The World and I

World and I is an encyclopedic journal that includes world news; developments in science, the arts and philosophy; book reviews; and photo essays. Since it was founded in 1986, it is printed monthly. The journal is published by Washington Times Corp.Subjects for World and I include science; literature and literary reviews; food and cooking; art; travel and tourism; politics; philosophy; music and musical instruments; drama and theatre. The editor is Steve Osmond.

Articles from Vol. 19, No. 6, June

Alison Wright: The Optimistic Eye
Children are often the most honest reflection of the society in which they live. Faces of Hope: Children of a Changing World (New World Library, 2003), from which these images were taken, offers a glimpse of the diverse environments in which our children...
A Rocky Mountain High: A Summer Visit to Butte, Colorado
Stephen Gorman is an award-winning writer and photographer based in Norwich, Vermont. Although better known for its winter sports offerings, crested Butte, Colorado, is an excellent destination for an action-packed, flower- filled summer vacation....
A Romanian Passion: Revising the Classics
John Elsom is a contributing editor to the Arts section of The World & I. From Titus Andronicus to Hamlet and Faust, inspired Romanian theatrical productions are imbuing the classics with morality and passion. A few plays connect the whole...
A Two-Way Diaspora
Pramit Pal Chaudhuri is foreign editor at the Hindustan Times. The brain drain has come full circle: many Indian Americans are returning to India seeking jobs. If the Brothers Grimm had come up with a fairy tale about the Indian immigrant, it...
Before You Begin
When you are ready to make jam, run the jars and rings through one dishwasher cycle to clean them thoroughly, or wash them in hot water and dishwashing liquid. Rinse lids in warm water and dishwashing liquid, taking care not to damage the colored gaskets,...
Breaking onto the World Scene
Uday Lal Pai is a freelance business journalist, market analyst, and technology writer based in Kochi, India. Those who ignore India's rise do so at their own peril. A new spirit of economic freedom is now stirring in India, bringing sweeping...
Does Abortion Access Protect Women's Health?
Jeanne E. Head, a retired labor and delivery nurse, is vice president for international affairs and UN representative for the National Right to Life Committee. Laura Hussey is a Ph.D. student and research assistant for the National Right to Life Committee....
Dollars in the Classroom
Jay P. Greene is a senior fellow and Greg Forster is a senior research associate at the Manhattan Institute's Education Research Office (www.miedresearchoffice.org). Politicians and the media have long had a misplaced obsession with levels of school...
Don't Call Me Comrade: A Czech People and Nation
Eric P. Olsen is associate executive editor at The World & I. The author would like to thank the Czech Tourist Authority (www.czechtourism.com) and Czech Airlines (www.csa.cz) for their generous assistance in the preparation of this article. ...
Error-Free TV?
Tim Graham is director of media analysis at the Media Research Center in Alexandria, Virginia, and the author of Pattern of Deception: The Media's Role in the Clinton Presidency. Many of America's most distinguished newspapers have a regular (even...
Fallujah Atrocities
The mailed fist UNITED STATES--The atrocities in Fallujah are raising a wide range of passions in the hearts of Americans--from the instinct to retreat, to the urge for us to apply crushing, military collective retribution against the locals. All...
From the Groundless to the Ridiculous
The following hypothetical example--which has many parallels in the real world--shows that abortion estimates can become grossly distorted if the World Health Organization's (WHO) methodology is used. Researchers would like to estimate the number...
Giants of the Deep
Alessandro De Maddalena is president of the Italian Ichthyological Society, curator of the Italian Great White Shark Data Bank, and a founding member of the Mediterranean Shark Research Group. Famous for their colossal size and power, whales are...
How I Lost My Faith in TV News Ethics
As a professor of political science at the University of Chicago, I had been done in by so many print and TV reporters who misrepresented what I told them during the fifties, sixties, and seventies that I was refusing to let them interview me anymore....
India's Hype, Hope, and Hazards
Mahmood H. Butt is chairman of the secondary education department at Eastern Illinois University in Charleston. Optimistic signs of economic development obscure the disparities of economic growth and opportunities in different regions, states, and...
Introduction: World Power India
One-third the size of the United States, yet containing over three times as many people, India is truly a subcontinent that contains a proud and diversified people. This month we examine India's continued progress as a growing economic and technological...
Iraq's Complicity in Terrorism
Laurie Mylroie was adviser on Iraq to the 1992 Clinton campaign and is author of Bush vs. the Beltway: How the CIA and the State Department Tried to Stop the War on Terror (HarperCollins). In 1992, when Richard Clarke assumed the counterterrorism...
Making a Capacitor Ultra
Ultracapacitors resemble batteries in having two electrodes immersed in an electrically responsive liquid, the electrolyte. Applying a potential (voltage) across the ultracapacitor's electrodes polarizes the electrolyte, with roughly half of the electrolyte...
Matthew Daniels: Undergirding Marriage
Robert R. Selle is an editor in the Current Issues section of The World & I. Marriage advocate Matthew Daniels defends a traditional social institution in untraditional ways. In fact, he seems to have been destined almost from birth to champion...
