The World and I

World and I is an encyclopedic journal that includes world news; developments in science, the arts and philosophy; book reviews; and photo essays. Since it was founded in 1986, it is printed monthly. The journal is published by Washington Times Corp.Subjects for World and I include science; literature and literary reviews; food and cooking; art; travel and tourism; politics; philosophy; music and musical instruments; drama and theatre. The editor is Steve Osmond.

Articles from Vol. 19, No. 9, September

All in All, Just Another Pic on the Wall: Display Dulls Remarkable Photos
Joanna Shaw-Eagle is a writer for The Washington Times. Unfortunately, the National Museum of Women in the Arts often neglects its institutional obligation to present artists' work attractively and informatively. A recent example is last winter's...
A Reevaluation of Richard Nixon
Thirty years after his resignation from office, President Richard Nixon is increasingly seen by scholars as a pivotal figure in American politics whose skillful pragmatism unwittingly gave rise to the current ideological clashes between Republicans...
Bringing Lost Pets Home: Implanted Chip Stores Owner's Contact Info
Ann Geracimos is a writer with The Washington Times. A pet owner's heart jumps at the thought of losing a companion animal. Imagine, then, how Deborah Robinson of Pasadena, Maryland, felt recently when she received a call from Anne Arundel County...
Distance Learning: Net-Savvy Universities Seeing Huge Enrollments
Ann Geracimos is a writer with The Washington Times. University of Maryland University College (UMUC) has gone the distance in its approach to distance learning. With a worldwide student body of 87,197, it is the largest public university in...
Europe's Special Military Skills Can Provide It Influence in U.S
Louis R. Golino is a writer with The Washington Times. A new report from a British think tank says that to enhance their influence in Washington and the world, European governments need to improve their military capabilities and develop their own...
Ham Radio: Amateur Operators Can Chat Worldwide
Christian Toto is a writer for The Washington Times. Maryland resident Murray Green has helped connect overseas soldiers with their families without ever leaving his home. Green reaches out to new friends in the military and all over the world via...
Heroes as Humans with Flaws
Karen Goldberg Goff is a writer for The Washington Times. Elevating important historical figures to hero status has come with consequences, as some real stories have been retold and repackaged into fun tales. Keep in mind that the stories are not...
How the Media Miss the Religion Story
John O'Sullivan is currently editor in chief of the National Interest, editor at large of National Review, and a senior fellow at the Nixon Center. He was editor in chief of United Press International at the writing of this article. [Editor's Note:...
In Search of Magic and Mystery in Tibet
Masha Nordbye is an award-winning photojournalists who last wrote for The World & I Online about the 300th anniversary of St. Petersburg, Russia. For centuries, Tibet has been wrapped in an aura of mystery, its very nature isolated from the...
Introduction
Ever since the Monroe Doctrine, the United States has regarded Latin America largely as U.S. "turf." It has been almost second nature for administrations in Washington, D.C., to intervene politically and militarily and to dominate economically in the...
Keeper of the Bournonville Magic: The Royal Danish Ballet
William Anthony is a writer and ballet teacher living in Denmark. His book on the Royal Danish Ballet will be published in autumn 2005 by the University Press of Florida. The Royal Danish Ballet has a unique position in the ballet world. It protects...
Left Behind: Estonia's Russians
Ben Barber has been a contributor to The World & I since the early 1990s. Tiny Estonia on the Baltic Sea has but 1.5 million people. Estonians speak a unique language understandable only to their cousins the Finns about 50 miles across the Gulf...
Media and Democracy in China
Kathy Hwang is the bureau chief for United Press International in Hong Kong. [Editor's Note: The following is an address that was presented at an international convocation of journalists sponsored by the World Media Association in February 2003.]...
Mexican Elections: Status Quo Kept, Democratic Process Suffers
Robert Buckman is a writer with The Washington Times. Voters opted for the status quo in three closely watched gubernatorial elections this past summer, but the strongest signal to this country's three major parties may have come from those who...
