The World and I

World and I is an encyclopedic journal that includes world news; developments in science, the arts and philosophy; book reviews; and photo essays. Since it was founded in 1986, it is printed monthly. The journal is published by Washington Times Corp.Subjects for World and I include science; literature and literary reviews; food and cooking; art; travel and tourism; politics; philosophy; music and musical instruments; drama and theatre. The editor is Steve Osmond.

Articles from Vol. 17, No. 3, March

America and Afghanistan: A Troubled History : With the Soviet Withdrawal from Afghanistan in 1989, American Interest Quicklly Lapsed, Even Though the Afghan Conflict Had Helped to End the Cold War
Although Afghanistan won its independence from British control in 1919, it was not until a quarter century later that the Afghan and U.S. administrations, just about as geographically remote from each other as was possible, considered there was...
America's Environmental Rebirth
Ask a cross section of informed citizens to identify the single largest public-policy success story in America in recent decades, and most will probably answer crime and welfare. The national crime rate has fallen more than 30 percent over the...
America's Environmental Rebirth : North America's Expanding Forests
From a suburbanite's-eye view, American forests are fast disappearing, as families migrate from center cities and new housing subdivisions and roads force the felling of innumerable stands of stately trees. But what the suburbanite doesn't see...
A New Kind of War
While most U.S. publications are focusing on the here and now of the war against terrorism, The World & I offers this Special Report, which looks into the causes and challenges of the conflict, beginning with a brief history of the often troubled...
Art in the Wilderness : Capturing Algonquin's Beauty
Bilding upon the tradition of the Group of Seven, Canada's gifted 1920s nature painters, adventuresome artists are once again capturing the magnificence of Algonquin Park's unspoiled landscape and splendid wildlife. In today's climate of stress...
A Tale of Two Libraries
Despite early critics' attacks, public libraries in Vancouver and San Antonio are part of a growing North American trend toward innovative, user-friendly urban architecture. When Vancouver's new public library opened on May 26, 1995, the Colosseumlike...
Building Iraq's Bomb
Khidhir Hamza says one of his greatest accomplishments in life is not getting killed by Iraqi President Saddam Hussein during a period of 24 years while working on the dictator's nuclear weapons project--the last 7 of them as the program's director....
Communicating with the Muslim World : What Can the United States Do to Counter the Anti-Americanism Prevalent in Many Islamic Countries?
In the October 28, 2001, Washington Post, Richard Holbrooke, former U.S. representative to the United Nations, argued: "If we fail to convince Muslims that this is not a war against Islam but a war against terrorism, if bin Laden succeeds in defining...
Education Changes : What's Best for Kids in School
Robert Rubinstein is the author of the nationally acclaimed Hints for Teaching Success, based on his thirty-two years of teaching experience, as well as three other books. He has made four recordings as a professional storyteller and has published...
Eternity in the Rocks
Through reflection, we can better grasp the vast expanses of time embodied in swirling stars, colliding continents, sliding plates, and inexorably weathering landmasses. The stars fascinate my six-year-old son. Last summer while on vacation,...
From This Month's Menu
March is Women's History month. In this issue there is plenty about women in history and about the impact remarkable women are making in the world today in a wide variety of fields. She of Myth and Memory in the Culture section compares the legend...
Gaining Power by Thinking Small
Using newly developed technologies, we can meet our rising energy demands by instituting a system of localized power generation that is more economical, more efficient, less polluting, and less susceptible to blackouts. When you switch on a light,...
Girls Kick : A British Beginning
Long before Mia Hamm and Julie Foudy put women's soccer on the map, the first female stars could be seen in Britain. While the Women's United Soccer Association may be the first women's professional league in the world, female soccer flourished...
Girls Kick : Women's Soccer Earns a Unique Place in Sport
In 1991 the U.S. women's soccer team won the FIFA (Federation of International Football Associations) Women's World Championship, defeating Norway 2--1 before sixty thousand fans in Canton, China. The victory hardly made a ripple in the American...
