African American Review

Founded in 1967, the African American Review is a quarterly journal published by St. Louis University, located in St. Louis, Mo. Its subject matter is literature and black publications. Its managing editor is Aileen Keenan.

Articles from Vol. 41, No. 3, Fall

"And Bid Him Translate: Langston Hughes's Translations of Poetry from French," by Alfred Guillaume
Translation, in recent years, seems to have suffered a decline in its reputation within scholarly debates. Once revered as a mark of high intellect and transcultural communication, it is now being considered in light of its broader, far more negative...
Bourgeois Blackness and Autobiographical Authenticity in Ellen Tarry's the Third Door
In the past 10 years, "authenticity" has become a watchword in critical race theory, influenced not only by organic developments within the field, but also by convergences among African American studies and ongoing work in areas as diverse as postmodern...
Exodus and Colonization: Charting the Journey in the Journals of Daniel Coker, a Descendant of Africa
At Sea, Feb. 24, Thursday May He that was with Moses in the wilderness, be with us; then all will be well. --Daniel Coker, The Journal of Daniel Coker, a descendant of Africa On January 31, 1820, hundreds of well-wishers packed the African Church...
Harlem Is Burning: Urban Rioting and the "Black Underclass" in Chester Himes's Blind Man with a Pistol
Blind Man with a Pistol (1969)--the final installment in a series of detective novels Chester Himes began publishing in 1957 with For Love of Imabelle--opens with a view of one of the darkest houses in American literature, one that updates Poe's phantasmagoric,...
Object Written, Written Object: Slavery, Scarring, and Complications of Authorship in Beloved
In the vast wealth of criticism on Toni Morrison's Beloved--and there is an astounding amount of criticism on Beloved given that the novel is still less than 20 years old--many scholars rightfully and fruitfully devote extensive analysis to Morrison's...
Richard Wright's 12 Million Black Voices and World War II-Era Civic Nationalism
Speaking at the Fourth American Writer's Conference in June 1941, Richard Wright denounces the hypocrisy of America's defense of liberty in Europe. His speech, "What We Think of Their War," refers to Franklin Delano Roosevelt's "Four Freedoms" as a...
"Simply a Menaced Boy": Analogizing Color, Undoing Dominance in James Baldwin's Giovanni's Room
The year 2007 marks the twentieth anniversary of the death of novelist, essayist, political spokesperson, philosopher James Baldwin. The significance of Baldwin's contribution to 20th-century American letters and politics cannot be overstated. It was...
"The Uses and Hazards of Expatriation": Richard Wright's Cosmopolitanism in Process
"I'm a rootless man," Richard Wright declares boldly in White Man Listen! (1957), "but I m neither psychologically distraught nor in any wise particularly perturbed because of it" (xxix). In this and in many other statements, Wright claims for himself,...
"We, Too, Rise with You": Recovering Langston Hughes's African (Re)Turn 1954-1960 in an African Treasury, the Chicago Defender, and Black Orpheus
Oh, Congo brother With your tribal marks, We, too, emerge From ageless darks. We, too, emit A frightening cry From body scarred, Soul that won't die. We encarnadine the sky.--Langston Hughes, "We, Too" 11. 1-9 In spite of...
William Wells Brown's Narrative & Traveling Subjectivity
William Wells Brown took rather unconventional first step in The Narrative of William W. Brown, A Fugitive Slave (1847-48), the first publication of his long and successful literary career. The text bears many of the marks of 19th-century slave narratives'...

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