The World and I

World and I is an encyclopedic journal that includes world news; developments in science, the arts and philosophy; book reviews; and photo essays. Since it was founded in 1986, it is printed monthly. The journal is published by Washington Times Corp.Subjects for World and I include science; literature and literary reviews; food and cooking; art; travel and tourism; politics; philosophy; music and musical instruments; drama and theatre. The editor is Steve Osmond.

Articles from Vol. 13, No. 12, December

A Croatian Christmas
WHETHER OBSERVED IN THE MOTHER COUNTRY, CANADA, OR THE UNITED STATES, THE HOLIDAY TRADITIONS OF THE RECENTLY INDEPENDENT NATION OF CROATIA DRAW FAMILY AND FRIENDS TOGETHER WITH DELICIOUS FOOD AND FESTIVITIES. When young, I was often embarrassed...
Act Your Age!
Medical and social change are remaking the last years of life; now older Americans can and should remake themselves, too. "Old age," the elderly grandmother of a friend of mine declared some decades ago, "is most unsatisfactory. It should be changed...
A Little World
France's Christmas Tradition of the Santon Christmas in France, and in culturally French parts of Europe, is marked by the appearance of santons. These are tiny models of people, usually arranged in townscapes or some storytelling dioramas. The...
All Men Are Created Equal
"We hold these truths to be self-evident; that all men are created equal." So wrote Thomas Jefferson in the Declaration of Independence. But does this self-evident truth mean that all people are born equal in all ways? Some individuals are born...
A Treasure in Green
The year is 1538. The Spanish conquistadors have been blazing a trail of domination and destruction all the way from northern Mexico to the doorstep of Bogota, Colombia. As Capt. Luis Lanchero prepares his troops to fight the seemingly indomitable...
A Worldwide Phenomenon
Today, religious persecution by communist regimes and militant Islamic societies poses the greatest threat to religious freedom. The twentieth century has seen the worst religious persecution in history. More Christians, Jews, and Buddhists have...
Big Bad Rigs
Trucking in American Popular Culture Few professions have been as iconically American as that of the trucker: an individualistic loner living on the open road, transporting the goods to power a nation, stopping only to reload, refuel, or help a...
Daniel Brush the Midas Touch
Until recently, Daniel Brush has been one of the art world's best-kept secrets. And not unlike the discovery of a gold nugget by an eager prospector, the public's encounter with this goldsmith's exquisite craft has been fortunate indeed. Seventy of...
Discovering a Hidden Industry
Advanced ceramics are the enabling materials of a silent revolution that's enhancing our quality of life in numerous ways. One of the oldest materials known to humankind is clay. People of ancient cultures discovered that this material, when soft,...
Full Disclosure
Somalia's rapid breakdown and descent into civil war is revealed through the saga of one family. Nuruddin Farah is one of Africa's greatest magicians, constantly reinventing himself as a writer and surprising his readers with each subsequent novel....
Jump and Go Fly
Combining the takeoff, and landing capabilities of a helicopter with the forward flight capabilities of a turboprop plane, the new and agile tiltrotor aircraft is finally ready for action. If all goes according to plan, two U.S. Marine Corps pilots...
Letters to the Editor
Patent Law and the Founding Fathers To the Editor: Mark Sagoff ["Patented Genes: An Ethical Appraisal," September 1998, p. 186] is mistaken in thinking that objections to gene patents are simply a matter of religious superstition. On the contrary,...
Luftlmalerei: Bavaria's `Paintings in the Air'
Celebrated outdoor frescoes and violin-making workshops in Mittenwald, Germany, recall the storied past of this medieval commercial crossroads. Tiny Mittenwald is sheltered picturesquely at the base of Germany's Karwendel Mountains, a range of the...
Making God Laugh
Howard Norman explores the estrangement and reclamation of the soul. What is sacrificed to maintain that coat of varnish called civilization? And what might that sublimation process tell us about the mystery of identity? Such questions haunt Howard...
More Than MAGIC
While the magic Johnson Theater in LA's Crenshaw district has brought state-of-the-art cinemas and visibility to the area, the real story lies outside the gated complex. As the hot sun beats down on the pavement of the abandoned parking lot across...
NICKELODEON: Not Just Kids' Play
With over 72 million households tuned in, Nickelodeon may seem like just Rugrats and kids getting slimed, but it's only the tip of a worldwide media empire poised to make some big moves. The Nickelodeon network may be the current TV fun spot for...
`Plucky Heroes' OF THE NEW REVOLUTION
While touring in China, one cannot avoid the growing presence of a new generation of entrepreneurs determined to make a better life for themselves. On the Great Wall, a message from Mao reads: "Not a plucky hero until one reaches the Great Wall."...
Presidential Character, Presidential Actions
When "anything goes," it's much easier to accept that President Clinton was sexually involved with a 21-year-old White House intern and used his vast influence to cover it up. Arguably, we've grown too empty -- with the breakdown of family, community,...
