History Review

This journal covers international historical events, people in power and those involved in social movements.

Articles from No. 61, September

Dissolving the Dissolute? Henry VIII and the End of English Onasticism: R. E. Foster Puts the Dissolution of the Monasteries into Historical Context
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] The Monastic Scene Glastonbury, the Somerset town best known today for its Festival, once enjoyed far greater wealth and celebrity as a religious centre. In 1191, graves purporting to be those of King Arthur and Queen Guinevere...
Dr Goebbels: The Man Who Made Hitler? Robert Pearce Investigates the Career of the Third Reich's 'Evil Genius'
Dr Joseph Goebbels was probably the greatest propagandist of modern times. It is therefore apt that details about the life of someone who told so many lies and manipulated and distorted the truth so expertly are open to dispute. Even in otherwise excellent...
'Evil May Day': Re-Examining the Race Riot of 1517: Graham Noble Separates Fact from Tudor Propaganda
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] The First of May in Tudor England as a traditional public holiday, normally set aside for celebration and light-hearted revelry, but on that day in 1517 the City of London exploded into a destructive race riot that must have...
History at IB Level: Russel Tarr Introduces the New International Baccalaureate, Assessing Its Advantages and Disadvantages Compared with A Levels
From Autumn 2009 history teachers at International Baccalaureate level will be delivering a new syllabus. With IB becoming increasingly popular as an alternative to A-Level study, this is therefore a good time to review what exactly IB entails. ...
Hollywood Blockbusters and Historical Reality: Michael Morrogh Sees Value in Historical Films, despite Their Evident Imperfections
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] Elizabethan Errors A recent film, Elizabeth: The Golden Age (2007), has been called a travesty of history by a number of historians. They point out its unrealistic setting, in that much of the film appears within a cathedral...
James I and the Puritans: John Spiller Assesses James I's Impact on the Puritans and the Puritans' Impact on James I
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] The Self-Styled 'Godly' The Puritans embraced a range of views on religion, society and the role of monarchy. There were especially important differences among them relating to how the state church should be governed, and...
Lloyd George and the Generals: Richard Wilkinson Recreates the Contest That Marked, and Marred, the British War Effort in 1914-18
Sometimes the camera gets it right--the Russian soldier implanting the Red Flag on the Reich Chancellery, the man-on-the-dole at the Wigan street-corner, Monroe coyly controlling her skirt in The Seven Year Itch. As perceptive as any was the photo...
Making Sense of 19th Century Nationalism: F.G. Stapleton Introduces the 'Weather Vane Ideology'
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] Nationalism is a political force which has been shaping the history of Europe and the world over the last two centuries more than the ideas of freedom and parliamentary democracy, let alone communism.' Most historians would...
Pitt the Elder: Graham Goodlad Reviews the Controversial Career of William Pitt the Elder, Whose Ascendancy Coincided with Britain's Involvement in the Seven Years' War
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] The year 2008 marks the Booth anniversary of the birth of William Pitt the Elder. In recent years his memory has been overshadowed by that of his son and namesake, who led Britain during the French Revolutionary Wars. Pitt...
Turning Points in the Vietnam War: Viv Sanders Takes Issue with Some All Too Common Assumptions
There are two major issues concerning turning points in the United States' involvement in the Vietnam War, both involving chronology. First, when and how did the US become irrevocably committed to large-scale intervention? Second, when did it become...
'U-Turn If You Want to ...': Mark Rathbone Analyses the Causes and Consequences of Sudden Changes of Policy in Nineteenth-Century British Politics
'U-turn if you want to. The lady's not for turning,' Margaret Thatcher told the Conservative Party Conference in 1980, chiding faint-hearts in her own party and justifying pressing on with monetarist economic policies despite a steep rise in unemployment....