The World and I

World and I is an encyclopedic journal that includes world news; developments in science, the arts and philosophy; book reviews; and photo essays. Since it was founded in 1986, it is printed monthly. The journal is published by Washington Times Corp.Subjects for World and I include science; literature and literary reviews; food and cooking; art; travel and tourism; politics; philosophy; music and musical instruments; drama and theatre. The editor is Steve Osmond.

Articles from Vol. 17, No. 11, November

9/11 Remembered
America enduring UNITED STATES--By now we've all mapped our whereabouts in the city of memory--where we stood, what we saw, who we knew or lost, how close we came, how far away we felt. We've learned to calibrate our anxiety. (The federal government...
A Marine Wonder of the World
While hosting our planet's most spectacular tidal flows, the Bay of Fundy nurtures an astonishing diversity of creatures, from the whales, seals, and flounder that move with the tides to the anemones, nudibranchs, and lumpfish that remain at the...
A Marine Wonder of the World - Lumpfish
In a world of strangely shaped fish, lumpfish (Cyclopterus lumpus) are among the most bizarre. Their stout bodies are scaleless and covered with rows of little lumps and bumps, topped by a dorsal fin that looks like a series of spines emerging from...
A Somber Remembrance
A day of worldwide remembrance drew to a close [September 11] the way it began--quietly--as President George W. Bush met families of victims of the September 11 attacks on the ground where nearly 3,000 people perished. The president, accompanied...
Capturing the Dance
Inthe ongoing struggle to preserve the choreography and interpretive nuances of ballets past and present, significant inroads have been made. Dance exists at a perpetual vanishing point." So observed critic Marcia Siegel in her 1973 collection...
Chemical Generation - Drug Abuse in the People's Republic of China
Riding in a dilapidated truck through China's Yunnan Province, a region known for its high percentage of ethnic minorities and widespread poverty, an elderly man turned to his neighbor, a foreign visitor, and compared his hometown to prosperous,...
City of Transition - Medieval Bruges and the Emergence of Modern Europe
On the morning of March 2, 1127, Charles the Good, count of Flanders, was at prayer in the Church of Saint Donatian in the city of Bruges. "Following his pious custom," wrote a witness, "he was giving out alms to the poor, with his eyes fixed on...
Cool Jazz - Norway's Molde International Jazz Festival
Dixieland meets bop meets postmodern sound effects in Norway's oldest jazz festival. Jazz has been described by some as the preeminent indigenous American art form. In fact, it draws upon many musical idioms encountered in the American melting...
Ecotourism for Dollars Only - Hiking in Cuba's Nature Preserves or Touring Spanish Colonial Cities, Visitors Are Constantly Aware of the Average Citizen's Daily Struggle to Make Ends Meet in a Dual-Currency Economy
When I decided to join a group of hikers to study preservation efforts and ecology in Cuba, I was prepared to encounter one of the world's remaining communist stalwarts. Indeed, I entered a split world, fittingly described as steeped in contradiction....
From Minnesota to the World - Once a Tiny Hospital Caring for Norwegian Immigrants, Fairview Hospital Today Serves the World through Its Sponsorship of Medical Missions
It started a century ago with a small ethnic hospital intended for Twin Cities' Norwegians. Today, from Nicaragua to Nepal, Mexico to Mongolia, Kosovo to Kenya, thousands of people have found their lives improved by volunteers from Minnesota's Fairview...
From This Month's Menu
The midterm congressional elections, which are the subject of the Special Report in Current Issues, are taking place in an atmosphere of war talk and preparation. World Views--Remembering 9/11 samples international press reaction on the first anniversary...
Generals and Presidents
Book World this month has a review of Supreme Command: Soldiers, Statesmen, and Leadership in Wartime by Eliot Cohen. I agree that war is too important to be left to the generals. I also agree that it is too important to be left to statesmen. Everything...
How the Brain Perceives Pain
By investigating the nervous system, scientists are beginning to discover how we feel hurt when our body is damaged or fails to function properly. ********** Editor's Note: This article is the first in a two-part series on pain and examines...
How the Brain Perceives Pain - Pain and Memory
As late as the 1980s, it was thought that what goes on in the brain is somehow less real than what goes on in the rest of the body. Doctors assumed it was less important to alleviate pain than to treat the underlying injury or disease. We now know...
In Montreal, Comedy Is Serious Business - the Just for Laughs Festival
After twenty seasons, Just For Laughs, Montreal's huge international comedy festival, is a must for any comic seeking stardom, as well as anyone craving a good guffaw. Imagine yourself in a raucous series of close encounters with some of the...
Interview with the Ethiopian Ambassador
"Ethiopia Has Been Fighting Terrorism Single-Handedly...Now There is a Global Initiative and That Makes It Easier" A Candid Confersation With Ambassador Kassahun of Ethiopia The following is an exclusive interview with Kassahun Ayele, ambassador...
Interview with the Ethiopian Ambassador - Abyssinian History
The history of Ethiopia, known to many as Abyssinia, extends back to ancient times and remains partly unknown. Anthropologists believe that East Africa's Great Rift Valley is the site of humankind's origin. Scientists discovered the remains of Lucy...
Leonardo Lives On
