The World and I

World and I is an encyclopedic journal that includes world news; developments in science, the arts and philosophy; book reviews; and photo essays. Since it was founded in 1986, it is printed monthly. The journal is published by Washington Times Corp.Subjects for World and I include science; literature and literary reviews; food and cooking; art; travel and tourism; politics; philosophy; music and musical instruments; drama and theatre. The editor is Steve Osmond.

Articles from Vol. 14, No. 8, August

Allons Au Zydeco
Southwest Louisiana's Creole Music photographed by Rick Olivier On Saturday nights in southwest Louisiana, a weekly ritual unfolds in the bars and clubs along the "crawfish circuit." Working men and women exchange their work clothes for plumed...
All the High Buildings
Monte Carlo Is Not Like Other Cities The German couple cross Europe intent on tasting the charm of Monte Carlo during their vacation. Their imaginations are filled with visions of gleaming sports cars and fragrant flowers tumbling over stucco walls,...
A Rainbow of Rices
Uncle ben's and basmati move over. ordinary rice is out, and trendy but ancient rice varieties are on the increase in american kitchens. Potatoes were the staple starch component of my midwestern childhood diet. When encountered in the occasional...
Between Three Mountains
The modern chinese city of kashgar is a faceless, noisy conglomerate of municipal buildings, ugly hotels, and apartment blocks, interspersed with remnants of an ancient city conquered and reconquered through the ages. On the way to Kashgar, at the...
Can the Kurds Have a Homeland?
It was an extraordinary scene--and one that the world was definitely meant to see: Inside an executive jet, several masked men surrounded a bulky, mustachioed figure, blindfolded and handcuffed to his seat but visibly sweating and grimacing. "Abdullah...
Chinagate: Network Blind Spot?
For years, the networks doggedly pursued foreign-policy scandals of previous administrations from Iran-Contra to Iraqgate. But in the wake of a scandal- fatigued public (and perhaps press), the passion for breaking stories seems to have deadened. ...
Darwin, Complexity, and the Problem of Design
In his splendid article, "DarwinOs Origin Transforms Culture," Peter Graham refers to studies by biochemist Michael Behe showing that an individual cell is so complex and arranged so interdependently that it never could have arisen from a process of...
Darwin's Origin Transforms Culture
A Naturalist's Life Journey Charles Darwin was the second son and fifth of six children in the family of Dr. Robert Darwin and his wife, Susannah Wedgwood. From birth, he was securely situated in the most prosperous and progressive stratum of the...
Dean of the U.S. Senate
###Robert R. Selle As a 40-year-old circuit judge in rural South Carolina in late 1941, Strom Thurmond was exempt from military service. But the first day war was declared on Germany, Thurmond threw down his gavel and volunteered to pick up a rifle....
Familiar Exotic
Gay Night Out Saturday night in Koror felt like V-J day. All of Palau's inhabitants seemed to be ready to party. The parking lot of the Paradise Club was overflowing and jubilant banners proclaimed that a beauty queen would be chosen that night....
Four Keys to Success
The Wisconsin Miracle Is your state economy growing as fast as it could be? And is your state government providing the encouragement needed to help foster this growth? If you want to know more, read on. Over the past decade, several state economies...
Frederick Busch's the Night Inspector
In The Night Inspector the prolific Frederick Busch returns to the same genre of historical novel as his successful The Mutual Friend (1978), which re-created the Victorian world of Charles Dickens. Busch, who is the Edgar Fairchild Professor of Literature...
From This Month's Menu
The conflict in the Balkans has focused attention on the role of NATO without the Warsaw Pact to confront. In this issue we examine that role and the Balkan conflict from several perspectives. In Epitaph for a Commonwealth, part of a Currents in Modern...
Grim Treasures
Macabre Tales of Edinburgh's Old Town photographed by Maxine Hicks Visitors to today's Edinburgh admire the refined proportions of the New Town. But up until reconstruction was completed in the eighteenth century, the heart of Scotland's capital...
Hitchcock and the Censors
Through collaboration and clashes with Hollywood's Production Code censors, Alfred Hitchcock--born a hundred years ago--developed the art of suggestion into powerful cinema. In the 1930s, in a drab, unmarked building in the West End of London, the...
How the Midwest Has Won
Automakers and other manufacturers have adopted new technologies and improved product quality to a remarkable degree. If, as a "thought experiment," we were to bring forward to today an observer from a typical midwestern town of 1984, he would likely...
Ingres, Reluctant Portraitist of an Era
Although the great French painter held portrait work in low esteem, a touring exhibition demonstrates he created some of the most memorable likenesses in the history of art. "What man has better painted the nineteenth century? The gallery of portraits...
Japanese Law and Trade Relations
To the Editor: Ever since Matthew Galbraith Perry signed a treaty with the Tokugawa Shogunate on March 31, 1854, ending the self-imposed isolation of Japan, the trade relationship between Japan and the United States has been adversarial. [On the...
Korea's Best-Kept Secret
Seoul's Ch'angdokkung Palace The only Korean palace remaining virtually intact, Ch'angdok, built in 1394 and just now being appreciated by the West, recalls the grandeur and scope of the Choson dynasty. New visitors to Seoul are amazed by not...
Kosova: Is It a Just War?
A Moral Imperative Fifty-five years ago President Franklin Delano Roosevelt prayed for the American and Allied troops storming the beaches of Normandy. His D-day invocation evoked the just cause for which our soldiers were fighting. He said: "They...
Late-Night Gurus
Are Leno, Letterman, and Company moral barometers of our changing times, or merely obscene funnymen, milking tasteless jokes about public figures for all they're worth. "The Emperor has no clothes!" cried the little boy in the Hans Christian Andersen...
