Insight on the News

Insight on the newspaper is a magazine specializing in General topics.

Articles from Vol. 17, No. 42, November 12

A Letter from the Editor
Dear Readers, To say we were white-hot angry about something the other day is a gross understatement when describing an incident in our editorial offices. Some nut case sent us about 24 brown envelopes, each addressed to a different editorial employee....
All Aboard: Boarding Schools Are Trying to Broaden Their Base and Diversify Their Student Bodies
Most people don't know much about boarding schools, says Craig Thorn, who has taught English for 20 years at Phillips Academy in Andover, Mass., alma mater of President George W. Bush and his father. "A lot of people in our generation think of English...
A Secure Future: The Physical-Security Industry Is a 830 Billion Market, and If One Company's Recent Experience Is Any Indication, That Figure Could Increase Significantly under a New Federal Contract
The federal government long has seen the value of the bullet-resistant glass made by CompuDyne Corp. As part of a larger $3.5 billion initiative to rebuild and strengthen existing buildings, CompuDyne is installing bullet-resistant glass and attack-resistant...
A Shift in Thinking about Medicine
Thomas Kuhn, the renowned physicist and philosopher radically altered the way we think about scientific evolution. Kuhn argued that scientific thought advanced through "intellectually violent revolutions," which he termed "paradigm shifts." These shifts...
A Somber Sell. (Business)
An industry known for its brassy attitude, tongue-in-cheek humor and bold moves has toned down in the wake of the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks on New York City and the Pentagon. "Most clients want to stay away from the issue," says Matt Smith, executive...
Budget Sacrifices Required to Fund War on Terror. (Waste & Abuse)
Spending fever swept through Washington in the aftermath of Sept. 11 as bureaucrats, industry lobbyists, interest groups and opportunistic politicians scrambled to game the crisis for advantage or gain. But one man -- White House Budget Director Mitch...
Bush Casts off Doubts about His Leadership. (Political Notebook)
The doubts have receded, the poll ratings are sky-high and George W. Bush is fitting more comfortably into the presidency. The surprised glance at the corner of the room, the goofy grin and the deer-in-the-headlights gaze of his early days in Washington...
Clintons May Have Tried to Kill Olson's Book
Bill and Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton (D-N.Y.) "put their PR spin machine into high gear" following the death of author Barbara Olson in an effort to halt publication of her forthcoming Final Days book, according to a report on NewsMax.com. Olson, the...
Congressional Staffers Have Nowhere to Work from. (News Alert!)
On Oct. 17 congressional cheers could be heard over the announcement by House Speaker Denny Hastert of Illinois that the lower chamber would be closed pending further investigation into potential anthrax threats. Since congressmen are in the habit...
G'bye Gas: They Soon May Zip by You as You Sit in Your Sport-Utility Vehicle Stuck in a Traffic Jam. and Battery-Run Cars Will Make Parking Easy, Too
The Sparrow, manufactured by Corbin Motors in Hollister, Calif., is ideal for crammed downtowns. Designed for the lone commuter -- it has only one seat -- four of them can squeeze into one parking spot. "This vehicle makes sense for city use," says...
Help from Abroad: Stay-Home Mothers Who Need a Little Help around the House Might Consider Hiring Au Pairs, Who Today Are Better Screened and More Carefully Trained Than in the Past. (Life)
Scott and Laura Gerke, working parents from Vienna, Va., started adding up day-care costs. After weighing their options, they decided to hire an au pair, a young woman from a foreign country, to live in their home for 12 months. More than seven years...
Let's Get Our Priorities Straight. (Washington in Brief)
Principles are a fine thing in stable times, but when some al-Qaeda lunatic is coming through the window in a 747 it's hardly a time for shouting about one's rights. There are some people shouting, though. As this magazine has noted, libertarians are...
Looking beyond the Taliban: President Bush's Stance on the War against Terrorism Has Created New Alliances, but Once the Taliban Regime Is Defeated in Afghanistan What Will Happen Remains Unclear. (Nation: Foreign Policy)
October is Nobel Peace Prize time. Even when peace is far off in the horizon, the Swedish Academy still doles out the prizes, often using the opportunity to make political commentary. This year, two awards raised eyebrows. For the literature prize,...
Mission Episcopal: Episcopalians in the Rocky Mountain West Who Are Fed Up with Their Church's Liberal Leadership Have Created a New Denomination That Seeks to Return to Traditional Religion
One would never confuse the Anglican Church of the Covenant with Westminster Abbey. The congregation meets in an elementary-school gymnasium, where 60 parishioners sit on folding chairs. Music is provided by a guitarist as two teen-agers in shorts...
Olympic Tragedy: 1972 Revisited: The Shadow of Terrorism Still Haunts the Olympics Almost 30 Years after Israeli Athletes Were Massacred in Munich. Could the Games in Salt Lake City Be a Nightmare Revisited? (Nation: Olympic Terror)
