The World and I

World and I is an encyclopedic journal that includes world news; developments in science, the arts and philosophy; book reviews; and photo essays. Since it was founded in 1986, it is printed monthly. The journal is published by Washington Times Corp.Subjects for World and I include science; literature and literary reviews; food and cooking; art; travel and tourism; politics; philosophy; music and musical instruments; drama and theatre. The editor is Steve Osmond.

Articles from Vol. 19, No. 10, October

Addressing Corporate Scandals through Business Education
Kenneth R. Gray is an associate professor of international management at the School of Business and Industry at Florida A&M University in Tallahassee, Florida. George W. Clark Jr. is associate professor of organizational behavior and ethics, also...
Agnes Martin: An Awareness of Perfection
The rarely exhibited early paintings of Agnes Martin executed before she was recognized as a stellar American minimalist artist are being shown by the Dia:Beacon museum to mark its first anniversary in the Hudson River town of Beacon, New York. ...
A Likely New Supersolid Phase of Matter
In a recent issue of Science Express, two physicists from Penn State University announced new experimental evidence for the existence of a new phase of matter, a "supersolid" form of helium-4 with the extraordinary frictionless-flow properties of a...
Allergy Shots: Liberation from Suffering
Jen Waters is a writer for The Washington Times. Paul Schneider sneezes and wheezes and itches on a regular basis. He has a hypersensitive immune system, leaving him with multiple allergies. To control his allergic reactions, Schneider, 43, of Falls...
Art from the Punjab: Eclectic Sikh Collection Surveys 500 Years of Faith
Joanna Shaw-Eagle is a writer for The Washington Times. Viewers who visit the National Museum of Natural History's intriguing "Sikhs: Legacy of the Punjab" will first notice an impressive, spotlighted Sikh nishan. The handsome, geometrically...
Attaining Peace in Divided Societies: 5 Principles of Emerging Doctrine
Ted Robert Gurr is Distinguished University Professor at the University of Maryland, where he directs the Minorities at Risk project, which tracks the political status and activities of more than 300 communal groups world-wide. An extraordinary...
Blogging Hits the Mainstream
Chris Baker is a writer for The Washington Times. You know blogging has gone mainstream when air-conditioning contractors are doing it. Blogs--short for Web logs--are online journals that, until recently, have been the domain primarily of amateur...
Como, Milano, Roma: Brilliant Sky over Lake, Treasures of Art, History
Corinna Lothar is a writer for The Washington Times. The first time I saw Lake Como in the Italian Lake District I was 20. My Swiss uncle drove from Basel over the Alps to the elegant old hotel Villa d'Este, originally a sixteenth-century private...
Defeating Terrorism through Engagement
Alon Ben-Meir is the Middle East project director at the World Policy Institute, New York, and a professor of international relations at New York University. Is it good for America to pursue a policy of behaving like a "crazed state"? Whereas...
Dinosaurs in the Dirt: Amateurs Dig with Pros to Uncover the Joys of Paleontology
Dina Mishev is a writer for The Washington Times. It's 103 degrees in the vegetation-starved badlands outside Great Falls, but no one is even eyeing the shade of a tarp strung up 20 feet away. How could we when a 150-million-year-old stegosaurus...
Dissecting a Hurricane with an Environmental Satellite
Hurricanes are one of those forces of nature that can only fully be captured by satellite imagery. For Hurricane Frances, which recently thundered toward the United States coast, the European Space Agency's (ESA) Envisat is going one better, peering...
EU Expansion Sows Doubts about the Future: Rift between Rich and Poor Nations Widens
Andrew Borowiec is a writer for The Washington Times. The European Union, 25 disparate nations spread from the North Sea to the eastern Mediterranean, has entered a period of discontent and doubt about its future objectives and cohesion. The chasm...
Forging a Path to Peace at a Time of Global Crisis
Bill Cook is national bureau manager of Tiempos del Mundo newspaper in Costa Rica. The following is an address that was presented at the twenty-first World Media Conference on April 25, 2004. I hope to make my remarks brief because you all know...
In Orbit: XM and Sirius Take Satellite Radio to a Higher Level
Christian Toto is a writer for The Washington Times. Once upon a time, disc jockey Vin Scelsa believed radio's accessibility served as the industry's bedrock--a transistor radio and fistful of batteries is all one needs. Now, the veteran gabber...
Introduction: Fine-Tuning the UN
In the warm glow of the peace following World War II, the nations of the world yearned mightily for a global organization that would be a forum for brotherhood, debate, and resolution of all of the problems that plagued the family of man. With the...
Kurds Build Their Own Identity: U.S. Provides a Long-Awaited Taste of Peace and Freedom
