Monthly Labor Review

A monthly publication of the Bureau of Labor Statistics that contains analytical articles on employment and unemployment, prices, compensation, working conditions, productivity, and other topics. Includes tables of current labor statistics, book reviews,

Articles from Vol. 127, No. 9, September

Accounting for Wages and Benefits Using the ECI
Using the data set behind the Employer Cost Index to impute benefit values on the National Longitudinal Study of Youth and the Current Population Survey, this study finds that workers at the bottom part of the wage distribution exhibit a much stronger...
A Visual Essay: Post-Recession Trends in Nonfarm Employment and Related Economic Indicators
The economy entered a recovery in November 2001 following an 8-month recession, but the labormarket recovery began much later. Gross domestic product (GDP) and corporate profits had surged before payroll employment reached its August 2003 trough. Employment...
Current Labor Statistics
Notes on labor statistics 60 Comparative indicators 1. Labor market indicators 73 2. Annual and quarterly percent changes in compensation, prices, and productivity ...
Declining Union Density in Mexico, 1984-2000
Since the mid-1980s, Mexico has witnessed a significant decline in unionization; changing industry, occupation, and demographic worker characteristics account for only about one-fourth of the decline, while structural and institutional changes account...
Employment in the Information Sector in March 2004
Employment in the information sector stood at 3,158,000 in the United States in March 2004, 1.7 percent less than the year before. (1) Nationwide, 56,000 jobs were lost over this 12-month period, continuing a trend of over-the-year declines that began...
Goods Output versus Manufacturing Production
"A curious phenomenon of the 2001 recession was the sharp divergence between two arguably similar economic indicators," opens Charles Steindel in Current Issues in Economics and Finance from the New York Federal Reserve Bank. He goes on to analyze...
Self-Employment around the World
In countries around the world, many people think that owning one's own business is a more desirable form of employment than working for others. A recent study by Dartmouth economist David G. Blanchflower, however, argues that self-employment may not...
The Diurnal Pattern of On-the-Job Injuries
Data from two sources indicate that the injury hazard is substantially higher late at night than during regular daytime work hours; the best explanation for this finding is that work at night is dangerous, even adjusting for broad industry-occupation...
The September Review
Our lead article welcomes back an annual review of international prices for imports and exports to the United States. Melissa E. Schwartz finds that import price increases abated in 2003 compared with 2002, while the rate of increase in export prices...
U.S. Import and Export Prices in 2003: Prices for Imports and Exports Rose during 2003, with Price Increases for Petroleum and Petroleum Products Leading Import Prices; the Overall Export Price Index Posted Its Largest Gain since 1995
In 2003, overall U.S. import and export prices increased for the second consecutive year. (1) Prices for imports rose 2.4 percent, following a 4.2-percent rise in 2002, while export prices gained 2.2 percent, up from a 1.0-percent rise in 2002. During...