The World and I

World and I is an encyclopedic journal that includes world news; developments in science, the arts and philosophy; book reviews; and photo essays. Since it was founded in 1986, it is printed monthly. The journal is published by Washington Times Corp.Subjects for World and I include science; literature and literary reviews; food and cooking; art; travel and tourism; politics; philosophy; music and musical instruments; drama and theatre. The editor is Steve Osmond.

Articles from Vol. 15, No. 9, September

A Masterpiece of Cheese - Prized by Cheese Lovers as One of the World's Greatest, Parmigiano-Reggiano Is Also One of the Most Versatile in the Kitchen
The stars of Parma's many charms also rank at the top of the Italian cuisine: Parmigiano-Reggiano, the genuine Parmesan cheese, and prosciutto di Parma, the Parma ham that even pleases the French, who call it "jambon de Parme." This ham and this cheese...
Ancient Science and Early Christianity
While some church fathers feared science might undermine religious belief, many found it useful for scriptural interpretation, and yet others saw it as a means to learn more about the Creator. "Extinguished theologians lie about the cradle of every...
Artists of the Land - the Farmers of France's Lubron Region
Some twenty kilometers southeast of Avignon in Provence, southern France, the mountain ridge of the Large and Small Luberon rises from the plain. The landscape surrounding these mountains has been beautifully fashioned by generations of agricultural...
A Short Pine Fills a Tall Order
The slow-growing, long-lived Colorado pi-on is a valuable gem in the American Soutwest. Long, long ago, in a land settled by the Washo people, pi-on trees were tall and mighty. But a great fire destroyed the woodlands, and the Washo began to starve....
A System in Crisis - It Is Unrealistic to Expect a System Constructed in Nineteenth-Century America to Provice What a Twenty-First-Century America Needs
Job Description: Executive leadership position available. Major organization located in a medium-sized town. Single-largest employer in town, with largest payroll and largest budget. Professional employees all possess at least a college degree. All...
A Vanished Port - on a Wild, Rocky Stretch of England's North Devon Coast, Two Friends Discover the Ghostly Remnants of Hartland Quay, Including an Eccentric Small Hotel and Pub Clinging to a Ledge above the Pounding Atlantic
Hartland Quay doesn't fit any of the quintessential rural England stereotypes of rolling green hills, grazing sheep, quaint fishing villages, and thatched stone cottages. Instead, monumental ocean waves crash against towers of black rock and roil furiously...
Globalization: The Good, the Bad, and the Unknown
This month the Currents in Modern Thought section begins a six-part series on globalization. Is globalization a rising tide that is lifting all boats, or a monstrous tidal wave deluging peoples and nations? The global economy is enormous--over $40...
Grandparents' Rights
In America's ever-changing society, what rights, if any, do grandparents have to see their grandchildren? Every state in the union is attempting to address this question, as reflected by the fact that all 50 have statutes that provide for grandparent...
Homecoming - Retracing My Welsh Roots
Dave was showing me the sitting room, first the blue parakeet and then the statues around the fireplace. "Just look at him, girl," he said, picking up a heavy china lion and placing it in my hand. "Feel's expensive, right?" He studied my reaction and...
In Tune with the Past - Bergen's International Festival
For almost a thousand years, lively Bergen, on Norway's western coast, has been a gateway to innovative cultures. Today the tradition continues through a colorful festival that brings together some of the world's best performers. Each May, as the...
Jean-Daniel Bouvard - the Art of Silence
"I am not interested in painting a particular place or people, but rather an ambience, restful and peaceful," says French artist Jean- Daniel Bouvard. "This is what I want my viewers to feel." Born in 1957 in the city of Saint-tienne, in 1976 Bouvard...
Mapping Our World
The log scale is a wonderful tool for helping us keep our bearings when relating to the vast realms of microspace and macrospace revealed by science. Science has kicked out the bottom and blown off the top of the narrowly circumscribed perceptual...
Mapping Our World - the Universe in Perspective
Can we, by applying the rules for making a map of the earth's surface, put a baseball and Mount Everest on the same map? No. If we draw Mount Everest, the baseball will be too small to see. If we draw the baseball, Mount Everest will be too big to...
Mapping Our World - What Is a Map?
With what expectations do we view a map? When does a map become art? Or when does art become a map? Above: Perhaps the most common expectation of a map is that it will show us what some geographical territory looks like in a way that could be useful...
Mudscrapers in the Sky - A Historical Sketch of Yemen
To understand present-day Yemen, it is essential to reach back to its past. Semitic people lived on the Arabian Peninsula for three thousand years before the conquest of Islam in a.d. 628. The last ruling power before Islam was the Sabaean Empire....
Mudscrapers in the Sky - an Ancient Land Renowned for Its Unique Desert-Dictated Architecture, Yemen Tenaciously Holds on to Its Cultural Past While Slowly Opening Its Doors to Tourism
I am sitting in the lead car of our four-wheeler convoy with Ali, the senior driver; Ahmed, our eloquent local guide; and our trip leader, Sarah Timewell. The two men are having an animated conversation, more like a shouting match, reaching a crescendo,...
Of Academic Fraud and the Education Crisis - Confessions and Revelations from an Ivy League Whore
Montreal-born Iain Steinberg now resides in California where he is working on his memoirs and pursuing his dream of scriptwriting. He is now officially out of the student-for-hire business. There are no chartreuse silk suits hanging in my closet,...
Opera Loses Its Voice
Does anyone know how to write an opera these days? The turning of the millennium brought forth a flood of music commissions, and during the 1999--2000 season an unprecedented number of new operas premiered across America. This is good news for an...
