The Historian

The Historian is a journal that publishes contemporary and relevant historical scholarship. The Historian also publishes extensive book reviews covering a wide array of recently published scholarly manuscripts.

Articles from Vol. 55, No. 1, Autumn

Coins for the Conflict: Nickel and the Axis, 1933-1945
As early as 1933 the Japanese and German governments minted nickel coins as a way of stockpiling a strategic raw material. Such an apparently innocuous use for nickel obviated the need to tie up capital in a conventional method of storage. In 1933...
Interview with Helen Nader
The interview with Helen Nader, an authority on medieval and Renaissance Spain, highlights her contributions to the Columbus Quincentennial. The interview also concerns her background, education, and career, as well as her views about the historical...
James Buchanan: Jacksonian Expansionist
James Buchanan had served in the House of Representatives from the Fourth Congressional District of Pennsylvania for five consecutive terms, from 1821 to 1831, when President Andrew Jackson appointed him minister to Russia. Smelling political exile,...
Media Bias in Coverage of the Dies Committee on Un-American Activities, 1938-1940
In the late 1930s the New Deal wrought great changes on the political landscape of the United States. To many Americans, these changes were frightening and difficult to understand. The sense of uncertainty and fear helped create an anti-New Deal backlash....
The Jews of Spain and the Expulsion of 1492
Spain was home to Jews longer than any other country, including even the Jewish homeland of ancient Palestine. Although it is not known when Jews first arrived in Spain, there is definite proof of significant Jewish settlement by at least 300 C.E....
The Myth of the Middle Ages
The Columbian Quincentenary is a good time to reflect on the origins and consequences of one of the most persistent myths in Western historiography: the Middle or Dark Ages. The popular view of the history of the West is that it is a drama in three...
U.S. Consuls in Zanzibar and the Slave Trade, 1870-1890
In the two decades before Britain and Germany carved up the East African sultanate of Zanzibar in 1890, U.S. representatives there occasionally spoke out against Zanzibar's slave trade, but did little to Stop it. In messages to Sultan Barghash bin...