The World and I

World and I is an encyclopedic journal that includes world news; developments in science, the arts and philosophy; book reviews; and photo essays. Since it was founded in 1986, it is printed monthly. The journal is published by Washington Times Corp.Subjects for World and I include science; literature and literary reviews; food and cooking; art; travel and tourism; politics; philosophy; music and musical instruments; drama and theatre. The editor is Steve Osmond.

Articles from Vol. 12, No. 5, May

Adapt and Flourish
The Opera Theatre of Saint Louis The Opera Theatre of Saint Louis has taken a thrust stage, promising young singers, and a mission to educate and combined them into a proven formula for international success. Twenty-two years ago Richard Gaddes,...
A National Sales Tax
A national sales tax would reward individual decisions to work, save, and invest. Each and every year, we pay a steep price for the folly that is the income tax. The current tax system forces the American people to accept * extravagantly high...
Anchorage Arts
Shaped by the majestic natural environment, traditional Native influences, and an indomitable pioneer spirit, Anchorage's arts scene is a surprisingly vital mix. To the uneducated, Anchorage, Alaska, may appear to be just a convenient transportation...
Asia's Rusty Linchpin: Pakistan at 50
For half a century, Pakistan has careered through civil wars, rampant corruption, tyrannical rule, massive migration, lawlessness, chronic firefights on its city streets, and wars with a neighbor that can outspend and outgun it 10-1. The country nonetheless...
Chemical Chokehold
Azerbaijan Confronts the Soviet Legacy of Pollution The skies are blue and bright these days in Sumgait (pronounced Sumgay-it). Especially on Sundays. A satellite of Azerbaijan's capital city of Baku, Sumgait is beautifully situated on the Caspian...
China: The Big Picture
The Photography of Lois Conner With a large-format camera and a passionate eye, Conner has captured the timeless nature of the Chinese landscape in grand style. "China is really where I became a photographer," says Lois Conner, who has been traveling...
Coming from the Earth
Foodways of the Tumbuka of Eastern Zambia During the British colonial period, in the rural district of Lundazi in northern Rhodesia (now Zambia), a village headman named Kakoba was summoned to a meeting with the district commissioner. As was customary...
Do We Need the Parental Rights Amendment?
What is the proper relationship among the state, parents, and children? If the state (in the form of its judges, schools, social workers, or other bureaucrats) and parents disagree about the nurture, discipline, or education of children, whose opinion...
Hornet's Nest
CHARLOTTE'S DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE It was Gen. Earl Cornwallis who first described the strong personality trait of residents of south-central North Carolina. In 1780, the commander of British forces in the Revolutionary War had brought a battalion...
Ireland's WESTERN WILDS
THE EMERALD ISLE'S WESTERN COUNTIES ARE RENOWNED FOR THEIR IMPOSING BEAUTY AND TIES TO IRISH LITERATURE. I will arise and go now, and go to Innisfree, And a small cabin build there, of clay and wattles made: Nine bean-rows will I...
Keep It Simple: A Flat Tax
If it's implemented, individual taxpayers could file their tax returns on a postcard. The idea of scrapping our income tax code and replacing it with a flat tax received enormous publicity during the 1996 campaign, and a few primary election contests...
LAJJA (Shame)
A Bangladeshi novelist indicts religious extremism in the controversial novel that led to her exile. Most writers are aware of their intentions, conscious of the debates that will undoubtedly arise if they publish provocative writings. Salman Rushdie...
Letters to the Editor
Germany and the Scientologists To the Editor: Thank you for the opportunity to respond to Mr. Kaplan's book review ["How Hitler Conquered Germany," p. 259]. Quite frankly, I am disturbed that Mr. Kaplan perpetuates the allegations made by...
Let the V-Chips Fall Where They May
A battle for television is brewing between the V-chip and a movielike rating system. Will Big Brother have the final say? Is television in need of a "morals implant"? A much-heralded 1996 UCLA study implied that TV may be reforming itself, noting...
Living Treasures
Kite Flying and Traditional Korean Handicrafts Year-round, tradespeople in Korea (and in other Asian countries) may be happily flying kites while they wait for potential customers. In fact, kite flying has long held a special place in the Korean...
Melodies on Wings
Fascinating to the listener, birdsong is a surprisingly complex communication system with similarities to human speech. On a tree by a river a little tomtit Sang "Willow, titwillow, titwillow!" And I said to him, "Dicky-bird, why...
Michael Lucero
Michael Lucero's work can no longer be dismissed as just another example of ceramic sculpture with its roots in sixties California art shaped by eclectic New York influences. After twenty years, the New York artist's work is being reassessed in terms...
Nuclear Power: Blessing or Blight?
After 40 years of commercial use and much controversy, will atomic energy remain a viable resource for the twenty-first century? In the mid seventies, nuclear energy--the energy generated by the splitting of atomic nuclei--was generally held in...
Parental Rights
An Overview The issue of parental rights in the face of government intervention is not a new one in this country(1); it has simply become a more burning issue as the intrusions have become more pronounced. As long ago as 1923, in a case called Meyer...
Reconnecting America
