History Review

This journal covers international historical events, people in power and those involved in social movements.

Articles from March

Appeasement: A New Series Profiles the Issues Raised by Key A-Level Questions: Robert Pearce Identifies the Points to Discuss. (Survival Skills)
Appeasement is one of the most controversial and hotly contested issues in modern history. The arguments for and against are so finely balanced that it is immensely difficult for hard-pressed students -- and academics -- to make up their minds. No...
Bismarck: Bruce Waller Looks at Recent Debate about Modern Germany's Greatest Statesman. (Talking Points)
Historians strive to accumulate and record the facts of the past: with diligence they can obtain a high degree of accuracy. They also attempt the more difficult task of interpreting that past; here certainty, if it is more than banal, is an ungrateful...
Britain and the Origins of the First World War: Christopher Ray Queries the Accepted Picture of a Reluctant Victim of Forces beyond Her Control. (the Unpredictable Past)
Accounts of the outbreak of World War One often communicate a sense that Britain was propelled into the conflict by force of circumstance, that it was, in some way, an accidental belligerent or a bystander `dragged' into war by forces beyond its control....
Elizabeth I: As the Second Elizabethan Age Closes in Disillusionment, Penry Williams Reconsiders Whether the First Deserved the Same Fate. (the Changing Picture)
Fifty-five years ago, at the time of the coronation of the present Queen, the British were encouraged to expect a second Elizabethan age. Three years earlier, J. E. Neale had told us of the splendours of the first, seen by the people of the time as...
Exeter University: Bruce Coleman, Admissions Tutor in History, Tells You What He Looks for and What You Can Gain from the Course. (University Challenge)
As the History syllabus at Exeter has just undergone major revision and as the Department (currently one of History & Archaeology) is involved in structural changes as part of a `schooling' of the University, this is an appropriate moment to reintroduce...
Fifty Years of Rewriting the French Revolution: John Dunne Signposts Main Landmarks and Current Directions in the Historiographical Debate. (the Unpredictable Past)
Each age, we are often told, rewrites the past in its own image. In the case of the French Revolution, this is an understatement. In the second half of this century the scholarship has seemed to be in a state of almost permanent revolution as historians...
History on the Net: Nick Henshall Welcomes Encyclopaedia Articles without Books or CD-ROMS
CD-ROMS were the flavour of 1995. Books, we were told, could not compete: redundancy was round the corner. Two years on it's come true, but teetering on the edge of ruin are many CD-ROM manufacturers, not the world's libraries. The same fate is predicted...
Life after Death? the Survival of the Church of England in the Seventeenth Century. (Talking Points)
John Morrill re-examines a stormy period of religious history Between 1643 and 1647 the Church of England was destroyed. Its system of government by `archbishops, bishops, deans, archdeacons etc.' (as a canon of 1640 expressed it) was scrapped;...
Poland-Lithuania Russia and Peter the Great: Robert Frost Reveals a Neglected Influence on His Reforms
In August 1698, on the way back from his famous embassy to western Europe, Peter I stopped off at Rawa Ruska in south-east Poland to meet Augustus II, elector of Saxony and the newly-elected king of Poland-Lithuania. Lubricated by four days of stupendously...
The Press: Jeremy Black Charts Its Growth in Victorian Britain. (New Agendas)
One of the many ways in which Victorian London was at the centre of British life and that of the British Empire was by the provision of news. Much of the news was of course made in London, but much was not; whichever was the case, it was London newspapers...
The University of Central England: Elliot Choueka Stresses the Advantages of a New University Successfully Establishing Its Credentials. (Student Perspective)
Birmingham: A city famous for Jasper Carrott, the Rotunda, the National Exhibition Centre and Aston Villa, oh and of course Spaghetti Junction! OK so on the surface Birmingham isn't the most alluring of places to visit, let alone to spend three years...
Victorian Crime: Clive Emsley Argues That Nineteenth-Century Perceptions Owed More to Media-Generated Panic Than to Criminal Realities. (New Agendas)
On the morning of Tuesday, 15 November 1892 Dr Thomas Neil Cream was executed in London's Newgate Prison. Cream was the kind of criminal who makes headlines and sells newspapers. He was a serial killer who had murdered seven women in England and North...