African American Review

Founded in 1967, the African American Review is a quarterly journal published by St. Louis University, located in St. Louis, Mo. Its subject matter is literature and black publications. Its managing editor is Aileen Keenan.

Articles from Vol. 35, No. 2, Summer

A Conversation with Kevin Willmott
Kevin Willmott is, by necessity, a person of many talents. As an independent filmmaker on a small (sometimes approaching nonexistent) budget, he must be, by turns, screenwriter, actor, producer, director, impresario, and salesperson to keep his projects...
"A Gentleman of Superior Cultivation and Refinement": Recovering the Biography of Frank J. Webb
The 1997 reissue of Frank J. Webb's 1857 novel of free Black life in antebellum Philadelphia, The Garies and Their Friends, may finally lead to the consideration--both in our scholarship and our classrooms--that the book and its author rightly deserve....
Passed Over: The Tragic Mulatta and (Dis)Integration of Identity in Adrienne Kennedy's Plays
Much recent interest in the drama of Adrienne Kennedy has been spawned by the publication of her innovative autobiography People Who Led to My Plays (1987), the 1992 Great Lakes festival devoted to her work, and the recent productions of her plays...
The One All-Black Town Worth the Pain: (African) American Exceptionalism, Historical Narration, and the Critique of Nationhood in Toni Morrison's Paradise
In her most recent novel, Paradise (1998), Toni Morrison offers us the story of a small western African American community, Ruby, whose contemporary members understand themselves in relation to an historical narrative of ancestral perseverance, idealism,...
Toni Morrison and the Burden of the Passing Narrative
Passing for white, a phenomenon that once captivated writers as diverse as Charles Chesnutt, Sinclair Lewis, Nella Larsen, and Mark Twain, no longer seems to engage contemporary novelists. The long list of authors from the first half of the twentieth...
Toni Morrison, Oprah Winfrey, and Postmodern Popular Audiences
Throughout the twentieth century, African-American writers have faced what James Weldon Johnson called "a special John Young problem which the plain American author knows nothing Pr about-the problem of the double audience" (247). The mainstream, or...
Toni Morrison's Jazz and the City
Out of the three volumes of Toni Morrison's trilogy starting with Beloved (1987) and ending with Paradise (1997), Jazz (1992) may very well be the most vocal. The narrative's deliberately ungendered, unspecific voice and its avatars take center stage...
Which Way to the Promised Land?: Spike Lee's Clockers and the Legacy of the African American City
Nothing is experienced by itself, but always in relation to its surroundings, the sequences of events leading up to it, the memory of past experiences.... Every citizen has had long associations with some part of his city, and his image is soaked in...

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