Insight on the News

Insight on the newspaper is a magazine specializing in General topics.

Articles from Vol. 10, No. 50, December 12

A Vast Sea of Federal Power, Lapping at Islands of Freedom
In this land where the people rule, many believe the people's rulers are out of control. Although the people just spoke clearly to the problem of overweening government, the Supreme Court will be hearing a case that could reimpose more lasting restraints...
Blacks Should View Election as Opportunity
There is much wait and gnashing of teeth among the leading lights in the black establishment about the election blowout by the GOP. Black political leaders, who are uniformly liberal Democrats, see the writing on the wall - their fiefdoms are about...
Common Sense Will Unclog Legal System
Complaints about too many lawyers have almost become cliched - more lawyers in Los Angeles County than in all of Japan, one lawsuit for every 10 adults in America a fourth of all civil suits either frivolous or fraudulent. Anecdotally, we hear horror...
Founding Feminists Beware: A New Generation Is in Charge
Betty Friedan, one of the founding mothers of modern feminism, and Barry Goldwater, who set off the conservative revolution 30 years ago, may have more in common than they know. Both were short-term disasters. A lot of angry women mangled the...
High Road Could Pierce the Heart of Darkness
Completing the Pan-American Highway would link North and South America via Panama's Darien jungle. Congress is holding out on the project, however, sensitive to the cries of environmentalists. Panama has always presented challenges. Here, scientists...
In Rio, Millions Move to the Violent Beat of Urban Funk
On Friday nights, teenagers from No de Janeiro's north-side slums crowd into nightclubs featuring popular `nervous dances,' where rival gangs are welcome as part of the entertainment. About 800 gang members shadowbox and scream threats as the whirling...
'New Democratic' Bandwagon Was Playing the Wrong Song
Barely noticed among the reams of statistics on election night was the quiet death of the "New Democrat" agenda. Two years ago, this was the greatest hope of a reawakened Democratic Party. Today, it virtually has disappeared from the political stage....
New Malaria Vaccine Shows Some Promise
A serum that has shown limited success in early testing is boosting optimism in the fight against a disease that has eluded a cure. Malaria, the mosquito-borne disease that kills millions of people each year, is facing a formidable new foe: a vaccine....
Rodent Tests Continue to Save Human Lives
I wonder if the person who first noticed that "if you ask a silly question, you'll get a silly answer" realized that sometimes it's to the advantage of those who benefit from the silly answers to pose the questions in the first place. Elizabeth Whelan...
Russian Emigrants Tread Water off Japanese Bay
Facing spartan conditions and a watery economy, Russian inhabitants of the Kurils live in limbo. Although pro-Japanese sentiment is on the upswing, many people just want to go home. At first sight, the spare, windswept island of Kunashir off the...
Some Turks Fear 'Back to Basics' Politics Foreshadows Fanaticism
Secularists worry that islamic fundamentalism is spreading across Turkey, but others compare the movement to the religious right in the United States - a healthy sign of a maturing democracy. Imagine Pat Robertson as mayor of New York. That's how...
Stop Banning Products at the Drop of a Rat
Most Americans do not realize the extent to which rodents negatively influence our priorities when it comes to public-health expenditures. Spending on environmental regulations is affected along with the cost of goods and services, insurance premiums,...
The World Gorges at the Arms Cornucopia
The end of the Cold War transformed the global arms market, but there hasn't been a corresponding reevaluation of weapons policy. Who is profiting under current international arrangements? The United States has become the largest arms producer and...
Trial by Jury Is Scourge of U.S. Courts
In the good old days, officers of the court, acting for Hilton Hotels, would have thrown former Navy Lt. Paula Coughlin into a pond. If Coughlin had sunk to the bottom, it would have proved her innocence and truthfulness, and the Hilton people would...
Welfare Could Be First Big Test for Republicans
When Congress convenes, the Republicans will make welfare reform a priority. Expect Democrats to oppose the Personal Responsibility Ad by citing what they see as its deleterious effect on children. Buried in the electoral rubble, some liberal opponents...
When Politics and Morality Mixed in Print
An artist is his own fault, John O'Hara said, and O'Hara delivered himself into literary oblivion. An arrogant and immodest man, he proclaimed himself the best writer of his time, and critics rightly rejected such self-aggrandizement. Anyway, his books...
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