The World and I

World and I is an encyclopedic journal that includes world news; developments in science, the arts and philosophy; book reviews; and photo essays. Since it was founded in 1986, it is printed monthly. The journal is published by Washington Times Corp.Subjects for World and I include science; literature and literary reviews; food and cooking; art; travel and tourism; politics; philosophy; music and musical instruments; drama and theatre. The editor is Steve Osmond.

Articles from Vol. 24, No. 10, October

Andrew Grove: He Hid from Hitler Then Changed the World
A Jewish Hungarian Childhood: Hiding from the Nazis Being Jewish in 1936 was dangerous. Adolf Hitler, the Nazi chancellor of Germany, wanted to kill all the Jewish people. Even people who were not religious Jews were to die. As Hitler's armies conquered...
A Tour of Poetry
Poetry is the most highly regarded and most ancient literary genre in China. It is interesting that among thousands of Chinese poems; more than one third of them portray sightseeing. These poems are full of wonder and imagination, in a combination...
Bilingualism, the Personality Shape-Shifter
Does being bilingual consciously change personality when switching languages? Researchers who conducted a study on this subject tell me this does happen. Researchers David Lewis from Baruch College, and Torsten Ringberg and Laura A. Perracchio from...
Guatemala's Old Ones
A glimpse into Mayan culture Tikal, the mightiest city of the Mayan empire still rises from the jungle like a phoenix refusing to die. For most people it is a magnificent ruin, probably the most popular in all of Guatemala, but it still holds power...
Introduction
As flu season descends, we wait with some trepidation for the heaviest onset of Swine Flu. Nothing demonstrates more effectively the effects of our globalized culture than this latest pandemic. The World Health Organization estimates that close to...
Melodrama: Low Comedy or High Art? Part One
What is melodrama? Most of us, when we think of it at all, and we often don't, think of a "melodramatic" scene such as in Augustin Daly's "Under the Gaslight" (1905). The character Snorkey is tied up and laid on the tracks. Just as the train comes...
Susan Reyna: Queen of Harvests
From the Migrant Cycle to a Successful Career and Activism Susan Reyna never dreamed she would receive "The Spirit of Excellence Award," sponsored by The Miami Herald, from then First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton ten years ago. Executive Director...
The Firestorm Unleashed Here: Recalling Harpers Ferry
Strolling the picturesque streets of Harpers Ferry, West Virginia, one easily forgets that American history took a dramatic turn here. Harpers Ferry is nestled in the Blue Ridge Mountains at the confluence of the Potomac and Shenandoah Rivers. It...
William Blake, Visionary Rebel
It happens with greater frequency then you might think. The name of an artist practically disappears from public consciousness, then returns many years later with renewed impact and a sure indication of the artist's staying power. Such was the case...