Martin Gani is a British freelance writer based in Italy. He writes for a number of cultural, travel, language, and general-interest periodicals, including The World & I, and for many inflight magazines. Some five hundred years after his...
Liquid Gold in California - amid the Award-Winning Wineries of Napa and Sonoma Counties, Pioneering Olive Growers Are Beginning to Acquire Gold Medals for Their New Generation of World-Class California Extra-Virgin Olive Oil
On a glorious, sky blue day in early November, I wandered among groves of heavily fruited trees and picked my first olive. The hard little oval fruit, a Frantoio variety, dangled flirtatiously from its long, cherry-like stem. The splotches of dark...
Malthus Revisited
John Attarian is a freelance writer living in Ann Arbor, Michigan. He specializes in economic topics, among others, and is a frequent contributor to The World & I. In discussions of population, one almost invariably encounters the name Malthus....
Margaret Fuller - Forgotten American Heroine
Michael Timko is professor emeritus at the City University of New York. He has written frequently for The World & I; his article "Queen Victoria and Mrs. Brown" appeared in the May 2002 issue. It is not disrespectful, in spite of recent events,...
Mixed Breed - A Profile of Julia Alvarez
Linda Simon is professor of English at Skidmore College and a frequent contributor to The World & I. The author of Genuine Reality: A Life of William James (Harcourt Brace, 1998), Of Virtue Rare (1982), Thornton Wilder: His World (1979), and...
Necessity or Anachronism?
In the East Room of the White House in November 1967, President Lyndon Johnson proudly announced another novel experiment. Johnson, the architect of the Great Society welfare programs, told supporters that the bill he was signing would do no less...
On the Trail of a Cancer Cure
The man who discovered cancer-causing genes, a milestone that opened up new vistas in the understanding, diagnosis, and treatment of many cancers, almost became an English professor instead. Though the son of a physician and a psychiatric social...
Paul Stankard - TheArt of Ambiguity
"Are the flowers real?" people invariably wonder when they see Paul Stankard's beauteous floral settings and incredibly lifelike insects hovering in glass. Yet, soon the viewers must ask whether they have ever seen full-grown flowers only an inch...
Shock-Headed Peter - Heinrich Hoffmann's Amusing Dark Tales
My Uncle Adolf was an exceptional man. He was a master carpenter, and he and his second cousin Fritz expanded their fathers' chair-building workshop into a nationwide enterprise in Germany. I'll never forget his firm handshake, with its unmistakable...
South Asians in the Melting Pot
Until recently, players in the Washington, D.C., Cricket League, the majority of whom originally hail from India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, or other South Asian nations, had reason to be extremely optimistic about the future. In the 1980s and '90s,...
The Battle for Congress - Control Depends upon the Outcome of about 25 Too-Close-To Call Contests in the House and Half a Dozen Races in the Senate
August 27, 1957: "Senator, I've got the biggest birthday present of all for you: Me," cooed Bill Proxmire, who had just won a special election for the Senate in Wisconsin, to Sen. Lyndon B. Johnson (D-Texas). As he interrupted his 49th birthday...
The Egyptian Museum at 100
Thanks to the fine, Neoclassical work of French architect Marcel Dourgnon, the Egyptian Museum in downtown Cairo has proved a splendid showcase of pharaonic antiquity. To one side of bustling Midan el-Tahrir (Liberty Square), in the heart of...
The Honey Reed's Bittersweet Legacy
Sugarcane's history, involving war, trade, colonization, slavery, diet, and disease, paved the way for today's massive production and widespread use of sweeteners. Most of us think of sugar in terms of personal-sized servings: a teaspoonful for...
The Presidential Factor - Bush's High Approval Ratings Should Help Republicans in Close Races Unless the Economy Turns Sour
A near certainty in American politics for decades has been that the party of the president loses congressional seats in the midterm elections. But after the terrorist acts of September 11, 2001, and with the extraordinary public approval of President...
The Races in Other States
It was in the gubernatorial races, where Republicans have dominated for the past decade, that the Democrats were likely to make their biggest gains in 2002. Republicans held 27 governorships, including those of all of the biggest electoral states...
The Return of Sitting Bull - Recalling the Life of the Great Sioux Chief
I am Tatanka Yotanka, Sitting Bull in your language. I passed on to the land of the Fathers 111 of your white years ago. Now I travel once again through the area that was the trail of hardship to my people. I see superficial changes upon the face...
The Uncertain Midterm Elections
Midterm elections usually have a rhythm all their own, with most races being decided by local issues and local campaigns. Occasionally, as in 1994's Contract with America, a national issue will emerge to make a difference at the local level. But...
What Good Is Etiquette? Gift Giving
When giving a gift in Zambia, begin by sitting down with your hosts and conversing for a while. If visiting a home, find a young child and ask him to take the gift to his mommy or daddy. You can then say: "I brought something small to help you in...
What Good Is Etiquette? Understanding the Norms of Good Behavior in Zambia
An American woman was a foreign aid worker in a Near Eastern country in the 1970s. One day, the indigenous aid employees and their foreign counterparts were holding a workshop at a hotel. They were all taking a break, relaxing and swimming in the...