Public Education and Public Choice
Public education in America does not lack for intelligent and hardworking principals, teachers, students, and parents, and yet the system continues to produce disturbing results. More than one-third of our fourth-graders read below the basic level...
School Choice: A Report Card
The opposition to school choice is losing in the court of public opinion and having to loosen its bureaucratic stranglehold over the nation's schools and students. Few issues generate as heated a reaction as school choice. Many politicians recognize...
Serious Man's Comic
Comedian, actor, jazz pianist, and songwriter extraordinaire Steve Allen has been a light in the entertainment firmament for over 50 years, yet he would dearly like to see the hand of censorship discriminately at work in that field of stars. "The...
Shaving the Truth - A Profile of William Dean Howells
Linda Simon is associate professor of English at Skidmore College. Before beginning his career as a novelist, William Dean Howells as editor of the Atlantic Monthly rejected a poem submitted to the magazine. "What I want you to do for us--and yourself,...
Temples for the Gods - Britain's New Theater Architecture
Britain has spent several billion dollars on building new theaters and restoring old ones. Is it in imitation of the "grand projects" of France, or have the political leaders simply gone mad? A provocative social history could be written about the...
The Blessings and Challenges of Globalization
Daniel T. Griswold is associate director of the Center for Trade Policy Studies at the Cato Institute in Washington, D.C. The evidence of globalization can be seen everywhere: in the home, in the workplace, in the discount stores, in the newspapers...
The Fox in a Suit - Luxembourg's Crafty Character Renert
The little gold pin, the caricature of a jaunty fox in a man's suit, was pressed into my hand. "This is Renert, our national folk symbol," said my host, Anne. But when I asked about stories connected to the character, she changed the subject. "Oh,...
The Fox in a Suit - the Poet Michel Rodange
Michel Rodange was a cantonnier, a minor state official or officer of public works (the duchy is divided into twelve cantons, or districts). Writing was his hobby, and he was a published minor poet (in newspapers) when he came to live in Wiltz. Renert...
The Modern World - Zadie Smith, Modest First Novelist
Zadie Smith is 24 years old. She grew up in Willesden, in north London, the daughter of a Jamaican mother and a considerably older English father, who are now divorced. She confounded expectations at her secondary school by attending King's College,...
The Modern World - Zadie Smith's Debut Novel Chronicles Contemporary Multicultural London and Brings George Eliot to Mind
Merritt Moseley teaches literature at the University of North Carolina at Asheville. He is the author of books on David Lodge, Kingsley Amis, and Julian Barnes; a frequent commentator on the Booker Prize for the Sewanee Review and other journals; and...
The Presidential Election in Mexico
Mexico's message UNITED STATES--The decision by the Mexican electorate to throw out the longest lived one-party state can justly be called historic. It does not mean the end of the road for one-party states so long as communist rule survives in...
The PRI Out-Foxed
When Francisco Madero raised the banner of protest against President Porfirio D'az in 1910, he began a process that became known as the Mexican Revolution. On July 2, Mexico's electorate declared a second Mexican Revolution, which many hope will be...
The Third-Party Impact
"At no time in history has voter allegiance to traditional political parties been at such a low," Pat Buchanan said in an interview with The World & I in April, shortly after the onetime Nixon and Reagan White House staffer had announced his withdrawal...
The Year of Asia at Cannes
Asian films were everywhere in evidence at this year's Cannes International Film Festival and made off with four of the eight major prizes. "I'm in the mood to shout!" exclaimed Tony Leung upon accepting his best actor award for In the Mood for...
Trust the Government
Vice President Al Gore wants to devote all of Social Security's surpluses to Social Security and debt reduction--with the money saved from the interest payments on the national debt used to shore up the Social Security Trust Fund, which is the government's...
Trust the People
Texas Gov. George W. Bush's plan centers primarily around supporting private savings accounts, based on the principle that workers should have the right to invest part of their payroll taxes in private savings accounts. He stresses that the payroll...
Was Ben-Gurion Right? Does Television Undermine Israeli Culture?
Shalom Fingarhut, a religious educator, fears the influence of television but sees no possibility of keeping it out of his living room. So he tries to ensure that his children use discretion when they decide what to watch. "I think I've been pretty...
Water Resource Conflicts in the Middle East
Christine Drake is professor of geography in the Department of Political Science and Geography, Old Dominion University, Norfolk, Virginia. This is an edited version of an article previously published in the Journal of Geography 96:1 (Jan.--Feb. 1997)....
When Sex 'Needs' to Be Fixed
Nonstandard embryonic developments can lead to individuals whose genes and anatomy do not line up to specify either male or female and who face profound challenges in developing a clear sense of sexual selfhood. "When puberty made me a monster ...
Where Gore and Bush Stand on Education - the Two Presidential Candidates Differ Significantly on Government's Role in Our Schools
As George W. Bush and Al Gore prepare for the final months of the 2000 presidential election cycle, both are working hard to highlight their education plans. Polls show education to be one of the public's top concerns, and Governor Bush is focusing...
Within the Rules - the Hindu Women of Bhaktapur, Nepal
Eyes sparkling, tawny skin glowing against her salmon pink kameez, Chandika reveals the secret of her marriage. "You know," she says, indicating her 22-carat, jewel-encrusted pendant--a wedding gift from her husband--and an equally splendid gold wedding...