The World and I

World and I is an encyclopedic journal that includes world news; developments in science, the arts and philosophy; book reviews; and photo essays. Since it was founded in 1986, it is printed monthly. The journal is published by Washington Times Corp.Subjects for World and I include science; literature and literary reviews; food and cooking; art; travel and tourism; politics; philosophy; music and musical instruments; drama and theatre. The editor is Steve Osmond.

Articles from Vol. 14, No. 10, October

Aftermath of the Balkan War, the Rise of Anti-Americanism, and the End of Democracy in Russia
Vladimir Shlapentokh is professor of history at Michigan State University. The author wishes to thank Joshua Woods for his editorial contribution to this article. Whatever the final appraisal of the Balkan war and its place in history, clearly this...
An African-American Volunteer in Nicaragua
From a career perspective, compared to many of the friends I had grown up with in south-central Los Angeles, I was doing relatively well. I was comfortable with my accomplishments as a university-educated African American and the fact that I had not...
An Undersea Recluse in the Limelight
The American lobster, distinguished by its enormous claws and muscular abdomen, would be living in quiet oblivion on the seafloor if it weren't for the eagerness with which we humans seek it out for food and research. Imagine life in colonial New...
A Sensible Y2K Kitchen
With so many conflicting opinions about what to expect at the turn of the millennium, here are a few tips on how to feed your family at that time. Are you confused by all the apocalyptic talk as we near the year 2000? While everyone else has been...
A Toast to Poe
Sometime before dawn, a stranger creeps into the brick-walled graveyard of Baltimore's Westminster Church. At the grave of Edgar Allan Poe, the black-clad figure kneels and bows his head as if in prayer, and then sets a bottle of Martell cognac in...
A Wild Irishman in the Hinterlands
An eccentric irish professor at a small college in wisconsin rocks the intellectual boat by pushing for higher standards and recognition of his own accomplishments. There is no one speaking up for eccentric faculty on college campuses today. Discussions...
BNIM Architects
'Designing a Better World' The line between art and architecture can sometimes be a tenuous one, where technical definitions and rule of habit often seem to win out over aesthetic considerations. After all, many architectural firms will tell you...
Brecht Is Back!
Once an influential figure of the worldwide stage, Brecht has returned as an object of fascination to Europe's intelligentsia (at least on the Continent). To the new generation of writers and directors in Britain, Marxist dramatist Bertolt Brecht--whose...
Buddha in His Time and Ours
Charles Hallisey is John L. Loeb Associate Professor of the Humanities in Sanskrit and Indian Studies at Harvard University. Who was the Buddha? Much is assumed in what might seem to be a small choice about the tense of the verb in the question,...
Buddha: In His Time and Ours
``I am not yet I am." In these few words lie hidden the secret and the paradox of man. "What's that?" you might ask. It means at any moment, as we are now, as we are in the future, we are incomplete beings without a living relationship with the divine....
Can the Mullahs Keep Control?
Last July 8, student protests began in Tehran. They lasted nearly a week, before Iranian authorities succeeded in bringing them to an end. The protests themselves were part of a power struggle that has been ongoing since the 1997 election of Iranian...
'Cassandra' of Political Science
In early September 1939, 12-year-old Samuel Huntington was at his grandparents' coastal summer home swimming, sailing, and savoring the salty breeze and warm sunshine on the beaches and granite hills of Massachusetts' Plymouth Bay. Then the radio...
Changing Face
China at Fifty Since the days of Marco Polo, China has intrigued outsiders, luring adventurous travelers with its mystique and rewarding visitors with its grand scenery. I first visited China in the early 1980s, shortly after its much-heralded reopening...
Children and Families
As editor of the Family Times, I have the privilege and good fortune of working on issues that are dear to my heart: children and families. I am grateful to work for the Washington Times, which saw the merit in creating such a section. This June, the...
