The World and I

World and I is an encyclopedic journal that includes world news; developments in science, the arts and philosophy; book reviews; and photo essays. Since it was founded in 1986, it is printed monthly. The journal is published by Washington Times Corp.Subjects for World and I include science; literature and literary reviews; food and cooking; art; travel and tourism; politics; philosophy; music and musical instruments; drama and theatre. The editor is Steve Osmond.

Articles from Vol. 12, No. 3, March

`Airport Art' Strikes Again!
Airline passenger beware! Those intriguing artifacts in that inviting airport "gallery" just may not be the real thing. I was in the heart of Africa, face to face with one of life's eternal enigmas. Or rather, I was in an airport in the heart of...
`All Ahh We Is One'
Carnival in Trinidad and Tobago During the two days before Ash Wednesday, Carnival is celebrated all over the islands of Trinidad and Tobago. The center stage is in Port of Spain. People of every age, race, and circumstance participate, and strangers...
Ancient People, Modern Promise
EMBARKING ON A NEW DESTINY, THE INUIT OF CANADA'S EASTERN ARCTIC WILL SOON CLAIM A LAND OF THEIR OWN. "I used to think that people never died," remarked 58-year-old Joanasi Solomonie, an Inuit social worker in the remote arctic village of Cape Dorset....
Congress and Common Sense
Congressional leaders will work harder to communicate with the American people. The 105th Congress includes the first successive Republican majorities since the 1920s: a time beyond memory of most living Americans. The continuation of GOP control...
Cycles Make the World Go Round
In both natural phenomena and human endeavors, cyclical variations are amazingly wide-ranging in scope and profound in influence. We tend to think of our daily lives as proceeding more or less linearly in time and space. But cyclical changes are...
Divided Government: Will It Work
As they consider their legislative strategies for this year and beyond, President Bill Clinton and the Republican majority in Congress must sort out the different messages of the 1996 elections. Clinton was the first Democratic president since Franklin...
Doing Time Chills Crime
The FBI recently released data showing that serious crimes decreased in 1996, continuing a pattern that began in 1992. This might satisfy the statisticians who detect an improving trend, but it won't calm the fears of most Americans. Indeed, polls...
El Nino Fidencio
Celebrating Mexico's Folk Healer Brakes screech as the 4 A.M. train, bound for Monterrey some three hours to the south, rumbles its way out of town. Yellow light from the freighter's headlamps sends shadows dancing against the adobe walls of this...
Enduring Jazz Delights
Braff, Mance, and Golson With careers beginning in the fifties, three gifted jazz musicians are thrilling today's fans with some very special recordings. Over the past twenty years or so, we have witnessed the passing of the great pioneers of...
Enzymes at the Extreme
Derived from microbes that thrive in surprisingly hostile environments, newly discovered biological catalysts promise to revolutionize industrial processes. For centuries, people have enlisted the aid of microbial entities to cater to their needs...
Fujimori Hangs Tough
When an obscure guerrilla group, the Tupac Amaru, stormed the Japanese ambassador's residence in a posh Lima suburb a week before Christmas and took 700 guests hostage, the first question asked was, how could this happen? Still, no one should have...
Gold: Been There, Done That
Federal Reserve Board Chairman Alan Greenspan shook up global markets when, in his December speech to the American Enterprise Institute, he referred to the possibility of "irrational exuberance" in the stock market. But buried in that speech was another...
Grounded on Ice
The Inuit Struggle to Preserve Their Values The little road to nowhere winds out of the Baffin Island village of Iqaluit into the arctic tundra, a tentative encroachment that quickly surrenders to the frozen wilderness. The treeless hills around...
Harbinger of Spring
It is mid-March, somewhere in the mid-Atlantic states. Little, if any, snow is on the ground. But a person who ventures forth at dusk may hear the sound of distant sleighbells. In fact, it is a chorus of tiny frogs: spring peepers. Literary scholar...
Invisible Ink?
A collection that includes newly discovered, previously unpublished stories chronicles Ralph Ellison's early literary development. The first time I read Ralph Ellison's Invisible Man was in 1962, ten years after its original publication, when I...
Is Legalized Gambling Good Economics for States?
Casinos are good business, say their proponents. Case studies show that legal casino gaming can increase tourism, employment, sales of noncasino goods, and tax revenues. In Nevada, gaming employs 211,000, or 24.41 percent of the workforce. Direct annual...
Is Legalized Gambling Worth the Costs?
Legalized gambling has been used to finance various public works and private nonprofit institutions such as hospitals, colleges, and local school systems in America from the time of the landing of the first settlers. The method employed at that time...
Is Modern Literature Unique?
From all directions we are overwhelmed today by categorical statements about the decline of literature in all its traditional forms and the urgent need to fashion a new mode of literary sensibility, one appropriate to an age dominated by cataclysmic...
Jerusalem: Besieged by the Sacred
Ten measures of suffering were sent by God upon the world. Nine of them fell on Jerusalem. --A Hebrew proverb The dew which descends upon Jerusalem is a remedy for every sickness, because it is from the gardens of Paradise. --Excerpt from...
Kirov Academy Strikes Gold
Ballet School Boasts Two Varna Winners Having two students win gold at Varna may seem like a miracle, but to Yelena Vinogradova it just shows the depth of the Kirov tradition. Dance is meant to be a transcendent experience, lifting both performer...
Letters to the Editor
