The World and I

World and I is an encyclopedic journal that includes world news; developments in science, the arts and philosophy; book reviews; and photo essays. Since it was founded in 1986, it is printed monthly. The journal is published by Washington Times Corp.Subjects for World and I include science; literature and literary reviews; food and cooking; art; travel and tourism; politics; philosophy; music and musical instruments; drama and theatre. The editor is Steve Osmond.

Articles from Vol. 17, No. 7, July

A Bounty of Backyard Berries - Plant a Bounty of Berries
Blackberry (Rubus ulnifolius; R. ursinus). Like raspberries, both the thorny and thornless varieties of blackberry need to be tamed in the home landscape, trained to trellises or fences. The small, roselike white or pink blossoms are followed by...
A Bourgeois Manque - in This Rediscovered Masterpiece, One of Central Europe's Finest Writers Poses Fundamental Questions about Human Existence
Lee Congdon writes regularly on Hungarian culture. His most recent book is Seeing Red: Hungarian Intellectuals in Exile and the Challenge of Communism (Northern Illinois University Press). Book Info:EMBERS Sandor Marai Translated by Carol Brown...
A Colder War - Taking the Long View of the War on Terror
Alan W. Dowd is a freelance writer based in Indianapolis. His article "Taking the High Ground: The U.S. Military Marches Into Space" appeared in the May 2002 issue of The World & I. According to a report released by the National Security Council,...
Another Little Story Comes along - A Profile of Alice Munro
Linda Simon is professor of English at Skidmore College and a frequent contributor to The World & I. The author of Genuine Reality: A Life of William James (Harcourt Brace, 1998), Of Virtue Rare (1982), Thornton Wilder, His World (1979), and...
A Stone That Won't Roll - Struggling to Aid Development in Zambia
Hunter Nielson, a Peace Corps volunteer in eastern Zambia, is ranting and railing. He's using an African tongue I don't understand, but I get the gist. Inflection makes that possible, along with Nielson's down- turned mouth and forehead, tensely...
City in the Wilderness - Manaus Is the Hub of Brazil's Western Amazon
Except for its distinctive Brazilian character, Manaus, a city of 1.5 million people, could comfortably be situated anywhere in the modern world. You might never guess that you were in the middle of the planet's largest rain forest. But Manaus is...
City in the Wilderness - Paris of the Tropics
One has to travel the Amazon to even glimpse the mind-boggling size of the forest it traverses. Probably no one has ever known this better than those men who traveled the great river before the age of engines. Francisco de Orellana, a conquistador,...
Dancing the Silk Road
Long ago and far away, the women along the Silk Road, from China to the Mediterranean, created colorful, evocative dance forms. Thanks to an inspired troupe in Washington, D.C., we can experience them today. They dance in sumptuous costumes and...
From This Month's Menu
Nationalist feeling often arises as a response to a sense of damaged dignity and frustration at domestic difficulties. It has arisen in Russia as a popular reaction to the confusion of postcommunist arrangements and the loss of Russian power in...
Gold along Grasshopper Creek - A Montana Ghost Town Clings to Life
In the early 1800s, Lewis and Clark passed through the western Rocky Mountains. They named one local stream they encountered Willard Creek. No whites settled in the area until July 1862, when a group of prospectors from Colorado camped along the...
Gold along Grasshopper Creek - A Reconstructed Ghost Town
Nevada City would probably be just a stretch of open highway except for two families. The first were the Finneys, one of the last families to live there. By 1880 the town was practically abandoned. Dredges, which had been brought in to get at the...
Grade-School Gay Influence
The campaign in the nation's schools to push for homosexual, bisexual, and "transgenderism" tolerance continues to grow, but it faces sustained opposition from profamily groups who say their core moral and religious beliefs are being redefined as...
Grade-School Gay Influence - the Health Threat to Homosexuals
While tolerance of homosexuality is increasingly taught in America's schools, very little is said about the extreme health risks associated with it. Life expectancy of homosexuals has been found to be approximately 41 years, according to a 1994...
Heartbeats, Full of Love and Sorrow - Love Intertwines with Hope, Loss, Regret, and Grief in Alice Munro's Latest Stories
Linda Simon is professor of English at Skidmore College and a frequent contributor to The World & I. The author of Genuine Reality: A Life of William James (Harcourt Brace, 1998), Of Virtue Rare (1982), Thornton Wilder, His World (1979), and...
Hong Kong: Five Years after Handover
I didn't know it at the time. It was 1960, and Hong Kong was just a four-day stopover on my way to other destinations. What I didn't know was that Hong Kong was a dangerous, habit-forming narcotic. As time went by, I discovered that Hong Kong...
Justice for All - for Almost Two Decades, Shahnaz Bokhari Has Been Leading the Fight to Protect Abused Pakistani Women in a Blatantly Male-Dominated Society
After Humaira Hussein died in March 2002, her husband convinced police the death had been a suicide despite testimony by her family. While Humaira was a long-suffering battered wife, they said, her spirit had not been beaten. Feeling their continued...
Living Two Religions
Why did well-known Harvard theologian Harvey Cox, a Baptist minister and lifelong Christian, marry a Jewish woman 17 years ago and then become an observer of the Jewish religious calendar, even agreeing to raise their son in the religion of Moses?...
More Troubles in the Middle East
A meeting not connected with reality ISRAEL--Because the confirmation that the May 7 attack was definitely a suicide bombing arrived only at the end of the meeting, the conversation between President Bush and Prime Minister Sharon appears in ...
