African American Review

Founded in 1967, the African American Review is a quarterly journal published by St. Louis University, located in St. Louis, Mo. Its subject matter is literature and black publications. Its managing editor is Aileen Keenan.

Articles from Vol. 29, No. 1, Spring

Authority, Multivocality, and the New World Order in Gloria Naylor's 'Bailey's Cafe.'
Bailey's Cafe, Gloria Naylor's latest and most ambitious novel to date, is a hauntingly lyrical text steeped in biblical allusion. With this fourth novel, which completes a series including The Women of Brewster Place, Linden Hills, and Mama Day, Naylor...
"Leavin' a Mark on the Wor(l)d": Marksmen and Marked Men in 'Middle Passage.'
The point is not that acts of racial violence are only words but rather that they have to have a word. . . . racism always betrays the perversion of a man, the "talking animal." . . . A system of marks, it outlines space in order to assign forced residence...
Race and Domesticity in 'The Color Purple.'
An important juncture in Alice Walker's The Color Purple is reached when Celie first recovers the missing letters from her long-lost sister Nettie. This discovery not only signals the introduction of a new narrator to this epistolary novel but also begins...
Repositioning: Center and Margin in Julie Dash's 'Daughters of the Dust.'
One of the first scenes in Julie Dash's Daughters of the Dust shows a woman looking through a kaleidoscope given to her by Mr. Snead, a photographer. As Snead explains the way the instrument works, she delights in the changing images. The kaleidoscope...
Should Their Eyes Have Been Watching God? Hurston's Use of Religious Experience and Gothic Horror
The title of a literary work may be leading or misleading, but it is often a good place to start an analysis. When title words or phrases are repeated inside the text, connecting them to the specific place where they appear seems to offer the promise...
The African American Historian: David Bradley's 'The Chaneysville Incident.'
. . . for a black person, history is a challenge because a black person is supposed not to have any history except the colonial one. We hardly know what happened to our people before the time when they met the Europeans who decided to give them what...
The Fence
Again? Seems like we were just out there. To Deacon's house. Why do we have to go every year? Why do we have to go at all is what I want to know, all the way out in the Boondocks . . . to the big-deal sub-urbs. So he's got a house. Big deal. My mother...
"The Only Voice Is Your Own": Gloria Naylor's Revision of 'The Tempest.'
In Gloria Naylor's novel Mama Day, Reema's boy comes from the university to conduct anthropological studies in Willow Springs, the novel's mysterious setting. Attempting to preserve "cultural identities" against "hostile social and political parameters,"...
Traces of Derrida in Toni Morrison's 'Jazz.'
Toni Morrison's published work is infused with postmodern themes. For example, Sula is structured around the inter-play between supposed binary oppositions (such as Bottom/valley, white/black, male/female), and Beloved examines the necessary dangers...
Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.