African American Review

Founded in 1967, the African American Review is a quarterly journal published by St. Louis University, located in St. Louis, Mo. Its subject matter is literature and black publications. Its managing editor is Aileen Keenan.

Articles from Vol. 35, No. 3, Fall

African/American: Lorraine Hansberry's Les Blancs and the American Civil Rights Movement
Many scholars, including Margaret B. Wilkerson, note that Lorraine Hansberry was the first African-American playwright to explore, in her final work, Les Blancs, the African quest for freedom from European colonialists. Hansberry studied African history...
Moses and the Egyptian: Religious Authority in Olaudah Equiano's Interesting Narrative
From the first image that greeted readers of his book, Olaudah Equlano presented the self of his 1789 autobiographical narrative as a pious Christian, one whose religious conversion meant a kind of freedom as significant as his manumission from...
Not Black And/or White: Reading Racial Difference in Heliodorus's Ethiopica and Pauline Hopkins's of One Blood
In the ancient Greek novel Ethiopica, written by Heliodorus sometime in the fourth century A.D., a portrait of the mythical Andromeda figures prominently: When the Ethiopian princess Charicleia is born resembling the white-skinned Andromeda of the...
Picturing the Mother, Claiming Egypt: My Bondage and My Freedom as Auto(bio)ethnography
As many scholars of historical anthropology have noted, in taxonomizing difference, "American School" ethnographers (ca. 1820-1870) were drawing and policing the borders of euramerican racial identity and insinuating prescriptive markers for that euramerican...
Slouching toward Beastliness: Richard Wright's Anatomy of Thomas Dixon
Like Nemesis of Greek tragedy," writes W. E. B. Du Bois L in Black Reconstruction, "the central problem of America after the Civil War, as before, was the black man" (237). U.S. literature has both tried to resolve this problem and contributed to it....
"So Strangely Interwoven": The Property of Inheritance, Race, and Sexual Morality in Pauline E. Hopkins's Contending Forces
Representing middle-class, "moral" African Americans in Contending Forces: A Romance Illustrative of Negro Life North and South (1900), Pauline E. Hopkins challenged mainstream race discourses that maintained Jim Crow's social and political inequalities....
The Shaman's Apprentice: Ecstasy and Economy in Wilson's Joe Turner
In his book August Wilson and the African American Odyssey, Kim Pereira briefly engages the theories of the renowned anthropologist Mircea Eliade in order to understand the events and characters of Wilson's play Joe Turner's Come and Gone (82-83)....
"Under the Umbrella of Black Civilization": A Conversation with Reginald McKnight
Talking to Reginald McKnight is like scanning an imaginary worldwide radio dial. At any given moment he can transform his pleasant speaking voice into a raspy, aged, Middle Eastern-by-way-of-New York accent--or a deep Southern drawl. In an instant...
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