Nature Lives in His Light: Sanford R. Gifford's Legacy in World Travel
Joanna Shaw-Eagle is a writer for The Washington Times. Visitors first focus on Sanford R. Gifford's light-filled, smoothly brushed A Gorge in the Mountains (Kauterskill Clove), the centerpiece at the National Gallery of Art's exemplary exhibit...
Old Is New Again: Retro-Look Appliances Hark Back to the 1950s
Shelley Widhalm is a writer for The Washington Times. Carlos Silva was born the same year his Oxon Hill house was built, 47 years ago. The kitchen there has not been altered since 1956. The turquoise General Electric appliances and cabinetry are...
Once upon a Time: History as the Story of Real People Engages Children
Karen Goldberg Goff is a writer for The Washington Times. Christopher Copple's love of history is organized onto a three-panel display board where he has detailed the origins of the 50-star flag the nation salutes. "The flag is the face of our nation,"...
Orthodontia: Straight Talk on Teeth
Elizabeth Green is a writer with The Washington Times. Melanie Treanor's crooked teeth have bothered her all her life, but it was not until this year that she considered seeing an orthodontist. A cheerleader for the Washington Redskins, Treanor...
Reformers Take on Egypt's Old Guard
John Zarocostas is a writer with The Washington Times. Egypt's political and economic elites are in the midst of an intense policy tussle over the pace of change and the country's future. The July resignation of the government led by Atif Obeid,...
Regional Integration Starting with Defense
For most of Latin America, the days of dictatorships and civil wars are largely over, but security is still elusive. Historic border conflicts continue, democracy is fragile in many countries, and new internal and external threats have emerged. ...
Self-Serve Revolution: Touch Screens Speeding Things Up for Customers
Donna De Marco is a writer with The Washington Times. It's not so far-fetched anymore for consumers to spend an entire day running errands and entertaining themselves without ever talking to anyone. It takes just a touch of a computer screen...
Taiwan Dances on a Tightrope: Prospective New Constitution Irritates Beijing
I-wei J. Chang is a writer with The Washington Times. Taiwan's "new constitution" will be focused on improving democratic governance and protecting civil liberties, and won't touch the sensitive issues in cross-strait relations, a Taiwan government...
Taking Salvador Dali Seriously
Salvador Dali never met a stunt he didn't like. In "Dali: Mass Culture," the exhibition in Madrid marking the centenary of the Spanish artist's birth, he can be seen hamming it up in TV commercials for Braniff Airlines (now defunct), Alka Seltzer (still...
Tax Evasion Is a Way of Life in Brazil
Kenneth Rapoza is a writer for The Washington Times. It's a jungle out there, say Brazil's business owners. Stringent labor laws, high interest rates, and heavy taxes have led to rampant smuggling and tax evasion, some of it tied to international...
The Link between Sunspots and Earth's Warming
Studies at the Max Planck Institute for Solar System Research (MPS) reveal that solar activity affects the climate but plays only a minor role in the current global warming. Since the middle of the last century, the Sun has been in a phase of unusually...
The Menace of Melanoma
Jen Waters is a reporter for The Washington Times. Henry Lichtenstein of Forestville, Maryland, survived the wrath of Adolf Hitler. Now he is working on defeating skin cancer. During World War II, Lichtenstein, 82, who is Jewish by heritage,...
Tourism Picking Up in Kurdish Southeast
About 20 percent of Turkey's 68 million people are Kurds, and about 52 percent of all Kurds live in Turkey, most of them in the southeastern part of the country. The Kurds call their area Kurdistan, which they see as mainly including parts of Turkey,...
What Drives the Iraq Insurgency
A coordinated mortar barrage hit U.S. military camps in Ramadi at 1:05 p.m. one day recently. The attack killed one Marine gunnery sergeant and seriously wounded four others at Camp Blue Diamond, headquarters of the 1st Marine Division. "He's getting...
Why Conservatives Should Oppose the Anti-Immigration Movement
Andre Traversa is a freelance journalist and radio consultant living in the Chicago area. His passion is talk radio, and his goal is to return to the airwaves with his own show. Growing up as the child of first-generation immigrant parents and grandparents,...