The World and I

World and I is an encyclopedic journal that includes world news; developments in science, the arts and philosophy; book reviews; and photo essays. Since it was founded in 1986, it is printed monthly. The journal is published by Washington Times Corp.Subjects for World and I include science; literature and literary reviews; food and cooking; art; travel and tourism; politics; philosophy; music and musical instruments; drama and theatre. The editor is Steve Osmond.

Articles from Vol. 21, No. 4, April

Frank Lloyd Wright's Japanese Legacy
A hundred years ago the ship "Empress of China" steamed across the Pacific from America to Japan. Among its passengers was an architectural genius, an art dealer known to overvalue his portfolio, a father of six, a repeatedly vilified adulterer, a...
India's Magical, Miniature Paintings
If you have never before seen the miniature drawings and paintings of India, your first experience may startle you. These small works of art are probably unlike any you have previously encountered. But don't turn away. There is a magical beauty to...
Introduction
It was only fifty-three years ago that three of the most horribly bloody years of the twentieth century ended. In the Korean War, which began in June 1950 and ended with a ceasefire in July 1953, the blood of some 2.5 million people was shed, soaking...
Korea's "New Right Movement": Good Potential, Challenging Future
The emergence of a "New Right" movement in South Korea reflects a search for balance by conservatives in a relatively progressive society. Conservatives are generally concerned about the social impacts of rapid modernization on beloved traditional...
Past Still Haunts Khmer Genocide Survivor
"I risked my life to get here, and I have done nothing with my time in America," says taxi driver, Matt Sindvith. "I have seen women who were raped, or people who survived the war in Bosnia or Sarajevo. They were able to put that behind them. But I...
Sir Julian Huxley Bridged Biology and Humanity
"If I am to be remembered, I hope it will not be primarily for my specialized scientific work, but as a generalist; one to whom, enlarging Terence's words, nothing human, and nothing in external nature, was alien."--Julian Huxley, "Memories" (1970)...
The Highs and Lows of Bipolar Disorder
When George Frederick Handel sat down to write "Messiah," he had never heard of bipolar disorder. Yet more than three centuries after cranking out his masterpiece in just six weeks, the stunning libretto would be offering inspiration to countless suffers...
The Power of Reading: Reading and Inspiration
This is the first of a four-part series on the joys and benefits of a simple but cherished pastime: reading. Let us begin with four facts. Reading can inspire, reading can provide good companionship, reading can fortify human freedoms, and reading...
The Problem of Forging Post-Soviet History
While the collapse of the USSR and the Soviet regime took place in 1991, and new generations of Russians are entering adult life without any personal experience of living under Soviet rule, the new Russian state is still in search of its identity....
The Six Party Talks: Going in Circles
In 2006, we are no closer to a peaceful diplomatic resolution of the nuclear issue on the Korean Peninsula. Nearly three years have passed since China gathered together in Beijing its diplomatic representatives with those from Moscow, Pyongyang, Seoul,...
Wallace Stevens' Blessed Rage for Order
Wallace Stevens, considered one of the world's best poets of the twentieth century, was different--in his appearance, in his take of the contemporary scene and in his approach to everyday life. Who would expect a great poet to look like he did--tall,...