Hecate

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Articles from Vol. 43, No. 1-2, May-November

Angela Carter's Revelations and Revaluations of Dark Desires: Unwinding the Winding Sheets of Constraining Myths and Horror
Angela Carter's writing has its dissonant roots in medieval literature (which she studied), myth, and the influential horror of the great masters, whose sexualised idolatry of dead women (Edgar Allen Poe) and disgust at women and sex as monstrous (H.P....
'Being Made into a Machine': An Extract from Eleanor Dark's Unpublished Novel 'Pilgrimage'
Eleanor Dark's novel "Pilgrimage" has never been published. She began writing it in January 1921, a year before her marriage, and finished it in the late 1920s, when she and Eric Dark were establishing their home in Katoomba. (1) In the early 1930s,...
Cover Art: Vivienne Binns: Orgasm and Lots More Besides
Vivienne Binns is best known for her bold, experimental paintings that emit a powerful sexual energy. In the 1970s, she contributed significantly to feminist art in Australia through paintings that express female desire, pleasure, and ecstasy. Orgasm...
Desire as Excess: Patriarchal Control and Resistance in South Asian (Indian) Women's Writing
From the colonial period to and in the seventy years following India's political independence from British governance, Indian women writers have pushed against the boundaries and borders of sexual politics in their writing. They have emerged as authors...
Dislocation, Feminine Writing, and Nomadic Experience in Shahrnush Parsipur's Women without Men
The condition of exile may relate to experiences that are not explicitly defined as imposed exclusion from one's home. Instead, exile may refer to intellectual and internal displacement within the borders of one's country. Shahrnush Parsipur's Women...
Editorial
This issue of Hecate prints papers presented at the Excess and Desire conference in February 2017. (1) A central topic of many of them is that of gendered corporeality, especially as this is represented in literary and cultural production that comes...
Excessive Becomings: Rethinking Women and Militancy
What are the affects of violence and what do they do, particularly with regard to literary representations of women insurgents in political conflicts? Do the affective forces of militancy lie only in pain and horror? In this essay I explore the links...
Feminist Fables and Alexis Wright's Art of the Fabulous in the Swan Book
Two recent award-winning Australian novels, both of a dystopian cast of mind, Alexis Wright's The Swan Book (2013) and Charlotte Wood's The Natural Way of Things (2015), employ fable to tell powerful contemporary stories. In both novels the issues explored...
From 'Running as Fast as I Can'
A JOURNEY IS not just marked by things. It is marked by our lived experience. My story is informed by my lived experience of the National Party government of Joh Bjelke-Petersen who became Premier of Queensland in 1968. The Queensland State parliament...
Mimetic Desire and Abjection: The Social Construction of Woman in Winterson's the Passion and McBride's A Girl Is a Half-Formed Thing
The construction of women as social objects is a prevalent theme of women's literature that challenges the phallocratic grand narrative of Western history that limits the space of women in society. This same grand narrative has constructed the social...
Othered Body, Obscene Self(ie): A Sartrean Reading of Kim Kardashian-West
In this existential reading of Kim Kardashian-West's International Women's Day selfie of 2016, I focus on the rise of selfie culture and public discourse around emerging digital representations of women's bodies. The selfie is a relatively new phenomenon,...
Particular Bodies: Exploring a Corporeal Writing
Can women have some other way of writing? If so, what is it? Such questions have been asked in literary theory for a long time, and now, as a writer, I tried to gain my own understanding of the creative process. French theorists Helene Cixous and Luce...
Postcolonial Recollections of a Colonial Encounter: Eliade's Bengal Nights and Devi's It Does Not Die
Mircea Eliade's Bengal Nights and Maitreyi Devi's It Does Not Die created a long controversy, but instead of "he said, she said" they could be captioned as "he saw, she saw" since the final mystery of apparent desertion and heartbreak is not cleared...
Schoolgirl Sex and Excess: Exploring Narratives of Japanese Girlhood and Compensated Dating in Ruth Ozeki's Novel A Tale for the Time Being
Asian American novelist Ruth Ozeki's 2013 novel A Tale for the Time Being presents a dual narrative of Japanese schoolgirl Nao, and fictional author Ruth. Ozeki problematises the schoolgirl image by embracing and subverting the stereotypical tropes of...
Sexual Shame and Subjectivity in Lorrie Moore's 'Two Boys'
This article employs theorisations of love and sexual shame by Jessica Benjamin and Simone de Beauvoir, to examine the Lorrie Moore short story "Two Boys." Complementing the discussions of these concepts by Benjamin and Beauvoir with Julia Kristeva's...
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