The World and I

World and I is an encyclopedic journal that includes world news; developments in science, the arts and philosophy; book reviews; and photo essays. Since it was founded in 1986, it is printed monthly. The journal is published by Washington Times Corp.Subjects for World and I include science; literature and literary reviews; food and cooking; art; travel and tourism; politics; philosophy; music and musical instruments; drama and theatre. The editor is Steve Osmond.

Articles from Vol. 21, No. 9, September

Anatomy of a Penguin: Testing the Resilience of an Antarctic Hero
On a deserted island at the end of the world, I met the natives. Nearly a quarter million King Penguins spread out in front of me, shrieking, bathing, standing each other up--but mostly just standing around. On distant South Georgia Island south...
Capturing Our Past
Great Britain's Prime Minister Winston Churchill once observed, "The farther backward you can look, the farther forward you are likely to see." (1) With this in mind, we should consider how important it is for each one of us to record the history and...
Dieciocho: Chile's Month-Long Independence 'Day'
When Chileans wake up on Independence Day (September 18), chances are many of them have already celebrated some parts of this holiday on previous days, or even as far back as the beginning of the month of September. Dieciocho (pronounced dee-ay-see-OH-cho)...
Introduction
August 29, 2006 marks the one-year anniversary of Hurricane Katrina, a natural disaster that ripped through the coasts of Louisiana, Alabama and Mississippi; killed over 1,600 people; displaced thousands more; and caused an estimated $81.2 billion...
Keep Disarray at Bay the Feng Shui Way
A daughter of Western tradition, I have always tended to dismiss anything that couldn't be measured, quantified or scientifically reasoned as mere superstitious nonsense. So, it should come as no surprise that I frequently found myself rolling my eyes...
Modern Hebrew's Dilemmas
Apart from the political difficulties in trying to establish a Jewish state, many linguists (concerned observers in addition to the perennial cynics and pessimists), doubted that Hebrew, a language that had been "frozen" and endured almost entirely...
Paul Klee: The Artist as Serious Comedian
There's a good chance that when you see the work of Paul Klee (1879-1940), the Swiss/German artist, you will smile. That's no accident. Klee wanted his viewers to be amused by his art; that's how he communicated his ideas. Klee is among the most...
The Bully Problem
The results are in: Violence, insults, and intimidation among kids do more psychological harm than anyone anticipated. But can schools do anything about it? A decade ago, Branford High School had a bullying problem. Harassment, violence, and graffiti...
The Democratizing Effect of Oral Argument
"Democratic" is not a word normally associated with the Supreme Court of the United States. An unelected tribunal granted lifelong terms that confers in secret sessions and is beyond the watchful eye of television cameras does not at first glance seem...
Therapy Dogs Lending a Helping Paw to Students
It isn't unusual for Ellen Knight, a school counselor at Basehor Elementary, to receive requests such as the note handed to her by a group of students during recess. Scrawled on the piece of paper: "We would like to know if we can read to Bailey?...
Tibet in Exile
As political activists go, Tenzin Tsundue is an unflappable man. He's calm and reflective, he doesn't force his agenda down your throat, and he's the kind of person you can tell has spent many a quiet moment in silence ... thinking, searching, exploring...
Tragedy, Truth, Triumph: Part I
This is the first of a three-part series focusing on the inner struggle and triumph of one teacher's recovery from a tragic accident. Written as a journal, this true story is an excerpt from her book Tragedy, Truth, Triumph: A Woman's Personal Battle...
Woven Glass? Markow & Norris Make It Possible
Self-taught glass artists Eric Markow and Thom Norris set out to do the seemingly impossible--to weave glass into a fabric from which they would create sculptural art objects. What followed was a four-year journey of trial and error and pioneering...