The World and I

World and I is an encyclopedic journal that includes world news; developments in science, the arts and philosophy; book reviews; and photo essays. Since it was founded in 1986, it is printed monthly. The journal is published by Washington Times Corp.Subjects for World and I include science; literature and literary reviews; food and cooking; art; travel and tourism; politics; philosophy; music and musical instruments; drama and theatre. The editor is Steve Osmond.

Articles from Vol. 19, No. 12, December

Africa Struggles to Break Barriers to Internet
Marion Baillot is a writer with The Washington Times. Although Internet access took off quickly in the developed world, the story has been different in Africa, where it remains at an early stage of development. Internet users in Africa--the second...
Art as an Aid for Human Species Survival
Brett Cooke is associate professor of Russian at Texas A&M University at College Station, Texas. The World & I Online's two "Thinking About Art" articles for this month focus on the thought of biologist Edward O. Wilson. A Harvard professor...
Brittany's Broad Canvas
Corrinna Lothar is a writer with The Washington Times. PONT AVEN, Brittany From the fairy forest of Broceliande, where King Arthur, Guinevere, and Lancelot made their home when they were not across the Channel in Britain, to the mysterious megaliths...
Can We Reduce Chemistry to Physics?
Hans Primas is professor emeritus in theoretical chemistry at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zurich, Switzerland. Reductionism, if accepted, is usually accepted on faith and without logical evidence or sound reasons. Overblown claims...
Coastal Town Nurtures Art amid Chaos in Haiti
Larry Luxner is a writer with The Washington Times. In early March, a few days after armed rebels forced Haitian President Jean-Bertrand Aristide from office, vandals ransacked a Port-au-Prince art museum and burned dozens of paintings--as well...
Down Island or Up Island, the World Moves Slower on Martha's Vineyard
Brien Hefler is a writer with The Washington Times. Martha's Vineyard rises from the blue-green water of the Atlantic Ocean seven miles off the elbow of Cape Cod's curled bicep. Sculpted by a transient glacier, the landmass is easy enough to find...
EU Falls Short of Its Economic Goals: Major Reforms Weighed to Stay Competitive
Marion Baillot is a writer with The Washington Times. The economy of the world's richest bloc is in trouble. Authors of a comprehensive new study say the European Union has fallen far short of the goals announced at a March 2000 summit of EU leaders...
France Softens Its Stance against the U.S
Andrew Borowiec is a writer with The Washington Times. A more pragmatic and realistic French foreign policy is gradually replacing the defiant period of confrontation with the United States, especially after the latter's invasion of Iraq. The still-imprecise...
Introduction
Being human, we all too often become consumed with our own troubles. There are, of course, our personal troubles, which for most of us are nigh endless. Then, as Americans, we are afflicted by a host of troubles. There's too much crime. There's too...
Lapland's Mystic Land of Frost and Reindeer
Ben Barber is a senior writer at the U.S. Agency for International Development. Traveling to Helsinki in midwinter, we found the streets embossed with slippery blisters of ice. Gray skies poured snow constantly while creative little sidewalk ploughs...
Life's Precursors May Have Come from Space
Astronomers using the National Science Foundation's giant Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT) have discovered a frigid reservoir of simple sugar molecules in a cloud of gas and dust some 26,000 light-years away, near the center of our Milky Way...
Microcredit and the Empowerment of Jordan's Poor
Sana Abdallah is a writer withUnited Press International. In the center of the busy Wehdat Palestinian refugee camp in the Jordanian capital, Amman, Samira al-Ghaleeth stands between a wooden cart filled with plastic slippers and clothes lying on...
Nepal's Poor Suffer Most in Civil War: Maoist Rebels Seen Making Gains
Chitra Tiwari, formerly a lecturer of political science at Nepal's Tribhuvan University, is a Washington-based freelance analyst of international affairs specializing in South Asia. Three months after King Gyanendra's reinstatement of Prime Minister...
New Earth-Like Planet Is about the Size of Uranus
A European team of astronomers has discovered the lightest known planet orbiting a star other than the sun (an exoplanet). The new exoplanet orbits the bright star mu Arae located in the southern constellation of the Altar. It is the second planet...
Oceans: The Secret Factor in Climate Control
Scientists have long recognized the importance of oceans in our climate. In fact, the unique physical characteristics of our oceans are largely responsible for making the Earth a livable environment. Oceans are major "climate-controllers" because...
Our Presidents' Pets
Linda Owen is a freelance writer based in San Antonio, Texas. When U.S. presidents move their families to the White House, they always bring their pets with them--after all, pets are part of the family. Since the Presidential Mansion was first occupied...
Panama Leaders Considering Canal Upgrade: Waterway May Gain Third "Lane"
Heather J. Carlson is a writer with The Washington Times. Panama's government is considering an $8 billion expansion of the 90- year-old Panama Canal to allow bigger ships to cross to and from the Atlantic and Pacific oceans. Possible upgrades include...
Passing of 3 Great Composers Ends an Era in Film
T.L. Ponick is a writer with The Washington Times. Music fans of all ages noted with sadness the passing this summer in quick succession of three Hollywood giants: film composers Jerry Goldsmith, David Raksin, and Elmer Bernstein. All three scored...
Root Causes of Chechen Terror
Alon Ben-Meir is the Middle East project director at the World Policy Institute and a professor of international relations at the Center for Global Studies at New York University. Although terrorism is without exception reprehensible, as long as...
The Democracy/Media Link in Latin America
Ann Marie Look is a consultant on education and communication policy- making. Communication, information, and opinion have been historically recognized as one of the stronger forces of power--political or economic. This force requires and demands...
The Fundamentals That Unite Science and Art
Edward O. Wilson is a professor at Harvard University. The World & I Online's two "Thinking About Art" articles for this month focus on the thought of biologist Edward O. Wilson. A Harvard professor for four decades, Wilson has written 20 books,...
The Himalayas in New York: A New Museum to Expand Your World View
Fred Stern, currently based in Leonia, New Jersey, is a writer on art and architectural subjects for Artnet and other publications. Himalaya. The word means house of ice and snow in Sanskrit, the language of this mountainous region. But the word...
The MSG Debate: Illness Cases Taken with a Grain of Salt
Shelley Widhalm is a writer with The Washington Times. Restaurant owner Louis Cheng prefers using chicken broth instead of monosodium glutamate (MSG) to flavor the Asian cuisine he serves at Pacific Rim Coast in Sterling, Virginia. "We don't think...
Toward "Economic Democracy"
Gordon L. Anderson is executive director of Paragon House Publishers and secretary-general of the Professors World Peace Academy. Among his many publications are the books Morality and Religion in Liberal Democratic Societies and The Family in Global...
Ultralight-Aircraft Pilots Teach Refuge-Reared Cranes to Migrate
Ann Geracimos is a writer with The Washington Times. It's easy enough to fall in love with a whooping crane. Just don't try to kiss one. No matter how enamored they become, humans aren't supposed to get close to the breed--at least when humans are...
Why Global Transformation and Not Globalization
George Kaloudis is Professor and Director of History and Government at Rivier College in Nashua, New Hampshire. The term globalization is a highly charged one. The strong reactions, both positive and negative, that globalization often invites are...