Michelle Holzapfel: Organic Meditations
"I have acquired a habit of thought that conceives of each form as having a biography," says wood turner and carver Michelle Holzapfel, "revealing stories that are as varied as each view She is one of the few women to have achieved renown in the...
Paint: Coloring Our World
Glenn Carroll Strait is an editor in the Natural Science section of The World & I. Tom Hansen is a freelance technical writer who has worked for Rohm and Hass company, a major supplier of products for the coating industry. Important throughout...
Peti's Malu: Traditions of Samoan Tattooing
Anders Ryman is a freelance photojournalist. The quick and rhythmic blows of the mallet are heard from the house where seventeen-year-old Peti lies stretched on the floor in front of the tattooist. Time after time the mallet lands on the tattooing...
Rafting the Snake: Finding God in Idaho's Hell's Canyon
Jonathan Grubbs is a writer who lives in California. He was tall--about 7'2", hence the name: Stretch. And when he grabbed those rocks, I should have known something was about to go down, literally. * * * For several years my two uncles, Rodney...
'ReImagine the World': The Photography of Andrea Baldeck
Stephen Henkin is an editor for the Arts section of The World & I. Drawing on her experience as a musician and a doctor, Andrea Baldeck has created black-and-white images that compel us to look for the meaning of things. When asked why she...
Saint Waudru
Ninth- and tenth-century texts, probably recopied by monks from earlier documents, make reference to Saint Waudru and four of her children. Born in the seventh century, she was of good family and was married. Once their children were of reasonable...
Sheldon Harvey: Walking in Beauty
Stephen Goode is a writer for Insight magazine, based in Washington, D.C. The elegantly restrained sculptures and paintings of young Navajo artist Sheldon Harvey bring new life to his people's spiritual traditions, yet speak powerfully to the uninitiated....
Sickness and the Miracle of Modern Medicine: A Personal Story
Ron Potts is a fiction writer from West Virginia whose stories occasionally appear in The World & I. Doctors and medical people are so far over my head that I have no choice but to hold them in mysterious awe. It's particularly exasperating...
Sidewalk Serendipity: Cultural Diversity in Sri Lanka's Old Colombo
Dave Bartruff is an award-winning photojournalist who has traveled to more than eighty countries. Based in California, he has been a contributor to The World & I since 1987. An exploration of old Colombo, Sri Lanka's capital and historic seaport,...
Suffering in Comfort
John Attarian, a freelance writer in Ann Arbor, Michigan, has contributed several economics articles and book reviews to The World & I. Examining the disconnection between material progress and happiness, this wide-ranging book combines wisdom...
The Bollywood Factor
India has the world's biggest movie industry in terms of the number of films produced (around 1,000 annually). It is a great sector for foreign investment by corporatized entertainment companies; however, the domestic filmmaking industry, despite its...
The Joy of Making Jam
Joanne Seiff lives in Kentucky with her husband and dog, both of whom enjoy homemade bread and jam. Her work has appeared on Salon.com, in Belle Armoire, and in Interweave Knits. A convert to canning overcomes the fear of making jam. Byline:Text...
The Kladruber Horse
No artifact or architectural work is more emblematic of the four- hundred-year Hapsburg reign and Czech imperial history than the Kladruber horse. Descended from Spanish and Italian stock, the horse was introduced to Bohemia during the reign of Emperor...
The Labyrinth Within: Franz Kafka and the Predicament of Modern Man
Eric Olsen is executive editor of The World & I. And yet Kafka was Prague and Prague was Kafka. Never had it been Prague so perfectly, so typically, as during Kafka's lifetime, and never would it be so again. And we, his friends, ... knew that...
The Marvelous Spectacles of Olympia and Marathon: The Roots of the Olympics and Marathon Racing
Claire Hopley writes about travel, food, and literature. She lives in western Massachusetts and spends several weeks each year in Greece and England. Two ancient spots in Greece hold the history of the Olympic Games marathon racing. When the...
Triumph of the Good: Mons, Belgium, Celebrates Its Patron Saints
Stephen Osmond is associate senior editor of the Culture section of The World & I. When the great dragon enters the town square, his tail twitches and lashes about. One wild swing breaks a string holding a vendor's cluster of balloons, sending...
Ultracapacitors Challenge the Battery
John M. Miller, owner of J-N-J Miller Design Services, in Cedar, Michigan, holds 44 patents on various aspects of automotive power and propulsion systems. He chairs the KiloFarad International Education and Outreach working group devoted to promoting...
Up Close and Personal: New York's Chamber Dance Project
Susan Tenaglia, currently based in Westport, Connecticut, is an arts writer, critic, and historian. An intimate, informal atmosphere, which brings the audience close enough to hear a dancer's breath, is the hallmark of the Chamber Dance Project....
Why Roosevelt Was a Great President
As I read the review of the book on Roosevelt [see "Democracy on the Edge," p. xxx], I thought it, and perhaps the book, did not adequately convey an understanding of what made Roosevelt a great president and that the concept of cause in historical...
Why the Law Should Discourage Some Sexual Practices
Camille Williams, a lawyer who lives in Utah, writes on law and public policy. In Lawrence v. Texas, the U.S. Supreme Court found unconstitutional a Texas law that criminalized private sexual activity between consenting adults of the same sex. Although...