that the president committed perjury, concealed evidence, and tampered with witnesses in the Paula Jones case. House Document 105--310 may or may not lead to the impeachment of President...
Toward Middle East Peace? the Why Summit
UNITED STATES--Perhaps the most significant development at the Wye conference was the explicit acknowledgment of the de facto Americanization of the peace process. The CIA will now directly assist Mr. Arafat's forces in the fight against terrorism....
Unbalanced Budget Reporting
On September 30, President Clinton announced that the U.S. government would end fiscal year 1998 with a surplus of $70 billion. The last time Congress balanced the budget, Lyndon Johnson sat in the White House, the Vietnam War was at its height, the...
Waiting for 2000
The unexpected November election results gave boosts to Republican George W. Bush and Democrat Dick Gephardt. The unexpected November election results turned politics 2000 on its head, giving a big boost to one man on each side of the aisle: Republican...
You Can Go Home Again
Though his hometown of salinas, california, once rejected john steinbeck, it recently opened the national steinbeck center, financed mostly by the produce industry that had labeled him a left-wing troublemaker. ``The only good writer is a dead writer."...