Hecate

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Articles from Vol. 41, No. 1-2, May-November

About That Flag
He might shouldn't have done that, people said, the double-conditional being a quirky locution heard frequently in the South. He might should've done that anywhere but in a church and during a prayer meeting, others said, the use of the double-conditional...
A Fragmented Life: Writing Intergenerational Trauma in Morgan Yasbincek's Liv
In this article I engage trauma theory to analyse the narrative strategies that Morgan Yasbincek deploys in the novel liv (2000). I demonstrate how Yasbincek makes the expression of creative emergence from catastrophically fracturing intergenerational...
"A Meaningful Freedom": Women, Work and the Promise of Modernity in a Reading of the Letters of Raden Adjeng Kartini (Java) Alongside Miles Franklin's My Brilliant Career (Australia)
Raden Adjeng Kartini (1879-1904) and Stella Miles Franklin (1879-1954) were contemporaries. They were born in 1879--Kartini in Java in what was then the Dutch East Indies (Indonesia) and Miles Franklin in the Monaro region of New South Wales, Australia....
Body, Violence and Space: Anne Devlin's "Naming the Names"
Even though women's participation in the Irish Republican struggle has a long history, women were often disembodied as cultural symbols in the nationalist imaginary, and the multiple forms of their political agency overlooked. Anne Devlin's short story...
Editorial
On Australia Day of 2015, domestic violence campaigner Rosie Batty was named Australian of the Year. Batty's twelve-year-old son, Luke, was murdered by his father in Melbourne in early 2014, while he played cricket with his friends. Since that day, when...
"I Am Not That Girl": Disturbance, Creativity, Play, Echoes, Liminality, Self-Reflection and Stream of Consciousness in Eimear McBride's A Girl Is a Half-Formed Thing
In A Girl is a Half-formed Thing (2013), Eimear McBride revitalises the stream of consciousness of James Joyce, Virginia Woolf, and Samuel Beckett, emphasising fluidity and constraint. The novel, a woman's form of non-memoir, enacts the difficulties...
In the Land of Mer
The Land of Mer (1) She is home now, in the depth of murky green water, no longer holding on to the belief that she will transcend her own inability to be human and walk as one who has an eternity. This is a story of not being seen, of not being heard...
Living "Willfully": The Same-Sex Marriage Ceremony of "Michael Field" by the Smutt River
This article focuses on the relationship and life writings of the late-Victorian writing collaboration known as "Michael Field." It considers the notion of willfulness developed by Sara Ahmed in Willful Subjects as a way of interpreting Katharine Bradley...
March of Little Magazines
The counter culture days bred many myths. Charles Simic recently recalled "the biggest and most illustrious gathering" of poets, a conference in the United States in 1968 ending in a grand fisticuffs between warring factions (Simic "The Great Poets'...
Matrilineal Narratives: Learning from Voices and Objects
The matrilineal line is a precious connection although it is sometimes disrupted and marked by absence. In this paper we explore notions of generational connections and loss among women in our families. Three women scholars from a regional university,...
Narratives of the "Not-So-Good Nurse": Rewriting Nursing's Virtue Script
The prolonged commemoration of the ANZAC centenary has flooded popular culture with images of the self-sacrificing, ever-reliable, ably-competent and often feisty, forthright, female nurse. This notion of 'the good nurse" is prevalent and promulgates...
Playing against Type: Approaches to Genre in the Work of Helen Garner and Kate Jennings
This paper examines the autobiographical fiction of Australian authors Helen Garner and Kate Jennings and shows how these texts engage with and disrupt notions of genre. The texts examined are Garner's Monkey Grip (1977) and The Spare Room (2008); and...
Traumatic Cosmopolitanism: Eleanor Dark and the World at War
This essay argues that women writers working during and prior to the Second World War produced works which might be identified as examples of "traumatic cosmopolitanism"--that is, a cosmopolitanism forged through the shared experience of trauma. In narrativising...
Why Do We Close the Door on Domestic Violence?
It's a Monday evening, the sky is gracefully passing through its twilight phase and I've spent the last hour in the kitchen, baking melting moments. My girlfriend comes out of the study, exhausted from marking, just as I'm taking the cookies out of the...
Zadie Smith's "White Knuckle Ride": From "Black Woman Writer" to "Acclaimed Novelist and Critic"
This paper investigates British novelist and critic Zadie Smith's authorial persona as a construction of marketing strategies, critical reception and her own public pronouncements and nonfictional writing. It engages with key concepts of race and multiculturalism--how...
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