The World and I

World and I is an encyclopedic journal that includes world news; developments in science, the arts and philosophy; book reviews; and photo essays. Since it was founded in 1986, it is printed monthly. The journal is published by Washington Times Corp.Subjects for World and I include science; literature and literary reviews; food and cooking; art; travel and tourism; politics; philosophy; music and musical instruments; drama and theatre. The editor is Steve Osmond.

Articles from Vol. 21, No. 3, March

Beating the English Channel
It's easy to cross the English Channel these days. It's nothing to fly over it. You can still take a boat across to France. Or, you can go underneath via the Chunnel. But there are still some people around who want to do it the old-fashioned way--swim....
Confusion in the Evolution vs. Intelligent Design Controversy
There is a great deal of confusion in the current controversy about whether the view known as intelligent design, or ID, should be taught in biology classes along with the view known as evolution. Much of that confusion has to do with definitions and...
Damn Yankees Celebrates Two National Pastimes
One could reasonably argue that baseball is an art form. Like a theatrical production, the great American pastime is imbued with grace, intriguing players, challenges, ups and downs, and a storyline leading to a dramatic conclusion. Yet it is the sheer...
Giving Life to Dinosaurs in Utah
The Great Salt Lake is all that is left of the much greater Lake Bonneville, the ancient lake that covered some 20,000 square miles, and ran to a depth of 1,000 feet. The College of Eastern Utah Prehistoric Museum displays the fossils of sea creatures,...
Karl Landsteiner: Blood on His Mind
For more than forty years, Karl Landsteiner had blood on his mind. Not with evil or criminal intent, but with scientific curiosity. He studied blood, broke it down into its component parts, learned about it and how it worked in the human body. In doing...
Pablo Neruda: Poet from the End of the Earth
On September 24, 1973, a gray, grim day almost two weeks after a military coup had split his country apart, Pablo Neruda, 1971 Nobel Literature Prize Laureate, was buried in a borrowed grave in the General Cemetery in Santiago, Chile. His third wife,...
South Africa's Tribal Traditions Prevent New Freedoms
South Africa's freedom independence and one-man-one-vote rule have been the law of the land since 1994, when South African citizens adopted their new constitution. Unfortunately, this document has become a paper tiger, because the black majority government...
The Dalai Lama Converges Buddhist Thought and Modern Science
THE UNIVERSE IN A SINGLE ATOM: THE CONVERGENCE OF SCIENCE AND SPIRITUALITY By His Holiness the Dalai Lama Morgan Road Books (Doubleday Broadway Publishing), New York, 2005, 215 pp., $24.95 (Hardcover) Considering Francis Bacon' saying that...
The History and Current Issues of Immigration in America
For a great many people born in this great nation, citizenship is taken for granted. However, aliens seeking permanent residences have long appreciated the abundance of wealth and opportunity available to citizens residing in this country. By today's...