Pope Pius XI and the Jewish Question
Richard L. Rubenstein is President Emeritus and Distinguished Professor of Religion at the University of Bridgeport and Lawton Distinguished Professor of Religion Emeritus at Florida State University. He is the author of After Auschwitz and The...
Removing the Roadblocks to Reform - Foreign-Invested Companies Provide Half of All Chinese Exports and Much-Needed Jobs. the Leadership Wants to Expand This Sector through Competition Induced by WTO Membership
Last October in Shanghai, I struck up a conversation with a group of Chinese college women volunteering for the meetings of the Asia Pacific Economic Cooperation forum. At first they were shy about speaking English, but the discussion turned lively...
Return to the Highlands - the Author Follows a Trail of Memories on a Sentimental Journey to a Distant Part of Scotland
Thirty years ago, my husband and I lived for several months in an old stone cottage on the northern coast of the Scottish Highlands. Ever since, we've treasured our memories of the simple life we led in that remote, wildly beautiful region. Still,...
Saving Darwinism from Itself
Darwin's theory--that evolution proceeds by a process of natural selection--becomes comprehensive and credible only when it is rescued from the sterile reductionism permeating modern biology. If Darwinism is correct, why is it still controversial?...
Silence on Welfare Reform
Six years ago, much of the news media--particularly the journalists who work at the three major broadcast networks and leading newspapers such as the New York Times--couldn't get enough of the story about the historic welfare reform law that a Republican...
Silence on Welfare Reform - Swelling the Welfare-to-Workforce Flow
By virtually all accounts, the 1996 welfare reform law has been a breathtaking success, taking people off the welfare rolls in droves and decreasing poverty, especially for children. Yet only 42 percent of Americans who receive welfare benefits...
Stars of the Sea
Endowed with attractive designs, remarkable hunting and feeding skills, and the unusual ability to regenerate broken parts, starfish are fascinating creatures that play a vital role in marine ecosystems. Many years ago, oystermen encountered an...
Terrorism - the German Connection
Khalid Duran, a Muslim of Moroccan-Spanish heritage, has taught Islamic studies, sociology, and anthropology at universities in Pakistan, Austria, Germany, Scandinavia, and the United States. A profile of him, entitled "Religion Bridger," appeared...
The Catholic Church and Anti-Semitism
The Roman Catholic Church has suffered severe criticism recently because of the many stories that have surfaced about priests who sexually abused young people. The cover-ups and outrageous reassignments that some dioceses engaged in have received...
The 'Glue' That Holds China Together - Deng Xiaoping Encouraged the Populace to Study China's History and Past Accomplishments to Revive Feelings of Pride and Gain Support for His Economic Reforms
When Deng Xiaoping assumed the mantle of political power in 1978, he set in motion reforms that significantly changed China. Maoist China had been communist, totalitarian, egalitarian, and poor. Deng's China would be very different. Deng started...
The High Art of the Low
(Per SFO, take lead-in from TOC. TOC is not done yet.) Currently at the Guggenheim Museum Bilbao through September 2 is a show of 250 works, entitled Paris, Capital of the Arts 1900--1968. This exhibition is misnamed; Paris, in fact, ceased to...
The Rise of Chinese Nationalism
A specter is haunting China--an aggressive nationalism that touches every aspect of Chinese society, from politics to education to foreign policy. Its shadow can be found in modern Chinese history, which is taught as a series of guo chi, or national...
The Roots of Chinese Xenophobia - during Most of the Twentieth Century, Chinese Schools Taught History as a Series of Guo Chi, or National Humiliations Caused by Foreign Powers
In 1900, the American public reacted with horror to newspaper accounts describing a siege of hundreds of foreign diplomats and civilians who were trapped inside a diplomatic compound in Peking, China. The atrocities committed by some members of...
The Ultimate Boom Box
With the recent debut of digital satellite radio, automobile owners may obtain crystal-clear reception of their favorite programming even while driving across the country. You have a long trip ahead, and you've made all the preparations. You've...
The Ultimate Boom Box - WorldSpace: A Global Vision
WorldSpace Corporation was the first company to offer digital satellite radio. Founded in 1990 and headquartered in Washington, D.C., it was initially set up to provide audio broadcasts to Africa, to help stop the spread of AIDS. The company soon...
Thick Pile Legacy - the Enduring Turkish Rug
Wandering Istanbul's mazelike grand bazaar, I was attracted to a large rug with an intricate floral design displayed in one store. A young vendor materialized next to me as I studied the rug through the window. "Do you like it?" "Very pretty."...
Tim Pitts - Eye on Suffering
After spending twenty-five years in the investment business, Tim Pitts became smitten by photography. "I believe that the human emotions are stories in and of themselves," says the Baltimore native. "Whether witnessing individuals at play, at work,...
Violence in the Middle East
April brought death and destruction to Palestinians and Israelis. On March 27, a Hamas suicide bomber slaughtered 29 persons and injured dozens more at a Passover seder in Netanya. Three days later, Prime Minister Ariel Sharon ordered Israel's armed...
'Virtual' Child Porn Ban Ruled Overbroad
Citing Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet and the movies Traffic and American Beauty as potential violations of the Child Pornography Protection Act of 1996 (CPPA), the Supreme Court struck down the law as overbroad, violating the First Amendment's...