Insight on the News

Insight on the newspaper is a magazine specializing in General topics.

Articles from Vol. 10, No. 21, May 23

Don't Read Politics into American Literature
In the hands of politically correct teachers, American literature has gone from being studied in an objective, responsible manner to being utilized as little more than a vehicle for attacks on America. During the last 25 years, as one minority movement...
Gun Sweeps Brush off Civil Rights
In an attempt to quell the violence and stop the gunfire echoing within the projects of Chicago, the city began to search for weapons in the homes of the poor. Were a community's civil eights trampled? When Chicago police began raiding housing projects...
Hillsdale Goes It Alone, Remains True to Itself
The differences between Hillsdale College and other institutions are manifested from the bottom up. The small, rural school has faced adversity in blazing its own trail and revels in its independence. Hillsdale College lies on the north side of...
In Clinton's Reduction Plan, You'll Pay for the Free Ride
When Congress last August enacted new taxes on business meals and entertainment, among other things, as part of President Clinton's deficit reduction plan (read: deduction reduction), it failed to include two deductions required by anyone sorting through...
Mother Mary Says Liberals Are Doing the Devil's Work
A Franciscan nun broadcasting from Alabama is spreading the orthodox word -- and has liberal Catholics, including an archbishop, running for cover. Mother Mary Angelica is the closest thing Roman Catholics have to Rush Limbaugh. A popular conservative...
No Love Lost in Barney Camp as Lawyers Sing "I Sue You." (Lawsuit over Lyrics to Song on PBS Program 'Barney and Friends' Contrasts with Public's Love for the Show) (the Last Word) (Column)
One of the great truths of our society, a constant that holds up with the unshakeable certitude of e=[mc.sup.2] in physics, is that where there are millions of dollars, there will be lawyers as well. For example, Barney. Yes, Barney the dinosaur...
Political Contexts Enhance Classics
In Recovering American Literature, Peter Shaw argues that "political correctness has sabotaged the study of American literature" and proposes to save five of our classic works from the trivializing gestures of those "Lilliputians" who insist on cutting...
Public Funds Could Topple Ivory Towers
Higher education is in dire straits, writes George Roche. The college president believes that public money is an opiate that has sedated and corrupted academia, leaving it virtually unable to support itself. American higher education is galloping...
Tangling the Web of Foreign Policy
As one observes the thoroughness with which the Clinton administration is making a hash-up of foreign policy from the Balkans to the Korean peninsula, a cynical thought occurs: Could there be method to this madness? Could April's debacles in Bosnia...
Terrorism Must Continue to Be a Top Priority
Six Americans are killed and more than 1,000 injured in the World Trade Center bombing. The bombers are found guilty, while others await trial for plotting to destroy New York City landmarks and murder American officials. Saddam Hussein tries to assassinate...
Western Ideals Aren't Found in Killing Field
In a tiny central African country that most Americans have never even heard of, people on the wrong side of a tribal divide are being slaughtered by the tens of thousands. The heartfelt cry going up in the United States about Rwanda is: Why are people...
Why Money Can't Buy a Better Education
In this adaptation from The Fall of the ivory Tower, the Hillsdale College president traces the demise of higher education during the lost 30 years. Higher education in America has become a popular bull's-eye -- with good reason. In spite of a massive...
Will Nixon Survive History's Remix?
He recorded one of America's worst political scandals and rocked the notion with his resignation from the presidency. But many historians believe the accomplishments of Richard M. Nixon will outlast his gaffs. He was the first president to resign,...
WWII Reporters Knew How to Tell a Story
Print and radio correspondents often were the sole conduits for transporting information from the front lines, and Ed Murrow, Ernie Pyle and others reported with an elan lacking in the TV era. A new exhibit at the National Portrait Gallery tries to...
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