The Historian

The Historian is a journal that publishes contemporary and relevant historical scholarship. The Historian also publishes extensive book reviews covering a wide array of recently published scholarly manuscripts.

Articles from Vol. 61, No. 3, Spring

1998 Gerald D. Nash History Journal Prize Winners
The 1998 competition for the fourth annual Gerald D. Nash History Journal Prize was quite spirited and exceedingly close so far as the overall quality of the submissions was concerned. Fourteen journals were submitted, which necessitated a considerable...
Dupes and Demagogues: Caroline Krout's Narrative of Civil War Disloyalty
During the Civil War Hoosier Republicans believed that disloyalty to the Union was widespread among the Democrats of Indiana. The local scuffles between partisans, the formation of secret armed groups, and Democratic resistance to the draft seemed...
Governor James Monroe and Southampton Slave Resistance of 1799
James Monroe's governorship of Virginia (1799-1802) is best known for the violent suppression of "Gabriel's slave conspiracy" in 1800, in which freedom-seeking slaves from Henrico and neighboring counties plotted to burn the capital, Richmond, kill...
Hoover and the Indians: The Case for Continuity in Federal Indian Policy, 1900-1933
"The most dangerous animal in the United States" Herbert Hoover once observed, "is the man with an emotion and a desire to pass a new law." To Hoover, the formulation of government policy required careful examination of the facts and the calm, thoughtful...
Inteview with Michael J. Hogan
Born in Waterloo, Iowa, in 1943, Hogan received his bachelor's degree from the University of Northern Iowa, and his master's and doctoral degrees from the University of Iowa. Since 1986, he has been a professor of history at Ohio State University and...
Opposition to Internment: Defending Japanese American Rights during World War II
In 1943, Rev. Emery Andrews, a Baptist minister and former missionary to Japan, predicted about the treatment of Japanese Americans during World War II that "future historians will record this evacuation--this violation of citizenship rights--as one...
"Padre et Pastor Vostro": Girolamo Seripando and the Restoration of the Episcopate in Salerno
In 1545, in response to the crisis provoked by the recent Protestant Reformation, nearly 200 Roman Catholic church leaders gathered in Italy under Pope Paul III for what became known as the Council of Trent. The council lasted 18 years, with interruptions...
World War II Economic Warfare: The United States, Britain, and Portuguese Wolfram
The World War II alliance forged by Britain and the United States was one of the closest working relationships of the twentieth century, reflecting common interests and special ties of history and culture. This "special relationship" was cemented in...