The World and I

World and I is an encyclopedic journal that includes world news; developments in science, the arts and philosophy; book reviews; and photo essays. Since it was founded in 1986, it is printed monthly. The journal is published by Washington Times Corp.Subjects for World and I include science; literature and literary reviews; food and cooking; art; travel and tourism; politics; philosophy; music and musical instruments; drama and theatre. The editor is Steve Osmond.

Articles from Vol. 17, No. 8, August

Affirmative Action
Since the early days of affirmative action, I have been opposed to it. However, as the dean of the Law School of the University of Michigan explained its affirmative action program in the New York Times, I am sympathetic to it. G.E. Zuriff's article...
Alaska: America's Final Frontier - Because of the State's Boom-and-Bust History, Many Residents Have Deep Concerns about the Future
Alaska is an untamed, exciting place many Americans dream of someday experiencing. Special it is, and few appreciate its uniqueness and frontier spirit more than Alaskans themselves. Throughout the state, there are people who survive by living off...
Alaska: America's Final Frontier - in Love with Alaska
Don't expect someone just home from three glorious days on a snazzy boat in Prince William Sound with good friends and great fishing to write objectively about Alaska. It was easy to forget winter--the season Alaskans love to hate--while surrounded...
A Tale of Two States
Alaska and Hawaii are among our most unconventional states, starting with the obvious fact that they lie outside the continental boundaries of the United States. They have several other things in common--a large indigenous population, environmental...
Atonement - Evolution of Ian Macabre
Ian McEwan is now recognized as one of the most eminent British novelists of his generation. Atonement won the 2002 W.H. Smith Literary Award. His previous novel, Amsterdam, won the Booker Prize. Early in his career, however, he was regularly called...
A Touch of Japan - the Morikami Museum and Japanese Gardens
In 1974, wealthy planter George Morikami donated land in Delray Beach, Florida, to promote cultural understanding. Today, magnificent Japanese-style architecture and landscaping fulfill this noble purpose. A sea of tranquillity awaits just seven...
Closed to the outside - Pollution Covers an Arctic Siberian City
On October 30, 2001, Russian Prime Minister Mikhail Kasyanov signed a decree designating Norilsk "closed," a reversion to the status this Siberian city held in communist times. Since the collapse of the USSR, Russia has generally opened to the...
Discovering Salisbury - the Medieval Roots of This English City Built in the Shadow of Stonehenge Have Been Preserved throughout the Centuries
"Land is not land alone, something that simply is itself. Land partakes of what we breathe into it, is touched by our moods and memories." When V.S. Naipaul wrote those words, he was really talking about the atmosphere that spreads over Wiltshire,...
'Fight No More Forever' - 125th Anniversary of the Battle at Big Hole
In 1877, about 750 Nez Perce Indians fled Idaho following demands from the U.S. Army under Gen. Oliver Howard that their tribe move to a small reservation. The Army was enforcing a policy of displacing all Native Americans onto reservations to make...
'Fight No More Forever' - Chief Joseph
Born in the Wallowa Valley of eastern Oregon, Chief Joseph lived from 1840 to 1904. He is commonly called Young Joseph, to distinguish him from his father. Old Joseph had become a Christian and had his son baptized as Ephraim. Young Joseph's Nez...
'Fight No More Forever' - the Nez Perce
The name the Nez Perce give themselves is Nimipu or Cupnitpelu, meaning "The People Marching Out of the Woods," but the French term Nez Perce (meaning "pierced nose") has stuck with them. It was probably first applied to them by a French-Canadian...
Flogging a Trojan Horse - Tantalus Fails to Tantalize
Like the unfortunate character in the title role, the audience at a Denver production of Tantalus was condemned to perpetual dissatisfaction--at an overly pretentious, two-day retelling of the Trojan War. The ancient Athenians were fond of tragic...
For Good Fortune - the Amulet Market in Bangkok
In the heart of old Bangkok is an open-air market called Ta Pra Chan. It specializes in amulets, the tiny images of Buddhas that Thais wear around their necks or hang in their cars. Dealers display their goods in large glass cases, with small signs...
Halal Novelist - Western and Islamic Civilizations Dialogue in Sudanese Writer Leila Aboulela's Fiction
Charles R. Larson, professor of literature at American University, is the author of The Ordeal of the African Writer and numerous other critical works. There have been few success stories involving African writers, as the profiles of Cyprian...
Hawaii: America's Paradise? 'A Lovely Fleet of Islands'
Everyone in the world would like to come to Hawaii. The population is truly a melting pot; there are more minority peoples in Hawaii than in any other state. In fact, the minorities are the majority! According to the 2000 census, Caucasians are...
Hawaii: America's Paradise? Although They Suffered on the Front Lines in a World War and Now Are Caught in the Middle of a Global Economic Crisis Hawaiians Would Never Live Anywhere Else
Ancient Hawaiians are believed to have settled the islands more than a thousand years ago. The scholar Herb Kane says that "everyone in Hawaii, even Hawaiians, comes from somewhere else." The primary islands became independent kingdoms, and Hawaiians...
Helping Others See a New World - Volunteer Optometric Services to Humanity (VOSH) Helps Bring a Blurry World into Focus by Sending Volunteer Eye Care Teams to Developing Countries
The Mexican sun blazes, but the men, women, and children squinting into the harsh light are hopeful that soon the sun will seem even brighter. They are all patients waiting for an eye exam, and, for most, it will be their first ever. Pat Seyer,...
How to Teach Religion in Public Schools
