African American Review

Founded in 1967, the African American Review is a quarterly journal published by St. Louis University, located in St. Louis, Mo. Its subject matter is literature and black publications. Its managing editor is Aileen Keenan.

Articles from Vol. 40, No. 4, Winter

African American Women's Poetry in the Christian Recorder, 1855-1865: A Bio-Bibliography with Sample Poems
While the work of several early African American women poets who published book-length collections has been recovered by literary historians (Joan Sherman pre-eminent among them), many pre-20th-century Black women who published occasional poetry in...
A Tale of Disunion: The Racial Politics of Unclaimed Kindred in Julia C. Collins's the Curse of Caste; or the Slave Bride
A reader familiar with 19th-century African American fiction might turn the last page of Julia C. Collins's The Curse of Caste; or The Slave Bride in disappointment because the novel does not satisfy expectations that initiated readers bring to antebellum...
Biracial Promise and the New South in Minnie's Sacrifice: A Protocol for Reading the Curse of Caste; or the Slave Bride
Frances E. W. Harper, like Julia C. Collins, serialized a novel in the late 1860s in the Christian Recorder, the newspaper published by the African Methodist Episcopal Church. Besides its publishing history, Harper's Minnie's Sacrifice has a number...
Childhood, the Body, and Race Performance: Early 20th-Century Etiquette Books for Black Children
When the activist, educator, and clubwoman Mary Church Terrell discussed The Modern Woman in a 1916 lecture in Charleston, her decorous physical persona impressed her audience as much as did her ideas about the role of women to racial service. (1)...
Face Value: Ambivalent Citizenship in Iola Leroy
From the moment of its initial publication in 1892, Frances E. W. Harper's Iola Leroy, or Shadows Uplifted has experienced a decidedly ambiguous critical reception. In William Still's introduction to the second edition of the novel, for example, the...
Foreword
The recent publication of The Curse of Caste; or The Slave Bride in book form for the first time challenges all who are interested in 19th-century African American literary history to take a fresh look at the story of black women's writing that we've...
How Do You Solve a Problem like Theresa?
Freedom's Journal is well known as the "first newspaper published by African Americans." Words written in the first issue are often quoted and generally used to define its scope and purpose: "We wish to plead our own cause. Too long have others spoken...
Information Wanted: The Curse of Caste, Minnie's Sacrifice, and the Christian Recorder
I the "Dedicatory Lines" he wrote for the Christian Recorder's inaugural 1852 issue, editor Reverend Daniel Payne apostrophized: Whate'er thine eyes behold, note down-- The beautiful in nature, or the grand, The curious or sublime.... ...
Interrogating the Silences: Julia C. Collins, 19th-Century Black Readers and Writers, and the Christian Recorder
In the 1970s, when Tillie Olsen published Silences, her rumination on literary exclusions, she dedicated her book in part to "our silenced people, century after century of their beings consumed in the hard, everyday essential work of maintaining human...
Introduction: Reclaiming Julia C. Collins, Forgotten 19th-Century African American Author
In April 1864, Julia C. Collins emerged out of anonymity in the small town of Williamsport, Pennsylvania, into the literary spotlight. Collins presented herself to readers nationwide, captured them with several didactic essays and a domestic novel,...
"Neither Is Memory Always Thus Avenging": Longing for Kinship in Julia C. Collins's the Curse of Caste and the Christian Recorder
"It is a serial story which we are all reading, and which grows in vital interest with each successive installment."--Charles W. Chesnutt, The Marrow of Tradition (1901) Black American writers invested the story of slavery with a deep imaginative...
Of Print and Primogeniture, or, the Curse of Firsts
When asked if I would share few thoughts on Julia C. Collins's The Curse of Caste, both about the novel itself and the recent spate of commentary on said book, I agreed without much hesitation. As a scholar of 19th-century black literature, I see my...
"'Ruse It Well": Reading, Power, and the Seduction Plot in the Curse of Caste
Readers of fiction in the United States during the 1860s immediately would have recognized the narrative conventions that Julia C. Collins uses to unfold the "dark mystery" (14) of her novel--the story of the ultimately tragic courtship and marriage...
The Christian Recorder, Broken Families, and Educated Nations in Julia C. Collins's Civil War Novel the Curse of Caste
"We know that there are many well-educated, strong and powerful minds among us, that have need only to be discovered ...."--The Christian Recorder (1852) "Family metaphors abound in Civil War literature."--Catherine Clinton In April, 1864, at...
The Sentiment of the Christian Serial Novel: The Curse of Caste; or the Slave Bride and the AME Christian Recorder
By the time the first installment of Julia C. Collins's The Curse of Caste; or The Slave Bride was printed in the Christian Recorder, a 19th-century African American church-affiliated newspaper, Collins had become a household name among its readers,...
What the Dickens?: Intertextual Influence and the Inheritance of Virtue in Julia C. Collins's the Curse of Caste; or the Slave Bride
Curses echo through the halls of ancestral homes, their sound amplified by the memory of an avenging spirit. Characters draped in darkness and shadow live secluded from the truth about their family history, their only evidence of ancestry carefully...