African American Review

Founded in 1967, the African American Review is a quarterly journal published by St. Louis University, located in St. Louis, Mo. Its subject matter is literature and black publications. Its managing editor is Aileen Keenan.

Articles from Vol. 37, No. 4, Winter

Black Thunder's Call for a Conjure Response to American Negro Slavery
In American classrooms in the first half of the twentieth century, students using the popular history textbook Growth of the American Republic were taught that slaves "suffered less than any other class in the South from its 'peculiar institution.'...
Dead Letter Office: Conspiracy, Trauma, and Song of Solomon's Posthumous Communication
3 P.M. Song of Solomon picks up where Mumbo Jumbo leaves off. That is, in repeating with a difference certain details and motifs of Ishmael Reed's 1972 novel, Toni Morrison signifies upon what Henry Louis Gates, Jr., has called one of "the grand...
From Seeking One's Voice to Uttering the Scream: The Pioneering Journey of African American Women Playwrights through the 1960s and 1970s
No Black woman even like nowadays tells you things you're familiar with, like Black women have problems. In a family situation, I'm talking about a classic, if you understand what I'm saying, a classic Black woman figure. Showing her not just surviving,...
"He Made Us Laugh Some": Frederick Douglass's Humor
Among Frederick Douglass's formidable skills critic of slavery and racial prejudice, he was widely remembered during the nineteenth century for being able to make his audiences laugh. Toward the end of Douglass's final autobiography, The Life and Times,...
In a Different Chord: Interpreting the Relations among Black Female Sexuality, Agency, and the Blues
Sometimes the lyrics mock and signify even as they pretend to weep. (Albert Murray, Stomping the Blues) Black feminism is not a monolithic enterprise. But it starts to look that way in critical treatment of the intercourse among the blues, black...
"I Will Gladly Share with Them My Richer Heritage": Schoolteachers in Frances E. W. Harper's Iola Leroy and Charles Chesnutt's Mandy Oxendine
Through the figure of the black schoolteacher, Frances E. W. Harper's Iola Leroy, published in 1892, and Charles Chesnutt's novel Mandy Oxendine, unpublished during his life-time but believed to have been written between 1893 and 1896, (1) both reflect...
Rumors of Grace: White Masculinity in Pauline Hopkins's Contending Forces
Through the simple expedient of demonizing and reifying the range of colors on a palette, American Africanism makes it possible to say and not say, to inscribe and erase, to escape and engage, to act out and act on, to historicize and render timeless....
Something Other Than a Family Quarrel: The Beautiful Boys in Morrison's Sula
Toni Morrison's second novel, praised for its celebration of girls' friendships, is dedicated to boys. The writer inscribes Sula to her young sons, whom she "miss[es] although they have not left [her]." By deliberately creating a vacuum with, and then...
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