Give Prisoners the Opportunity to Work
Strom Thurmond, Republican from South Carolina, is president pro tempore of the U.S. Senate and a member of the Senate Judiciary Committee. In order to improve the corrections system of the United States, all inmates who are physically able must...
Intellectual Freedom and Social Responsibility : As We Grow More Dependent on the Internet, We Grow More Vulnerable
Any new technology brings opportunities and challenges. The taming of fire, the invention of the printing press, and the discovery of DNA were all major technological events that stretched our thinking. They forced us to reexamine how society should...
Intellectual Freedom and Social Responsibility: Internet Terms and Important Web Sites
Encryption: the process for rendering messages unreadable by anyone but their intended recipient. Internet-based techniques rely on keys, special large numbers used for encoding and decoding messages. The most common software for encryption uses...
Kaplan on Strauss
To the Editor: I read Morton Kaplan's editorial on Leo Strauss ["Saul Bellow, Allan Bloom, and Leo Strauss," August 2000, p. 11; available from our online archives at www.worldandi.com]. I am generally sympathetic to Strauss and am accustomed...
Keep a Cool Heart : Ultimate Frisbee in Bangkok
The Frisbee flies down the long patch of Bangkok grass. Two players sprint under the disk, gasping in the high heat and humidity. As the Frisbee descends into the end zone, the two men both dive to catch it. But the player on offense extends his...
Locked in a Deadly Embrace
As if the war on terrorism were not enough, India and Pakistan began to mobilize close to one million troops along their border in December 2001, forcing Secretary of State Colin Powell to rush to the region in mid- January to try to prevent a war....
Media Violence: Ugly and Getting Uglier
Murder rates doubled 10 to 15 years after the introduction of television in the United States, Canada, and virtually every country where "free" television was launched--truly a troubling anecdote. In the last 10 years, violent female role models...
Media Violence: Ugly and Getting Uglier: Is Crime the Punishment?
Young minds have been exposed to a relentless hail of violent films and TV programs over the past 10, 20, 30 years and more, so one might expect there to have been a measurable increase in violent crime over the same period. And indeed there...
Mekong Harvests : Balancing Shrimp and Rice Farming in Vietnam
Some twelve hundred miles from its start on the Chinese border, Vietnam's fabled National Route 1 cuts flat and straight across the Mekong Delta province of Bac Lieu. Lining the two-lane highway are houses and shops, many of them perched on stilts...
Muslims in America : Muslims Live in Every Part of the United States, Adding Greatly to the American Mosaic
Islam is the fastest growing religion in the world, especially in the United States. From Indonesia to Morocco, there are 56 countries where Muslims are a majority and several dozen more where they are a sizable minority. Every fourth person...
Orazio and Artemisia : Father and Daughter Artists of the Baroque
Artemisia Gentileschi has become the darling of feminist art historians, but her work is often seen only as a reflection of her dramatic life. Her father, meanwhile, has languished in obscurity. Now the first major exhibition on either artist achieves...
Power over Medical Decisions
If ever there was a case that illustrates the mess of the health-care system in this country, it is Rush Prudential HMO v. Moran, now pending before the U.S. Supreme Court. Not that the Court can straighten out the nation's health-care plight by...
Queens of Speed : Little Recognized for Years, Three Talented Women Have Fueled the Success of America's Most Recognizable Auto Racing Organizations
My eyes watered and my nostrils burned as the hot gust of wind blew me backward two steps. The thunderous roar that came with it lifted my feet a full inch off the ground, and for a second, my vision blurred. The warm burst of exhaust, full of fumes...
Ravi Shankar, Godfather of World Music
Now nearly eighty-two, Ravi Shankar has not only brought classical Indian music to a world audience but has done much to bridge diverse cultures-- and will continue to do so with his New Delhi arts center. Meanwhile, daughter Anoushka, at twenty,...
Rethinking Prison Control : New Incentives to Demand Improvement
Thomas O'Brien, former research director of Horizon Institute for Policy Solutions, is a writer in Charlottesville, Virginia. The corrections system in America is a staggering failure. Drugs are widely available in our prisons. Far too often the...