Moral Education about Sex To the Editor: In contemporary society, the most glaring assaults on intrinsic moral worth and dignity are a result of popular sexual attitudes and behavior, as Gracie Hsu's article, "Revolt of the Virgins," suggested...
Medical Marijuana
It's Effective and Compassionate by Arnold Trebach A rare event occurred on Election Day last year. Arizonans and Californians rejected a key part of Washington's drug war: the ban on doctors' recommending to patients potentially helpful drugs...
On Target for Carnegie Hall
AT A KIBBUTZ IN ISRAEL, LESSONS GLEANED FROM ARCHERY GROOM ASPIRING STRING SOLOISTS FOR THE STAGE. "Here--like this," said Alex Lachter softly, almost in a murmur. Leaning slightly forward, he gently placed his hand on Jaana Ronkko's elbow, adjusting...
Peru Held Hostage
TERROR IN SOUTH AMERICA UNITED STATES--The message of the Tupac Amaru rebels ... holding hostages in Peru is clear. These are ruthless Marxist revolutionaries seeking to revive their fading movement. They say they want a release of comrades now...
Rooted in Real Life
Examining Ellison's stories against the backdrop of his life yields a deeper understanding of his art. Who knows where fiction and reality converge? Few novelists or short story writers say they do. Like many of his contemporaries, Ralph Ellison...
Settled by the Sea
PERCHED ON THE EASTERN EDGE OF THE NORTH AMERICAN CONTINENT, NEWFOUNDLAND OFFERS A BOUNTY OF WILDLIFE, BERRIES, GOOD FOOD, AND KINDRED FOLK. "A winter burial used to be an arduous affair," explained my driver, Greg Day, as we slowly pulled past...
Silver & Wood
MIAO FESTIVALS IN GUIZHOU, CHINA The Miao of southwest China are one of the country's largest ethnic groups. About half of the four million Miao in China live in Guizhou Province. Called Hmong in-other countries, they are sometimes divided into...
Sunlight Brightens Our Energy Future
New technologies could make solar power a conventional energy source within the next decade. For nearly 40 years, solar power technology has been the holy grail for those in search of the perfect energy source. Its fuel, sunlight, is certainly plentiful....
The $130 Billion CFC Shakedown
Major media organs like to trumpet their commitment to reporting "all the news that's fit to print." But Americans--indeed people the world over--are paying dearly for the mainstream media's failure to provide balanced coverage of an environmental...
The Family Income Conundrum
Paradoxically, real median family income is rising while real median weekly earnings are falling. Last fall, the Census Bureau announced that real median family income had increased in 1995 for the second time in a row. At the same time, the...
The Incumbency Encumbrance
A negative if little-understood influence on the quality of public service today is a phenomenon known as the incumbency curve. The incumbency curve analysis shows that extended exposure to the Washington political scene by elected representatives...
The Inflation of Jasper Johns
Vast retrospectives have become the norm, even when unwarranted. Witness the touring Jasper Johns show. Is size the measure of the artist these days? Or to put it another way, if a major museum is organizing a retrospective exhibition of a prominent...
The Most Crucial Issues
Americans have begun to evaluate governmental policy on welfare, education, and health care in terms of how it affects their families. Would you die for a balanced budget? Would you die for campaign finance reform? For term limits? Would you die...
The Ohio Initiative on Casino Gambling
For a handful of high-stakes players, the potential jackpot in bringing casino gambling to Ohio was sweet, indeed, and the time seemed right last fall to cash in. After all, gambling proponents reasoned, in recent years gaming had become a high-growth...
The President and the Vital Center
The president needs to advance an agenda for nonbureaucratic, activist government that can muster bipartisan support. On the eve of the 1996 election, Washington opinion leaders shared a powerful consensus that Bill Clinton was about to win a second...
The Rise of Casino Gaming
A Historical and Ethical Perspective In 1984, all forms of gambling (lotteries, race tracks, casinos, and other forms of legalized betting) accounted for less than $15 billion in revenues. In 1995, these gaming activities generated $55.3 billion...
The Screenwriter's Quandary
Majors versus Independents "BOFFO BLOCKBUSTER ACTIONEER!" "SIDE-SPLITTING COMEDY!" "INTIMATE EXPLORATION OF FAMILIAL SACRIFICE." "NOVELISTIC, INTRICATE TALE OF MURDER, MYSTERY, AND INCEST." While the first two headlines clamorously shout out...
Toward the Light
"Color to me is a key to life," says upper New York State artist Katharine McKenna. Indeed, vivid color--along with an almost musical treatment of nuanced tones and interconnecting lines and structure--is the hallmark of her work. The musical comparison...
True to His Observations
Devoted to gathering accurate astronomical data since the eighth grade, William Tifft has confounded orthodox astronomy with his discovery of anomalies and patterns that support a cosmology based on three-dimensional time. Paying attention to details...
Vote `No' on Issue 1
Without a doubt, our biggest challenges in Ohio and America are caused by the breakdown of the family. Particularly in our urban areas, we are already fighting an uphill battle to keep families together, keep kids in school, and keep drugs, weapons,...
Vote `Yes' on Ohio Issue 1
Ohio voters can step up to the plate and hit an economic grand slam. A "yes" vote for Issue 1 on Nov. 5 would touch these four bases: * More than 21,000 good-paying jobs in northern and southern Ohio--about the same number as General Motors jobs...
When Daybreak Comes
Folktales from the Tumbuka of Eastern Zambia During the African winter months (May to early August), it gets very on the Lundazi plateau. This is part of the homeland of Zambia's Tumbuka people, who also live in northern Malawi. There is a bird...
You Are Here
Water Towers and Community Identity Any pilot who has gone off course while "flying on visuals" knows what it is to dip from the clouds to reconnoiter the earth. To search for an orienting feature in the landscape below, a landmark that says, "You...