The World and I

World and I is an encyclopedic journal that includes world news; developments in science, the arts and philosophy; book reviews; and photo essays. Since it was founded in 1986, it is printed monthly. The journal is published by Washington Times Corp.Subjects for World and I include science; literature and literary reviews; food and cooking; art; travel and tourism; politics; philosophy; music and musical instruments; drama and theatre. The editor is Steve Osmond.

Articles from Vol. 22, No. 9, September

Afghanistan at the Crossroads
"As the country now turns a new leaf, our ambition is to give hope to each and every Afghan"--Hamid Karzai, President of Afghanistan. The future of Afghanistan is uncertain as it confronts some of its most difficult challenges. The Taliban, bolstered...
Castle Duivenvoorde
Elegant Symbol of Holland's Golden Age Visiting the Netherlands in 1873, Irish historian W.E.H. Lecky compared the Dutch country houses with those in England: "The houses struck me as a more human institution, much better both for the owners and...
Christ the Redeemer
Christ the Redeemer and the January River Are there any new worlds left? Barring the deep sea and a rare find in some remote land-based location, it appears that humanity has explored nearly every cavity, crevice, and hiding spot that this world...
Introduction
History has shown us time and time again how notions of superiority, rooted in a lack of understanding, can easily morph into anger and dangerous intolerance. There has been much tension and negative regard to the world of Islam for this reason. In...
Introduction
Large international sports competitions, like the Olympics or Panamerican games, draw the attention of the world in multi-faceted ways. Interest, concern, pride, fear, and hope are feelings often associated with athletes or fans of these games. Yet...
Introduction
During the past two to three decades, Latin America has made substantial strides in the direction of representative democracy and civil society. Throughout much of the twentieth century, most of the nations in the region were ruled by authoritarian...
My Other September 11
BARCELONA CELEBRATES CATALUNYA'S NATIONAL HOLIDAY Unlike virtually everyone else in the country, I was not plugged into the television that Tuesday morning. Instead, I was writing poetry in my office. It was going well so I let my pencil carry me...
Palawan and the Afterlife
The actor Matthew Mendoza is sipping San Miguel Light and musing about the days when he was at the peak of stardom before his self-imposed retreat. I draw the conversation back to Palawan--Matthew's hideout, and the geographical, ecological, and infrastructural...
Second Anniversary to What?
Second Anniversary To What? The New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival Maybe it happened because I was sweating faster than I could drink water. Maybe I splashed too much hot sauce on my crawfish rice, and my jambalaya after that. Maybe being...
Spain's Growing Pains
It is a common scene to those living on the forsaken fringes of America's metropolises, where an air of physical threat emanates from every corner: Restless tattooed boys and bejeweled girls congregate in city parks and squares, pacing with nervous...
The Colosseum
On July 7th, the New Seven Wonders of the World were announced in Lisbon, Portugal. Chosen as a result of a global popularity poll, organized by the New Open World Corporation, more than 100 million votes were cast by Internet and phone. Among...
The Hagia Sophia
The Hagia Sophia: Evidence of Istanbuls Conflicted Past Istanbul is a city of crossroads. Its a place where East meets West; a spot where Christianity and Islam have come face-to-face for centuries; a city which still stands somewhere between modernity...
The Sea Gypsies of Surin Island
The Tsunami's Wake Impacts Thailand's Mogen People One of the smallest ethnic minorities in Asia, the Mogen people--commonly called Sea Gypsies--were virtually unknown to the outside world until the 2004 tsunami ravaged South East Asia. One of the...