African American Review

Founded in 1967, the African American Review is a quarterly journal published by St. Louis University, located in St. Louis, Mo. Its subject matter is literature and black publications. Its managing editor is Aileen Keenan.

Articles from Vol. 27, No. 2, Summer

"'... Ah Said Ah'd Save De Text for You'": Recontextualizing the Sermon to Tell (Her)story in Zora Neale Hurston's 'Their Eyes Were Watching God.' (Black South Fiction, Art, Culture)
Zora Neale Hurston writes in Their Eyes Were Watching God (1973) from the interiority of black culture. The fact that she sees religion as a mode of making sense of the experiences of a black tradition makes Their Eyes Were Watching God a strong assertive...
Albert Murray: Literary Reconstruction of the Vernacular Community
Albert Murray may well be African America's undiscovered national treasure, for in his works he provides a fresh reappraisal of African American culture that is at once instructive, thought provoking, witty, and unapologetic. In the three decades since...
Alice Walker's Vision of the South in 'The Third Life of Grange Copeland.' (Black South Fiction, Art, Culture)
In "The Black Writer and the Southern Experience," Alice Walker defines her response to an South in a richly ambivalent way.(1) Although she stresses that she does not intend to "romanticize Southern black country life" and is quick to point out that...
Black South Literature: Before Day Annotations (for Blyden Jackson)
Spike Lee prefaced She's Gotta Have It with the famous opening of Zora Neale Hurston's Their Eyes Were Watching God (1937), a fitting gesture of honoring his ancestors while projecting for his audience a gendered joke about the Black South rage to...
Bontemps and the Old South
Arna Wendell Bontemps (1902-1973) had a longer, more prolific career in humane letters than did most of the young writers who developed alongside him during the Harlem Renaissance. And the Old South is more prominent in his works than in those of any...
"Da-Da!" (Short Story) (Black South Fiction, Art, Culture)
Malcolm let his thoughts return to Paulie. And he found that he had already made a decision about what to do with his memory of the boy. He would not let himself forget about Paulie. He needed to remember. He would write about Paulie. If writing was,...
Enriching the Paper Trail: An Interview with Tom Dent
Founded by SNCC (Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee) workers, the Free Southern Theatre started as a cultural wing of the Civil Rights Movement, it would become the single greatest cultural influence on African American dramatic and literary...
Fire-Casting an Eternal De-Fascination with Death: Writing about the South, and the Responsible Necessity of Reading and Knowing Black South Writing in the Quest for Afrikan World Salvation and Restitution
The Disdain of Duality This discussion cannot be advanced without an initial and immediate declaration of both affirmation and disdain. My sole reason for contributing to this journal at this time is because my Brother, Jerry W. Ward, Jr., asked...
"'His Feet on Your Neck'": The New Religion in the Works of Ernest J. Gaines
Central to the work of Ernest J. Gaines is the question of the place of religion in the lives of black people attempting to attain freedom. Although he rarely addresses religion explicitly, religion becomes a means through which Gaine's characters...
Mississippi Red
Well you asked me, so I'll tell you. I'm a hustler. Nothing big-time or anything like that, just an ordinary colored fellow doing the best I can with the best I've got. And, that's all I got to say about that. My daddy was a bail bondsman in Jackson,...
Rebellious Energy
It was hot. The heat had transformed the atmosphere from the inconspicuous gaseous matter we recognize as air into something thicker and more tangible. This was the kind of heat that had personality and it was bold. Intent on making its presence felt,...
Scotch and Curry
Wandalyn wears glances like a shawl. And if in the beer and smoke of this place a pair of eyes should slip from her neck and off her shoulders and away from her, she gathers it back, if she wishes, and puts it in place. Hers is a beauty which, even...
Snail
Perched atop the pine stump just off the curve of Duels Road, Renaldo swallowed a bellyful of breath to roar out over the din of the screaming school children, "THE BUS! THE BUS! YOU DON'T WAIT FOR IT - IT WON'T WAIT FOR YOU! With this, Aunt Hagar's...
The Fusion of Ideas: An Interview with Margaret Walker Alexander
Margaret Walker is the prize-winning author of For My People, the first collection by an African American writer to win a national award. Published by Yale University in 1942, the volume celebrated its fifty-year anniversary as Walker herself turned...
The Necessity of Blacks' Writing Fiction about the South
It is, I strongly feel, important for blacks to write fiction about the South. I say fiction because practically all of the books I've seen written about the South by blacks have been nonfiction, mostly black history. I am a history buff, so I know...
Visual Jazz - an Interview with and Portfolio of Paintings by John Scott
John Scott was born in New Orleans, Louisiana, on June 30, 1940. He has a B.A. from Xavier University and an M.F.A. from Michigan State University, along with an Honorary Doctor of Huminities from Madonna College in Michigan. Since 1965 he has been...
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