The World and I

World and I is an encyclopedic journal that includes world news; developments in science, the arts and philosophy; book reviews; and photo essays. Since it was founded in 1986, it is printed monthly. The journal is published by Washington Times Corp.Subjects for World and I include science; literature and literary reviews; food and cooking; art; travel and tourism; politics; philosophy; music and musical instruments; drama and theatre. The editor is Steve Osmond.

Articles from Vol. 17, No. 5, May

America's Vital Role - the United States, as the World's Most Powerful Democracy, Should Help India and Pakistan Achieve Their Legitimate Aspirations
September 11, 2001, represents a watershed in the history of our nation. The sole surviving superpower was awakened from its self- imposed stupor and false sense of security. The attack on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon changed the political...
Another African Tragedy
Robert Mugabe was hailed as a hero and swept into office as Zimbabwe's first president in 1980. He vowed to make Zimbabwe a one-party nation and his African National Union-Patriotic Front a truly Marxist-Leninist party to ensure the charting of...
Berlinale Blues
Although this year's Berlin International Film Festival was rather lackluster, it showed European filmmakers reexamining World War II, Chinese cinema departing from Fifth Generation aesthetics, and spectacular Japanese animation finally gaining...
Campaign Finance 'Reform'
Congress has recently passed extensive new restrictions on campaign finance. The proponents of these new limits--Reps. Christopher Shays (R-Connecticut) and Martin Meehan (D-Massachusetts), along with Sens. John McCain (R-Arizona) and Russell Feingold...
Forever Young - the NBC at Fifty
:espite fewer performances and less funding, the National Ballet of Canada has remained an energetic and talented company, led by a gifted artistic director liberated from old methodologies. For ordinary mortals, turning fifty can be disquieting....
Fossil Fuels and Energy Independence
To become self-sufficient in energy resources, the United States needs to combine the conservation strategies learned over the past 30 years with the latest fuel-saving technologies. Following the outbreak of the Arab-Israeli war in 1973, petroleum-...
How to Mourn a Tragedy and Make Money
Lawrence Rudden is director of research for the Graham Williams Group, a public relations firm in Washington, D.C. His article on airline passenger rage appeared in the July 2001 issue of The World & I. It's now about eight months since four...
In Moscow, the Play's the Thing
Two productions demonstrate vying extremes in theater: an understated but devastatingly truthful portrayal that resonates higher meanings, and an "in-yer-face" paean to chaos. The much missed British music-hall comic of my childhood, Sid Field,...
In Search of Lost Japan - over One Hundred Years Ago, a Young Irish American Named Lafcadio Hearn Journeyed to Japan to Start a New Life and Became One of Its Literary Sons
His story sounds oddly familiar. An alienated young man, a failure in his own country, resolves to make a fresh start overseas. He travels to Japan and gets a job teaching English. There, he falls in love with a beautiful Japanese woman. He settles...
Inventing the 21st-Century Soldier
By supporting the dismounted soldier with a wide range of advanced technologies, the U.S. Army aims to achieve a twentyfold increase in his ability to see first, understand first, decide and act first, finish decisively, and survive and endure....
Inventing the 21st-Century Soldier - Battle Suit 2010
The following fictional letter, written in 2010 from the soldier Bob to his parents, presents one vision of what tomorrow's technology-enhanced Army may look like. October 30, 2010 Dear Mom and Dad, Yesterday I finished my last technical...
Journalists in the Making
Last January, the New York Observer called on Tom Goldstein, one of the nation's leading journalism school deans, to resign from an ethically ambiguous job he had been given. Goldstein, dean of Columbia's Graduate School of Journalism, had been...
Kashmir: A 50-Year Controversy - Hindu and Muslim Hatreds May Run Too Deep to Be Resolved by Governments in Either New Delhi or Islamabad
The December crisis between India and Pakistan, precipitated by the terrorist attack on the Indian Parliament (see sidebar, p. ???), was not sparked by simple terrorism but by the half-century fight over Kashmir that remains a festering sore in...
Kashmir: A 50-Year Controversy - Threat of War
The morning of December 13, 2001, was sultry. Five young soldiers looked cramped in the small, Indian-built Ambassador sedan as it approached the main gate of New Delhi's Parliament House complex. The guard eyed the white car's approach with some...
Lawrence Criner - A Passionate Eye
Lawrence Criner started out as a journalist. His working day was spent relating to the world through the written word. Then life threw him a hardball: he was struck with Parkinson's disease. "It has forced me to make many life changes, not the least...
Linkletter: Man of Many Riches
Art Linkletter started life in circumstances about as forlorn and hopeless as one can imagine. He was abandoned by his biological parents in the backwater Canadian plains town of Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan, and raised in an orphanage until he was adopted...
Mexico's New-And Reef-Ridden-Waters
The July 2000 elections undoubtedly marked the dawn of a new era in Mexico. The Mexican people enthusiastically brought about a peaceful and stable change in their long-standing regime by casting their votes for Vicente Fox, the presidential candidate...
Mexico's New-And Reef-Ridden-Waters - Treasure from Tourism
In Mexico, a synonym for gringos could well be dinero (money). Mexico attracts some 20 million tourists a year, most of them from its big northern neighbor, the United States of America. The visitors' $8 billion a year in spending supports approximately...