Julia Duin is a writer for The Washington Times. Americans may be vilified in much of Iraq, but in the 15,000 square miles encompassing Iraqi Kurdistan, wedding parties pose with U.S. soldiers, American flags are posted proudly on dashboards, and...
Leos Janacek: A Master Czech Composer
Thomas J. Pniewski is director of cutural affairs at the Kosciuszko Foundation in New York City. One of the most surprising figures of twentieth-century music is the Czech composer Leos Janacek. At the 1916 premiere of his opera Jenufa in Prague,...
Masterpieces of American Jewelry
American jewelry spanning 200 years of fashion is on display at the American Folk Art Museum in the new National Jewelry Institute's inaugural exhibition designed as a tribute to the creators and innovators of fine jewelry design. The elegant show,...
New Energy for Reintegration: Oil Exports Are Fueling Russia's Ties to East Asia
I-wei J. Chang is a writer for The Washington Times. Russia's energy exports to East Asia may drive the Eurasian country's reintegration with the region and enhance the security and stability of an area marked by long-standing rivalries and growing...
Numbers of Uninsured Grow Ominously
It's the economy--because the latest numbers on the uninsured in America, released recently by the U.S. Census Bureau, were not as high as some analysts had feared and they can be tied to a weak 2003 economy. Republicans will spin that 1 million...
Peering into the High Court's Future
Whoever wins the November presidential election will have an excellent chance at reshaping the Supreme Court of the United States and the direction it takes on a broad array of social and political issues. Or not, depending on whom you talk to. ...
Prosperity at an Acceptable Price: Yap and Palau Try to Protect Culture in the Age of Tourism
Louisa Kasdon Sidell is a freelance writer based in Massachusetts. The tribal chiefs, the villagers, and the elected officials on the tiny island State of Yap in Micronesia, look across at their neighbors on the islands of Palau, and they are afraid....
Rebuilding Iraq: Despite Disarray, Immense U.S. Effort Picks Up Speed
Betsy Pisik and Sharon Behn are writers for TheWashington Times. Normally, the sounds of hammering would be an annoyance in this health clinic, but young Iraqi mothers with small children pay little heed to the construction din overhead. The Baghdad...
Reform of the UN Security Council: A Comment on the South African Position
Albert J. Venter is professor in the Department of Political Studies at the Rand Afrikaans University, Johannesburg, South Africa. He is guest professor at the South African Defence College, the Naval Staff College, and the Foreign Service Institute,...
Rethinking the UN System: Prospects for a World Federation of Nations
Tim Murithi is a program officer for the Program on Peacemaking and Preventive Diplomacy at the United Nations Institute for Training and Research (UNITAR) in Geneva, Switzerland. On Tuesday, September 23, 2003, the secretary-general of the United...
Russian Social Fragmentation and Its Geopolitical Consequences
Dmitry Shlapentokh is a professor at Indiana University at South Bend. Those observing the tranquility in present-day Russia explain it in different ways. For some, this tranquility indicates that Russian society has finally reached equilibrium...
Seven Samurai Still Gritty and Great at 50
Gary Arnold is a writer for The Washington Times. The most persuasive argument for film preservation in my lifetime has been the continuing enhancement of Akira Kurosawa's Seven Samurai, which has returned to some theaters across the country for...
Solar Storms
Craig DeForest is a solar physicist at the Southwest Research Institute. Zap! Pow! Giant storms sweep through outer space! On October 28, 2003, part of the Sun exploded, giving rise to the third largest solar flare ever recorded. The explosion...
Students at Work: Opportunities Expand for Learning on the Job While in School
Shelley Widhalm is a writer for The Washington Times. Seventeen-year-old Kyle Vandell switches between wrenches and computers, depending on where he is fixing cars. Kyle, an intern at American Service Center-Mercedes-Benz in Arlington, Virginia,...
The Possibility of Life on Mars
Was Mars once a living world? Does life continue, even today, in a holding pattern, waiting until the next global warming event comes along? Many people would like to believe so. Scientists are no exception. But so far, no evidence has been found that...
Town Full of Charms in Ontario
Mary Margaret Green is a freelance writer. Eliza Doolittle and Henry Higgins are spending their summer on the shores of Lake Ontario, in the pretty Canadian town of Niagara-on-the- Lake. The first time Eliza saw it, she must have gasped, "Owww,...
UN Development Goals Fall Short: Poor Nations Need More Aid
Stephanie Dornschneider is a writer for The Washington Times. The world's poorest countries are in severe danger of failing to meet ambitious economic and development goals set for the next decade, according to a new report from the World Bank and...