Earlier this year, a kindergartner named Kayla was told she couldn't pray with her friends during lunch. Her family filed suit against her New York school district, and a federal judge ordered the school to allow the girl to pray while the trial...
Is Racial and Ethnic Diversity Educationally Beneficial?
G.E. Zuriff is professor of psychology at Wheaton College (Norton, Massachusetts) and clinical psychologist in the Medical Department at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Now wending their way through the appeals process to the Supreme...
Mapping the Geography of Symbiosis
Wherever she looks--in the mud, the air, the cells of plants and animals, termite guts, or the tails of sperm--Lynn Margulis sees evidence of ancient microbial mergers or primary ongoing microbial activity sustaining life at all levels. Nineteen-year-old...
NORAD: Watchdog of the Skies
The events of September 11, 2001, have changed the lives of every American. They have definitely changed the lives of the men and women who monitored the radars and, horror-stricken, witnessed firsthand the four airliners crash into the World Trade...
Opening College Doors
Stung by racial discrimination throughout his life, Silas Purnell finally decided to fight back at the age of 43 by using the younger generation of blacks as a weapon--not by inciting them to revolt but by getting them into college. When the dust...
Our Energy Appetite
For two centuries, the U.S. economy flourished as energy consumption doubled every 25 years; but in the last quarter century, we have begun to use energy more carefully. For most of U.S. history, this country's citizens have associated economic...
Our Energy Appetite - Energy Costs for Home and Car
Most of us routinely pay for gasoline, electricity, and heating fuel (natural gas or oil). These bills vary widely from family to family, but let us consider average costs for U.S. residents, based on data from the Department of Energy. Gasoline....
Recovery and Return - Bosnia in the Aftermath of Ethnic Hostilities
They evacuated their apartment when the bombardment of Sarajevo began in 1992, leaving before shells struck the building. After surviving the 43-month siege, they repaired their apartment. Now Dragan and Borjanka Majura and their daughter Mia, a...
Recovery and Return - Muslims Return to Two Communities
The return of Muslims has gone very differently in a village and town only a few miles apart in Bosnia. Pocitelj is a picturesque village set on hillsides rising above the Neretva River. It had gained international recognition for its centuries-old...
Recovery and Return - Students Reflect on Return
The accounts of several university students, returnees to the Bosnian city of Mostar after the war, express diverse experiences and reflect very different responses to what they encountered. These comments were made during a class project. English...
Revealing the Universal - the Ping Chong Dance Company
From his youth, spent in New York's Chinatown, dancer/choreographer Ping Chong's self-identity has been shaped by the distance he felt from the greater world. Today, his dance company mirrors that experience. Sitting in a quiet coffee shop on...
Russia Joins NATO
The new international order ITALY--"Russia is an ally of the Alliance and for the first time in history Europe is united, free and in peace": with these words, President Bush described the pact on security between NATO and Moscow that rewards...
Single-Sex Education - Ready for Prime Time?
Leonard Sax, Ph.D., is a family physician and psychologist practicing in Montgomery County, Maryland. He is the founder of the National Association for the Advancement of Single Sex Public Education [on the Web at www.SingleSexSchools.org]. John...
The Mingan Archipelago - in the St. Lawrence River, off the Northern Shore of Quebec, a Collection of Little-Known Islands Is a Sea Kayaking Paradise
In the middle of the tiny coastal village of Havre-Saint-Pierre, Quebec, just down the street from the Catholic church and a short walk up from the beach, is an unassuming wooden frame building. The structure is like many other weather-beaten edifices...
The New, New NATO
Do not adjust your memory. A sense of deja vu is entirely appropriate as Russia and NATO dance gingerly together again in the 12-year minuet that seeks to bury the Cold War while keeping on life support the institution that won it. At least this...
The Phenomenal Paderewski
Sixty-one years after his death and a decade since his remains at last returned to his beloved homeland, Poland's great pianist, composer, and statesman deserves new renown. It is impossible to write about Ignacy Jan Paderewski without superlatives....
The Ultimate Clean Knife
A high-speed stream of nitrogen is emerging as a tool for applications ranging from decontaminating steel in nuclear plants to cutting meats and removing paint from airplanes. Extraordinary demands require extraordinary responses. So it was that...
Vladimir Kush - Metaphorical Explorations
When Moscow-born artist Vladimir Kush was a child of three or four, he would sit on his father's lap and finish drawings that his father began. "My father was a scientist specializing in differential equations, but everyone on his side of the family...
We Still Have an Energy Crisis
Americans may not have learned obvious lessons from past eras of global energy problems. We import more of our petroleum than at any time in our history; we don't take energy efficiency seriously; we ignore basic signs of impending energy problems;...
Who's the Most Objective Anchor?
The resignation of NBC celebrity anchorman Tom Brokaw, announced in late May and effective after the November 2004 presidential election, causes us to revisit the perennial question of who among the "big three" anchormen is tops in terms of objectivity,...
Who's the Most Objective Anchor? NBC's Changing of the Guard
Biologically, it was inevitable. People get older, retire, and must be replaced. And so it was with Tom Brokaw, who, along with fellow anchormen Dan Rather and Peter Jennings, has become not only a celebrity but an American icon, a rock amid...