Renewing the Renaissance and Its Literature
The Renaissance began as a cultural movement in fifteenth-century Italy. It was instigated by educational reformers called humanists, whose influence spread northward during the next two centuries. Their new curriculum stressed rhetoric and the study...
Reynolds Price's Roxanna Slade
Editor's Introduction A great deal is revealed by how people face adversity. Some become demoralized and eventually succumb to a tragedy. Others grit their teeth, tuck their chins, and meet it head on, thus revealing the hidden saint or soldier....
Roxanna Slade
From my bad night on, I'd scarcely eaten a morsel, though nobody seemed to have noticed the fact. So now I had to reveal my slackness. I begged Palmer's pardon--there'd been so little I could offer him lately--and I said "In that case we'll have to...
Sex and the President
The media in today's America seem to be sexually schizophrenic--agonizingly torn between aggressive, voyeuristic coverage of politicians' sex lives and cold, studied aloofness to them. The first approach can be seen in coverage of such figures as...
The Global Reality of Religious Persecution
The end of the Cold War has brought serious religious tensions to the surface in dozens of countries around the world. The answer of many governments has been the systematic persecution of millions of people for their beliefs. One expert has described...
The Griffin
Mythical Beasts of the Middle East: Part I Four thousand years ago, Gudea, the ruler of Lagash, had a dream. "There was a man, who was a huge as heaven, as huge as earth. Underneath his feet was a very large bird--part eagle and part lion. He commanded...
The Moral Collapse of a Troubled Presidency
He is many a mother's dream and most fathers' nightmare: a smart, educated, disarmingly sincere, and decidedly charming suitor--but with a moral compass frozen at self-interest. He is the most skillful politician to occupy the White House since Lyndon...
The Most Consequential Actions of Our Presidents
In Joseph Ellis' fine book American Sphinx: The Character of Thomas Jefferson (1997), he states, "It [the Louisiana Purchase] was unquestionably the greatest achievement of the Jefferson presidency and, with room left for scholarly quibbling about...
The Mystery Beneath
Reynolds Price achieves a new balance between the visionary and the ordinary in Roxanna Slade. "Every time somebody calls me a saint, I repeat my name and tell them no saint was ever named Roxy." So begins Reynolds Price's new novel, Roxanna Slade,...
The Promise of Globalization or the Clash of Civilizations
If I were asked to give a name to our century, I would not hesitate for a single moment. I would call it the "Century of Globalization," because this will be its lasting legacy. The two dominant ideologies, communism and liberalism (liberalism meaning...
The Real West
Historian David Gress examines the origins and meaning of Western ideals, defending their importance to America's future. From Plato to NATO: The Idea of the West and Its Opponents is a multi-faceted book. In part it is a learned and critical study...
The Renaissance Mind Mirrored in Art
This article aims to outline some basic changes in worldview that took place during the Renaissance--a movement and an era of awakening that turned from the medieval order and laid the basis for Western civilization up to the present. Today, when the...
The Year Turns
Christmas Eve Illuminates Finland's Darkest Days Christmas Eve symbolizes the turning point of the year in Finland. When winter days can grow no shorter, weeks of activity and planning come to fruition. Indeed, no sooner do the long, endlessly light...
To Look the Other Way
The transition from living at home to life in college is a dramatic yet exciting experience. For Pam and Patty, roommates in a freshman coed dormitory just a few years ago, the experience provided special challenges. The young women are both Chinese...
Triste Navidad
Symbolism and Sad Christmas in Chiapas During Advent, the four weeks prior to Christmas, the colonial city of San Cristobal de Las Casas in Chiapas, Mexico, brims with religious activity. Christmas preparations take place inside homes and churches,...
Turn, Turn, Turn
Ubiquitous in natural and man-made environments, vortices are circular motions of gases and liquids that affect our everyday life in a variety of constructive and destructive ways. Even those of us who have no firsthand experience with the awesome...
Unilateral Sanctions Undermine U.S. Interests
[MISSING PAGES] mine the gravity of the alleged infraction of international law and the nature, duration, and effectiveness of potential responses. A number of suggestions for regaining control of the policy process with regard to imposing economic...
Where Folly Held a Fair
A profile of Edna St. Vincent Millay Nineteen hundred twelve was a critical year in the history of American poetry. Harriet Monroe's bold little magazines, Poetry, had just appeared, featuring such writers as Hilda Doolittle, Ezra Pound, and Amy...
Youth Gone Wild
William Finnegan's incisive reporting explores a dysfunctional generation and country. Since the founding of the republic, gentlemen and scholars, tramps and hoboes, have been lighting out for the territory in search of America. It's a strange phrase--Who...