At 4:30 a.m. on Sept. 5, 1972, five Palestinian Arabs dressed in tracksuits and carrying gym bags climbed a 6-foot-high security fence surrounding the Olympic Village in Munich, West Germany. The dozens of onlookers thought nothing of it as Olympic...
PC Security: Clinton-Era `Tolerance' and `Diversity' Training Have Wrapped the U.S. Military in Red Tape and Produced More-Sensitive Spies at the CIA. the Training Continues. (Cover Story)
An army of "change agents" has been assigned to transform how U.S. soldiers, sailors, airmen and spies think, feel and behave. Supported by political pressure from above and peer pressure from within the system, the change agents are trying to impose...
Piece of Republican Pork Puts Fiscal Principles to the Test. (Waste & Abuse)
High principles are easy to hold in the abstract but often fall prey to more worldly and specific temptations, especially expediency, as any regular observer of the Washington scene can attest. This seems to be the case with one piece of pork coveted...
Pill Turns 50: Birth-Control Pills Are Commonplace in Medicine Cabinets, but Are They Safe?
After a half-century of research and refinement, many doctors agree that the birth-control pill -- whatever its sociological ramifications -- is safer than its predecessors and helps stave off ovarian cancer and regulate menstrual cycles. Other positive...
Priority No. 1: Homeland Security. (the Last Word)
Already finger-pointing can be seen and questions heard in the vast array of congressional, intelligence and federal law-enforcement offices. "Who's at fault?" is the question, and the answer, of course, is "Not me." But as Mary Ryan, a senior official...
Prisoners Get the Butt of the Bargain: State Smokes. (News Alert!)
Last month, cigarettes became another illegal commodity in Maryland prisons. In settling a second-hand-smoke lawsuit, Maryland's Department of Public Safety and Correctional Services decided to ban cigarettes altogether, joining states such as New...
Securing the Homeland: The Recent Acts of the Bush Administration and Congress to Organize a Homeland Defense against Terrorism Follow the Same Lines Proposed by the Clinton Administration. (Nation: Counterterrorism)
In response to the Sept. 11 attacks on the Pentagon and New York City's World Trade Center, both President George W. Bush and Congress have taken steps intended to protect the nation from further assault by terrorists. Whether any of these will prove...
Should All in Congress Have Security Clearance? (Washington in Brief)
As noted in Insight last week (see "Bush Issues New Marching Orders," Nov. 5), there's considerable concern about the leaking of information from classified briefings. But just who is leaking information? President George W. Bush suggests it is members...
Strengthening U.S. Hungarian Relations: Geza Jeszenszky, the Ambassador from Hungary Who Spent Much of His Life under the Oppression of Communism, Has High Hopes for Hungary's Future
Geza Jeszenszky, Hungary's ambassador to Washington, is a historian and an expert on international relations. He's also an avid skier who is fond of slopes in Colorado and California. Jeszenszky was 15 when the Hungarian Revolution of 1956 broke...
Symposium
Q: Should the U.S. seek to remove the regimes that support terrorism? Yes: Apply to terror havens the same strategy Reagan used to roll back the Evil Empire. There is, as a practical matter, only one way to deal effectively and durably with international...
Turning Points: Two Historians Argue That America Is Approaching a Period of Upheaval
"There is a mysterious cycle in human events," said President Franklin D. Roosevelt in 1936 during the Great Depression. "To some generations, much is given. Of other generations, much is expected. This generation has a rendezvous with destiny." ...
U.S. Must Free Minds Held Captive by Hatred. (Fair Comment)
This first war of the new millennium is a war of minds. This war will not be won by conquering bodies and real estate, but rather minds and hearts. This war is to be waged on a different kind of battlefield -- in the religious academies and schools....
What to Do about Afghanistan? as the U.S. Ponders the Question That Plagued the British Empire, Her Leaders Would Do Well to Reflect on `the Man Who Would Be King,' a Tale about the Dangers of Imperialism. (Special Report)
No great adventure movie, not even Lawrence of Arabia, offers more insights into the possibility of an upcoming war in Afghanistan than John Huston's 1975 film The Man Who Would Be King. Starring Sean Connery and Michael Caine, it is based on an 1888...
Wimped out in Washington: As Defeating Terrorism Takes Precedence, the House's Anthrax-Scare Freak-Out Could Pale in Comparison to When Legislators First Hear Proposals to Cut Their Special-Interest Programs. (Washington's Week)
Once upon a time ground-up human remains, bird dung and baking soda shared no imaginable commonality and hardly ever struck fear into the hearts of our countrymen. But all now have been misperceived as anthrax in a country where the term biological...
Winning Hearts and Minds: The Bush Administration Has Launched a War of Words in Addition to Its Military Strikes in an Attempt to Sway the People of the Middle East to the Side of the United States. (Nation: Psyops)
President George W. Bush has chosen a number of forums in which to enunciate U.S. objectives of the war on terrorism. Whether it was in front of a joint session of Congress, at a formal White House press conference or at one of many daily briefings,...
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