China and the World
Events in Yugoslavia have reinforced the PRC's determination to exercise greater leadership against U.S. "hegemony." Since the bombing of the Chinese Embassy in Belgrade in May, leaders of the People's Republic of China (PRC) have embarked on a...
China's Environment in the Balance
The People's Republic of China faces serious challenges that include protecting its environment and ecological resources from further deterioration while maintaining rapid economic growth and industrial development. China is home to more than 1.2...
China's Mixed Economy
Despite the free-market progress since 1978, the state remains heavily involved in the Chinese economy. Just over two decades ago, China launched its ambitious economic reform program under the new leadership of Deng Xiaoping. Since 1978, its economy...
Chinese Military Modernization: An Assessment
Dennis J. Blasko served as an Army attache in Beijing and Hong Kong from 1992 to 1996. Chinese military modernization is out of sync with the late twentieth century. Misperceptions by both Chinese and foreigners contribute to this condition. Many...
Chopin, Poland's Musical Voice
A Sesquicentennial Tribute Frederic Chopin has long been regarded as the epitome of the suffering Romantic artist and an icon of Polish culture. Now a more complex view of him is emerging. His friend Balzac described him as "more Polish than...
Concerns and Misconceptions
Dispelling Nicaraguan stereotypes about racial minorities in the United States was a challenge. I welcomed opportunities to explain (especially to those who lacked access to responsible Western media or television programming) that there are regular...
Conduct Your Own Poe Investigation
Edgar Allan Poe was well known for the macabre vision of his short stories and poems. Though gothic literature, such as Mary Shelley's Frankenstein (1818), was commonplace in his day, Poe was an innovator. He is considered the father of the detective...
Country Goes Pop!
While the country-music industry has been unable to launch enough new stars, some of its hottest acts are playing the glitz-and-glam world of pop for all it's worth. On the surface, the country-music industry looks like it has never been more prosperous...
From Mao to Deng
The revolutionary zeal that characterized Mao's programs was transformed into pragmatism under Deng Xiaoping. In 1945, shortly before the Japanese surrender, Gen. Albert Wedemeyer, the representative in China of the Joint Chiefs of Staff and senior...
From Mao to Deng: The Tragedy of Tiananman
On April 15, 1989, a disgraced former secretary-general of the CCP named Hu Yaobang died. Plucked from the ranks and elevated to be Deng Xiaoping's heir-apparent, Hu had been dismissed after flirting with the idea of greater democracy for China. But...
Hispanization of the U.S
On a blazing-hot June weekend, throngs of tourists flocked to a local street festival. Some fairgoers eyed the mouthwatering fare on sale-- pupusas, carne asada, and platanos fritos--trying to decide what to eat for lunch. Others gulped coconut milk...
Lighting the Way
A Myanmar Journey Scrambling from the ferry's bow, I stepped onto the narrow plank. The precarious walkway bounced and wobbled as it supported my weight above the expanse of the Irrawaddy's muddy riverbank. Dry land was a meandering scratch of path...
Panama Canal: Changing of the Guard
Sometime in mid-December, in a ceremony that probably will occur on the back terrace of the elegant and imposing Panama Canal Commission building in Balboa Heights, the American flag will come down. If past ceremonies are a guide, a white symbolic...
Peace from Blood
Minnesota's Pipestone Quarries The earth was red with the blood of the dead. Rocks were stained crimson, and shouts of hate echoed on the wind. The nations of the earth were at war, and the law of the Great Spirit was forgotten. The Great Spirit...
Recommended Y2K Food List
While this list primarily draws from the Greek and Bulgarian foods, you will note that I have thrown in a few universal comfort foods like coffee, tea, and chocolate, as well as wine and champagne for toasting the New Year. (And don't forget a pair...
Shoe Boxes of Love
Prepared by san diego schoolchildren with love, shoe boxes full of emotional first aid are hand delivered by world emergency relief to the kosovar refugees in albania. Six-year-old Shannon is slowly walking down the aisle of a discount store in...