CLAIMING ABANDONED RAIL LINES FOR COMMUNITY USE, RAILS-TO-TRAILS CONSERVANCY IS CREATING AN OFF-ROAD NETWORK ACROSS AMERICA. I have lived in Washington, D.C., for nearly two months, and for the first time complete strangers are saying hello to me....
Renewed Promise
CORI'S FESTIVE FLAG-WAVERS It is a warm Sunday in May, and residents of the ancient village of Cori, Italy, just south of Rome, have bedecked their town with flowers and brilliant banners; Now dressed in sixteenth-century garb, the townsfolk murmur...
Republicans and the Education Debate
In his State of the Union address and the budget message that followed, President Clinton chose education policy as one of the major initiatives for his second term. This may or may not be good news for the country, but it is surely bad news for the...
Seeing the Waves Within
Louis de Broglie, a twentieth-century French physicist, formulated the radical notion that moving particles of matter can behave like waves. The world of science is a community of minds whose backgrounds and interests are as varied as the human...
Seen through a Window
VIEWING CHILE'S REGIONAL CHARACTER Windows are to buildings as eyes are to living creatures: They allow us to assess the nature of the building and those who dwell in it. People use to display things to themselves and o those passing by. They may...
Subliminal Sight
Five Belgian Moderns An exhibition shows how, between the 1880s and the 1970s, five Belgian painters laid the groundwork for and later redefined Expressionism and Surrealism. If you were asked to name the epicenters of early Modern art, Belgium...
Surgery without Knives
A new treatment for breast cancer will use a stream of pulsed laser light to activate cell-destroying reactions by drugs that naturally concentrate in the tumor. A laboratory technician approached me last year, saying, "You have to help me convince...
The Death of Deng
DEATH OF AN EMPEROR UNITED STATES--Deng's status as a kind of Communist emperor explains why his death is such a momentous event.... While Deng's power, like Mao's, came from the barrel of a gun, the Party's inner workings have improved the past...
The Last Kamikaze
FROM SUICIDE PILOT TO OLYMPIC JUDGE, THE LIFE OF EIJI IMAZATO PARALLELS THE POSTWAR TRANSFORMATION OF JAPAN. It began with a photograph. A faded black-and-white print, turned sepia over time, showing five young boys, laughing, the focus of their...
The Parental Rights Amendment
Affirming Parental Rights Who should decide what is in the best interest of a child? Ask this question to any cross-section of American society, and you are likely to hear one answer over and over: parents. The security of their parental rights...
The Role of Exchange Rates
Because the many currencies of the world "float" in value against one another, governments achieve greater freedom in monetary policy. If you were planning a trip to London today, one of the first questions you'd ask your travel agent is: What will...
The U.S. Tax Code: End It or Mend It?
There are proposals for improving the current tax system, but they have not been heavily publicized. The U.S. tax structure is far from perfect, but there are people who think scrapping our current income-based tax system would be a huge mistake....
The War against War Correspondents
For the foreign correspondents of my generation, covering the Vietnam War marked our epiphany as a profession. It was in Southeast Asia that we discovered that our government could lie to protect a doomed war and that even good countries sometimes...
Unleashing Tax Reform
A consensus has formed among those who tax and those who are taxed: America's tax system is needlessly complex, unfair, and in urgent need of reform. Consider these facts: The federal income tax has a top rate of 39.6 percent. There are state and...
Using Audits to Intimidate
Allegations of politically inspired audits of tax-exempt organizations have swirled in the media for months. But the question remains, did it or didn't it? Meaning, of course, did the tax-gathering Internal Revenue Service really send forth agents...
Violence and the Brain
Highly impulsive aggressive behavior may result from neurologic abnormalities related to injury, illness, chemical imbalance, or genetic defects. Tell me, ye judges of our moral sins, where madness ends, and sanity begins? (*) It began again,...
What Is a `Value-Added Tax,' Anyway?
The ideal VAT is a system that applies one tax rate to all business activities. The term value-added tax may be a proper noun to many people. The shorter version --"VAT"-- certainly is. Both are labels for tax systems that American tourists and...
What's Wrong with Parental Rights?
On November 5, 1996, Colorado voters rejected a proposed Parental Rights Amendment (PRA) to their state constitution. What began as a seemingly innocuous statement became the most hotly contested issue on a crowded ballot. Guaranteeing parents the...
Why Shakespeare Is a Hard Sell in English Departments
"The Shakespeare File: What English Majors Are Really Studying," a recent study conducted by the National Alumni Forum, confirms what those of us who teach in English departments already knew--namely, that far too many colleges and universities are...
Word Wars
In Flannery O'Connor's short story "The Displaced Person," Mrs. Shortley, the wife of a tenant farmer, has a morbid fantasy about an encounter between "her" English and the language of a Polish family who has come to work on the farm: It came to Mrs....
World Freedom: Growing but Fragile
As 1997 began, more people were living in democratic societies than at any time in history. Yet in one-third of the world's democratic countries, a weak rule of law, corruption, ethnic conflict, and other internal pressures continued to erode basic...