American Review of Canadian Studies

A quarterly publication presenting original research on topics relating to Canada and the humanities and social sciences. This is the official journal of the Association for Canadian Studies in the United States. Academic interest.

Articles from Vol. 29, No. 1, Spring

Editorial: A Scholar's Life Lived: Arnold E. "Ted" Davidson
Fittingly, I first met Ted Davidson at an ACSUS Biennial, the 1977 meeting in Burlington, Vermont. I was a second-year Ph.D. student at the University of Manitoba, it was my first academic paper, I had never been to an academic conference before, I...
From Fathers to Sun: Northrop Frye and the History of English-Canadian Poetry
When John Ayre's biography of Northrop Frye was published in 1989, its dustjacket suggested that Frye ought to be considered the foremost figure in Canadian intellectual history. He "has authored," it proclaimed, "three of the most influential books...
Louis Riel and the United States
Among the ironies of Canadian history is the fact that the most prominent individual ever executed for treason against the Canadian state--Louis Riel--was at the time of his execution an American citizen. Riel's relationship with the United States...
Margaret Atwood, Carol Shields, and "That Moodie Bitch"
Susanna Moodie, Victorian gentlewoman, unwilling emigrant to the Ontario backwoods and author of Roughing It in the Bush (1832), has long been established in the canon of Canadian literature. Her status owes much to the efforts of a number of critics,...
Noble Canadians, Ugly Americans: Anti-Americanism and the Canadian Ideal in British Readings of Canadian Literature
For some years now Canadian literature has been generating immense attention on the international stage. This has been no less true in Great Britain, the erstwhile imperial center, where Canada has been the long-time subject of British fascination....
Postcolonial Guilt in Margaret Atwood's Surfacing
Think of being the parent or the child of a concentration camp guard. One would want to say: `This person is not my own,' and yet one could not. The facts of birth are inescapable. So are the very facts of belonging to the civilisation that has made...
Pre- and Post-Mortem: Regendering and Serial Killing in (Helene) Rioux, (Anne) Dandurand, (Claire) De, and (Margaret) Atwood
When Northrop Frye wrote his now-famous concluding essay for the 1965 Literary History of Canada, he argued that Canadians historically have had significant respect for law and order in the face of mammoth, threatening, and sometimes monstrous wilderness...
Reading Together and Apart: Feminism And/versus Ethnicity in Margaret Laurence and Margaret Atwood: A Conversation
What happens when three feminist literary critics, accustomed to reading and writing separately, get together to work through a difference of opinion? Several times a semester, we met for brown-bag lunches in Veronica's office and, as is inevitable...
Review Essay: (Margaret) Atwood's Toronto: Arnold E. Davidson: Seeing in the Dark: Margaret Atwood's Cat's Eye
Arnold E. Davidson, Seeing in the Dark: Margaret Atwood's "Cat's Eye." Toronto: ECW Press, 1997. I am delighted to have this opportunity to reflect here on Seeing in the Dark, an ECW monograph by Ted Davidson on Margaret Atwood's Cat's Eye. It provides...
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