Silver Pellets and Remote Programmers
While computer professionals have not found a comprehensive cure for the Y2K disease, they have developed many partial solutions that taken together can render the Y2K bug impotent, saving brute-force software remediation by overseas services as a...
Student Protests in Iran
Iran rocks UNITED STATES--The demonstrations that have rocked Iran hit day six, only [July 14] it was the mullahs' turn to send their supporters into the streets. No matter. This most strategic of countries isn't likely to be the same; these protests,...
Tapestry of Horrors
Mystical Beliefs of the Chiloe Islanders Surrounded by a gale-driven sea and stricken by the strongest earthquakes ever recorded, Chile's Chiloe Island is a place of terrible tales. As people gather around their fires to escape the clammy cold,...
Teacher from the Valley of Elqui
The legacy of Gabriela Mistral Marie-Lise Gazarian-Gautier is professor of Spanish and Latin American literature and coordinator of the graduate program in Spanish at St. John's University, Jamaica, New York, where the Gabriela Mistral Scholarship...
The JFK Jr. Feeding Frenzy
On a lazy, humid July afternoon a hastily organized press conference had just gotten under way at the Pentagon. No less than two rear admirals, an Air Force colonel, a lieutenant colonel, and a Pentagon spokesman had assembled to tell the nation a...
The Living Building
In the rapidly dawning era of necessary environmental responsibility, architecture will flourish if it replaces the haughty metaphor of buildings as machines with the holistic metaphor of buildings as flowers. We do not seek to imitate nature, but...
The Mysterious Death of E.A. Poe
Baltimore's Restless Poet The following letter was found in an old trunk in Paris by a colleague of mine. It was written by a French police investigator, one Monsieur Dauphin, who had apparently become acquainted with Edgar Allan Poe while on holiday...
The Poe Society
The following is an interview with Jeffrey Savoye, secretary and treasurer of the Edgar Allan Poe Society of Baltimore. William Connery: In your personal view, how did Poe die? Jeffrey Savoye: It seems that the more you study it, the muddier...
The Suez Canal: A Contrast
Egypt's famed waterway is a canal of a different color. Opened in 1869, the 118-mile Suez Canal was owned and run by a private firm until 1956. Suez Canal Company (SCC) shares were owned at first mostly by Frenchmen and the Ottoman Empire. But the...
The Walking Wounded
Following her Great War trilogy, Barker continues to explore the conflict in our personal and social lives. Michael Thorpe is the author of Siegfried Sassoon: A Critical Study; he has extensively reviewed contemporary British and Commonwealth fiction...
This Land Is Your Land, This Land Is My Land
But Who Owns the Coal Gas? While Lee's surrender to Grant at Appomattox in April 1865 brought the Civil War to a close, it also signaled the opening of the American West. So little was known of the vast area west of the Missouri River that maps...
Two Sides of the Screen
Richard Breyer is chair of radio and film at the Newhouse School of Public Communications at Syracuse University. Last Sunday our home was occupied by the media. One child sat at his computer mesmerized by the battle he was fighting on the screen...
Van Dyck Rediscovered
Born four hundred years ago, Anthony Van Dyck was a child prodigy who during his lifetime and often since was overshadowed by Rubens; but now three exhibitions bring his unique genius to light. In 1990, when the National Gallery of Art in Washington,...
War Clouds over Asia?
Once again, the world has discovered that the Taiwan Strait is a highly combustible place where the problems of an era past (Chinese civil war frozen by the Cold War) intersect with the problems of the future (coping with the rise of China and with...
Where Is China Headed?
The Special Report in the Current Issues section this month raises serious issues concerning China's prospects and future behavior. I shall attempt to deal with two of these issues: whether China is likely to become the kind of threat the Soviet Union...
Where Is China Headed?
The People's Republic of China has come a long way from the fiery Marxist rhetoric of Mao Zedong and the Cultural Revolution. Today the PRC steadfastly follows the path of economic liberalization and wheels and deals with Western capitalists. Shanghai...