African American Review

Founded in 1967, the African American Review is a quarterly journal published by St. Louis University, located in St. Louis, Mo. Its subject matter is literature and black publications. Its managing editor is Aileen Keenan.

Articles from Vol. 34, No. 1, Spring

An Interview with Edward P. Jones
Edward P. Jones is the author of Lost in the City, a collection of fourteen short stories which was nominated for the National Book Award in 1992. In the fall of 1997, Jones answered my questions after meeting with a Howard University African American...
Embodying Cultural Memory in Paule Marshall's Praisesong for the Widow
As an epigraph to the section entitled "Lave Tete," the third section of her novel Praisesong for the Widow, Paule Marshall uses a brief quotation from a poem by Randall Jarrell: "Oh, Bars of my [ldots] body, open, open!" (148). It is in this section...
No Accident: From Black Power to Black Box Office
It's no accident that people like Malcolm X and Martin Luther King were destroyed at those moments of their political careers when [ldots] they replaced nationalism with a critique of imperialism. (hooks 37) The years between Malcolm X as the scariest...
Raising Voices, Lifting Shadows: Competing Voice-Paradigms in Frances E. W. Harper's Iola Leroy
One of the most interesting and frequently overlooked features of Frances E.W. Harper's 1892 novel Iola Leroy, or Shadows Uplifted is its dual climaxes. The first climax is the rural church meeting in Chapter XX that brings together Iola, Robert, and...
Reading the Scars: Rita Dove's the Darker Face of the Earth
Writer as Reader Rita Dove's The Darker Face of the Earth is a recounting of the Oedipus drama, framed in terms of the African-American experience of slavery. It is a poet's reading of Oedipus the King, resonating with the beauty and richness of...
The Story Must Go on and On: The Fantastic, Narration, and Intertextuality in Toni Morrison's Beloved and Jazz
A fixed law, an established rule: that is what immobilizes narrative. (Todorov 165) Rereading [is] an operation contrary to the commercial and ideological habits of our society, which would have us "throw away" the story once it has been consumed...
The Worm against the Word: The Hermeneutical Challenge in Hurston's Jonah's Gourd Vine
Daughter of a Baptist preacher, Zora Neale Hurston spoke from the pulpit every time that she wrote. She did not follow the conventional path of testifying to her father's faith. Although she enjoyed her parent's rhapsodic language at revival meetings,...
Unmasking the Genteel Performer: Elizabeth Keckley's Behind the Scenes and the Politics of Public Wrath
When Elizabeth Keckley wrote her 1868 autobiography Behind the Scenes; or, Thirty Years a Slave, and Four Years in the White House, one of her primary goals was to defend herself and Mary Todd Lincoln from public ridicule. Because Keckley had "been...
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