Hemisphere

Hemisphere is a magazine specializing in Social Science topics.

Articles from Vol. 8, No. 1, Fall

A Call for Action
Browse through a national newspaper in almost any part of the world; several times a year, you will find reports of yet another major natural disaster that has destroyed the lives and livelihoods of thousands--if not hundreds of thousands--of individuals....
A Matter of Choice; Natural Events Can Turn Disastrous If Abetted by Society's Choices
Natural processes, punctuated by dramatic events, shape our landscapes, flush our reefs and estuaries, and form our soils. Hurricanes, earthquakes, landslides, and volcanic eruptions are all too easily forgotten environmental management issues which...
At Risk: Natural Hazards, People's Vulnerability, and Disasters
Disasters and Everyday Life Most disaster studies focus on the dramatic role played by hazard events--the havoc raised by an earthquake, a tornado, or a flood. In contrast, social scientists argue that the context in which an event occurs creates the...
Ecotourism: Fad or Future?
The tourism industry in the Caribbean has long been a vital source of income for the development of the region. Its expansion, however, has also been identified as a major threat to the region's environmental stability. The industry's improper disposal...
From Rubble to Reconstruction
The Great Peruvian Earthquake of May 31, 1970, occurred at 3:23 p.m. on a tranquil Sunday. A disaster often disrupts and divides time itself: everyone in Peru remembers where they were and what they were doing at that fateful moment. Disasters, in general,...
'Green' Insurgencies
A recent article in the Viewpoint section of the Miami Herald(1) ("Economic Gap Fuels Insurgencies," by Andrew A. Reding) called attention to the widening gap between rich and poor in Latin America and the Caribbean. Using statistics supplied by the...
Quest for Power Saves Trees, Too
Brazil has a long history of sophisticated foreign policy at the regional and global levels yet a relatively short history of significant domestic environmental policy. Since the late 1980s, with the international outcry in response to the burning of...
Reducing Vulnerability
The prevailing approach of aid and recovery programs has emphasized short-term relief, with little linkage to sustainable development, local roles and capacities, and diverse social, economic, and cultural conditions. This approach presumes that, without...
Sustaining Sustainable Development
The end of the Cold War and the deepening of economic globalization have spurred a transition in relations among the nations and peoples of the Western Hemisphere. Six trends have thus far defined this process: the reengagement of the United States within...
The Day the Earth Shook
"Can anything seem adequately safe to anyone, if the world itself is shaken and its most solid parts collapse?" These words were written by the Roman philosopher Seneca in AD 62 after an earthquake destroyed much of the ancient city of Pompeii. Tens...
The Wealth of Nations
In the new accounting system for measuring a nation's wealth, a value is assigned to natural resources that are not in use, while resource depletion is counted as a "cost" to be calculated in pricing mechanisms and market competitiveness. Thus, environmental...