No Free Lunch - Small Steps to Development in Bangladesh
Henry Kissinger once described Bangladesh as a "basket case": a country so hopelessly poor, crowded, and disorganized that it could never feed and educate its people. Ten years ago, a Bangladeshi journalist in Dhaka, the nation's capital, told me...
Nuclear Power's New Promise and Peril
At the cusp of two centuries, humanity faces a crossroads in energy development. At the same time as the fossil fuel use of the twentieth century has increased pollutants in the earth's atmosphere, it has led to U.S. dependence on oil controlled...
Nuclear Power's New Promise and Peril - What If a Jumbo Jet Hit?
The chances of terrorists successfully piloting a fully fueled commercial airliner into a U.S. nuclear power plant and causing a catastrophic release of radioactivity are virtually nil, according to engineers and government authorities. "We have...
'Peer Grading' Passes School Privacy Test
In a case that started as one mother's mission to save her child from embarrassment at school, a unanimous Supreme Court has upheld the widespread teaching practice of peer-graded exams utilized by thousands of teachers and schools around the nation....
Pewter with Panache - Malaysia's Royal Selangor
In 1885, a Chinese youth landed in Malaya with just a dream. Today, Royal Selangor, the company he founded in Kuala Lumpur, is the largest producer of fine pewter in the world. A penniless lad of thirteen, all skin and bones, was one of many ...
Proteins, Proteins Everywhere
The massive undertaking to study the entire set of human proteins will clarify the molecular basis of many diseases, leading to more reliable diagnostics and more effective treatments. Since the early 1990s, the Human Genome Project has been devoted...
Proteins, Proteins Everywhere - MDS Proteomics
Among the new generation of proteomics companies, MDS Proteomics is one of the first to adopt a high-throughput, industrialized process that includes the use of mass spectrometers--sophisticated instruments that can be used to identify proteins...
Queen Victoria and Mrs. Brown
Michael Timko is professor emeritus of the City University of New York. His article "Why Dickens Wrote A Christmas Carol" appeared in the December 2001 issue of The World & I. While we ought to be grateful to the recent movie Mrs. Brown for...
Satisfy My Soul - Black Life and Nature in the Rural South of the Twenties Comes Alive in Zora Neale Hurston's Latest Resurrection from the Archive
John Lowe is professor of English at Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge. Author of Jump at the Sun: Zora Neale Hurston's Cosmic Comedy (1994), he has published many articles and essays on African-American, southern, Native American, and ethnic...
Such Peculiar Names - Interest in Names
My interest in the meaning of Zambian traditional names started in the 1950s, when I was very young. As a six-year-old I lived with my maternal grandfather in Chipewa (also known as Chupu) village. My grandfather was a tall, strong man. He woke...
Such Peculiar Names - the Significance of Naming in Zambia
What if you heard about or actually knew someone whose real first name was Because, Clever, Shame, Financial, or Trouble? You would probably conclude that these are nicknames, imposed somehow on unwilling individuals. Or perhaps the names were chosen...
Taking the High Ground - the U.S. Military Marches into Space
Alan Dowd is a freelance writer based in Indianapolis. His last article for The World & I appeared in January 2002. NEWS ITEM--Calling it "the military equivalent of a Pearl Harbor in space and the psychological equivalent of another September...
The Alcott of Aquarius - Articulating a Practical Christianity, Louisa May Alcott Examined the Struggles and Triumphs of Young Girls and Revolutionized the Writing of Children's Books
Laurie Morrow, a former English professor, is the cohost, with Kelsey Bush-Nadeau, of the talk radio show True North, broadcast weekdays on 1390 AM, WKDR (Burlington, Vermont). The president of Evening Star Grants & Development, Morrow lives...
The Antioxidant Herbs - Used for Millennia to Add Flavor to Our Foods, Culinary Herbs Are Also Natural and Abundant Sources of Healing Chemicals
They're robust, tangy, and pungent. They're perfect for soups and stews, accents on pizza and in cheese dips and even desserts. And now we learn they are good for us, too. What a bonus! U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) scientists recently carried...
The Call of the Wild - A Travel Writer Tries to Explain What It Takes to Survive and Thrive in Alaska
Mark Barna is a writer living in California. His most recent article for The World & I was "The Stargazer," in the March 2002 issue. Book Info:LOOKING FOR ALASKA Peter Jenkins Publisher:New York: St. Martin's Press, 2001 434 pp., $25.95...
The Kashmir Imbroglio
The Special Report in Current Issues this month deals with the contentious relationship between India and Pakistan. The central focus of the issues between them is Kashmir. And Kashmir is merely one example of a much broader international problem:...
The Zimbabwe Election
Placing obstacles in voters' way ZIMBABWE--The failure by both the Registrar-Generals Office and the Electoral Supervisory Commission to advise voters properly on their respective wards and polling stations, is one of many attempts to confuse...
To the Nursing Home
Jeffrey Meyers, a fellow of the Royal Society of Literature, will publish Inherited Risk: Errol and Sean Flynn in Hollywood and Vietnam in 2002. Quite suddenly, I began getting phone calls in California from strangers in New York, warning that...
Why the India-Pakistan Crisis Matters
There has often been serious tension between India and Pakistan over the last 50 years, but concern about a shooting war between the two Southeast Asian neighbors has now heightened. The immediate reason is last December's suicide attack on the...