Laura Ingalls Wilder: Myth and Reality
A profile of Laura Ingalls Wilder No American children's book author has attained greater popularity or demonstrated longer staying power than Laura Ingalls Wilder. Since the publication of her first novel, Little House in the Big Woods, in 1932,...
Lights, Cameras-Cut!
"The house of every one is to him as his castle and fortress, as well for his defence against injury and violence, as for his repose." So observed an English court in 1604. With this ancient observation as a springboard, the Supreme Court held that...
Melville's Masquerade
This historical novel is an imaginative study and tribute to one of AmericaOs greatest authors, as well as an indictment of manOs inhumanity to man. The most significant irony in the history of any literature may well be the enormous gap between...
Memory of a Free Festival
Woodstock Thirty Years Later I arrived in San Francisco at the end of the summer of love in 1967 and stayed for six months in Haight-Ashbury. We would gather in Golden Gate Park for free concerts by the Grateful Dead and Jefferson Airplane. It was...
Military Discipline, Political Pressure, and the Post-Cold War World
No one wants to contemplate what would happen if America were to send its soldiers into a situation that they were unprepared to meet. We have done that more than once in our history. We do not care to do it again. Yet, we may be risking exactly that--not...
NATO Expansion: A Disaster in the Making
In 1983 the Professors World Peace Academy funded a project I had proposed: "The Fall of the Soviet Empire." The project was derided by most academics as propagandistic or delusional. Nonetheless we held a big international conference on the subject...
NATO Expansion, Russian Demise
By the time this issue goes to print, chances are the bombing in Yugoslavia will be over. NATO leaders are currently meeting with Serbian military commanders to work out the technical details of "when and how" their troops will withdraw from Kosovo....
Nmd: The Folly of 'Star Wars II'
In May the U.S. House of Representatives followed the lead of its Senate colleagues and passed the National Missile Defense Act of 1999. Known as the Cochran bill after its sponsor, Sen. Thad Cochran (R-Mississippi), this legislation states that it...
No Business without Show Business
Two new books account for Hollywood's domination of the film industry and entertainment's central role in our economy. Lloyd Eby, assistant senior editor in the Currents in Modern Thought section of The World & I , writes frequently on film...
Physician of the Streets
Turning back alleys into examination rooms and concrete steps into pews, dr. chi huang administers to the street children of la paz, bolivia. The law of the streets is to live or die. That is your choice. I want to survive. I want to live." This...
Righting the Balance
This engaging account of a half-century of American conservatism spotlights its pivotal figurs as well as the key organizations, strategists, and opinion shapers. Book Info:THE CONSERVATIVE REVOLUTION The Movement That Remade America Lee Edwards...
Sao Paulo: Urbanization Run Amok
America could learn much from the myriad difficulties now plaguing Sao Paulo, Brazil. With 21.4 million residents expected by the end of the year, the world's second- largest city (Mexico City is the largest) is caught up in a spiraling escalation...
Sapatq'ayn: Art of the Nez Perce Nation
Exhibits at the new Nez Perce National Historical Park in Idaho bring to light the remarkable artwork of talented Native American artists. "Art is everything; art is all around us," states artist Leroy Seth, who lives and works in the Nez Perce...
Soaring with the Sun
Sustained by the vision of a plane that can fly forever, a small band of pioneers has laid the foundation for solar-powered flying wings that may serve as communications relay stations and environmental monitoring platforms. According to legend,...
The Armored Pig
Relying on their strong suit of armor and their ability to eat almost anything, stay out of sight, and colonize waste habitats, armadillos have survived for 55 million years. As the sun disappears behind the horizon and numerous creatures settle...
The Idea War
American intellectual life after the Second World War was clearly dominated by a love of the Left. Book Info:TWILIGHT OF THE INTELLECTUALS Culture and Politics in the Era of the Cold War Hilton Kramer Publisher:Chicago: Ivan R. Dee, 1999 384 pp.,...
The Lights Dim on U.S. Nuclear Power
Driving north from California's Silicon Valley on Highway 680, past oak trees and over rolling green hills, the afternoon sun reflects from the distant silver dome of the Vallecitos nuclear reactor. That reactor, operated in the early 1960s and...
The 'New Nato' Creates Instability in Europe
The decision taken by NATO leaders in 1997 to invite Poland, Hungary, and the Czech Republic to join the alliance was a watershed event. For the first time, NATO undertook security responsibilities in central and eastern Europe. Although the alliance...
The Return of the Rust Belt
Back in the seventies, most experts gave up on the Rust Belt--the traditional center of American heavy industry located in the Midwest. They considered the region's double-digit unemployment rate, the big population losses, and the flat growth and...
The Tissue Master Delivers
By combining the interaction of synthetic materials with pharmaceuticals and living cells, chemical engineer Robert Langer has invented a multitude of techniques and devices for treating conditions ranging from diabetes to cancer. If Robert Langer...
Transistor's Kid Brother
Two very different energy-harnessing technologies, the silicon solar cell and the steam engine, may someday be ranked as having equal significance. Today the powerful legacy of James Watt's steam engine, a machine that converted the heat of burning...
Where the River Turns
The Great Railway Thai character is immediately evident, even from the open-sided observation car at the rear of the E&O Express. In Malaysia, the predominantly Muslim locals studiously ignored or gazed blankly at the tourists leaning from the...