Safe Play in Harlem : Barbara Barlow, Harlem Hospital's First Full-Time Pediatric Surgeon, Saves Children before They Need Surgery
From the windows of Barbara Barlow's eleventh-floor office at Harlem Hospital, a playground is visible on a neighboring rooftop seven stories below. The yellow swings and slides glimmer in the morning sunlight. The playground is the first of thirty-two...
Self-Exile from Wretchedness : South African Novelist Peter Abrahams Left His Homeland amid the Horrors of Apartheid and Resettled in Jamaica
Charles R. Larson, professor of literature at American University, has recently published The Ordeal of the African Writer (Zed Books). Forty years ago, when I taught in West Africa, I came across a curious little book called Mine Boy, by South...
Self-Exile from Wretchedness : 'The African (and the Jamaican) in Me'
Charles Larson recently interviewed Peter Abrahams. Charles Larson: With all your continued frustrations in Jamaica, you stuck it out and remained. Why? Any regrets? Peter Abrahams: I remained in Jamaica because my wife and I had over the years...
Separate and Unequal, Still
Lawrence Rudden is a freelance writer living in Washington, D.C. His articles have appeared in The World & I, Washington, D.C.'s City Paper, the Washington Afro-American, News Dimensions, and Insight. "All who have meditated on the art of...
She of Myth and Memory : The Remarkable Legend of Sacagawea
Of those who participated in the fabled Lewis and Clark Expedition of 1804--06--which opened a path to the American West for a young nation propelled by faith in its own manifest destiny--only one, so far as we know, was a woman. Her name was Sacagawea....
The Biologist Meets the Computer Scientist
The developing field of bioinformatics provides researchers with computational tools to assemble and analyze DNA sequences, assess RNA production, determine protein structures, and design medications. For over a decade, researchers in laboratories...
The Biologist Meets the Computer Scientist: How Are Genes Expressed?
On the molecular level, genes are DNA sequences that encode instructions for the synthesis of RNA and protein. Each gene acts as a template from which specific RNA molecules are synthesized. Certain RNA molecules (of the class known as messenger...
The India-Pakistan Crisis
Mixed signals PAKISTAN--Mixed signals are emanating from New Delhi and Washington on the current confrontation between Pakistan and India. While New Delhi continues to exert immense military and political pressure on Pakistan, the U.S. seems...
The Lessons of Afghanistan
Many in the media and academia are calling for answers to American mistakes that led to the mess in the Arab world that resulted in the attack on the twin towers, one of the subjects of the Special Report in Current Issues this month. Perhaps the...
The Stargazer
Mark Barna is a writer living in California. His most recent article for The World & I was "Our Romance With Nature" in the May 2001 issue. A few years ago I was strolling down a sidewalk on Shattuck Avenue in Berkeley, California. Approaching...
The Trouble with Terror Insurance
Although September 11 supposedly changed everything, the fashioning of legislation still resembles sausage making. The debate on federal terror- insurance legislation late last year illustrated how political posturing and special-interest influence...
To See with Inner Sight : Celtic Mysteries Resist Reality in Brittany
There is an old saying: "The map is not the territory." We realized this was certainly true when we visited Brittany's forest of BrocAliande. Most maps refer to this small region--only twenty-seven square miles in area-- of primeval forest in the...
Vikings' Meadow : The Vikings Left Their Mark on Ireland's County Wicklow, and Today Its Beautiful Gardens and Greenery Conquer All Who Visit
Emerald waters purling golden strands, heathered mountains, verdant valleys laced with silver streams--Ireland's legendary landscape lured the invidious Vikings ashore. Eventually these pirates abandoned their plundering ways and their rugged Nordic...
William Morris
Mythic Master Since he began his renowned glasswork career in 1979, William Morris has increasingly delved into mythological expressions of man's behavior and role in contemporary society. Of special interest to the artist has been our connectedness...