Insight on the News

Insight on the newspaper is a magazine specializing in General topics.

Articles from Vol. 18, No. 36, September 30

20 Reasons to Overthrow Saddam: The Media Say the Bush Team Hasn't Made Its Case for Invading Iraq. but Statements by Dick Cheney Make Clear Why the U.S. Will Invade Iraq and Finish off Saddam. (World: Iraq)
President George W. Bush intends to finish off Saddam Hussein once and for all. A spectrum of options is at his disposal, from covert operations against the Iraqi leader to a range of military actions that include outright invasion in partnership...
A Letter from the Editor
Dear Readers, Have you ever wondered what your part of the country looked like a 100 or 200 years ago? How our forefathers (and mothers) managed to survive the long trek through fields and streams and across mountains, let alone managing to find...
A `Sex God' in the Most Traditional of Senses
The Religious Coalition for Reproductive Choice (RCRC) convened its annual National Black Religious Summit on Sexuality in the nation's capital in July. Once again, socially conservative black churches were chided for adhering to traditional Christian...
Back on the Cutting Edge: The Laguiole Knife-The Imperative Tool of the 19th-Century French Peasant Farmer-Now Has Become a Symbol of Uber-Style. (Cuisine)
For my birthday this year, the Husband gave me not one but three Laguiole knives. This might be viewed by certain friends as a continuation of those early anniversaries when, having presented me with a TV set and then a shortwave radio, I was tempted...
Collectors Vie for `Relics' of the Space Race. (Nation in Brief)
When you think of what's new in terms of human endeavor, one area that could come to mind is the space program. Most of the happenings in that arena have occurred within the last 50 years. So it might seem a bit odd to learn that there is a category...
Constitutional Crisis Looms as Democrats Stonewall Bush Judges: Increasingly, Senators Are Looking for Nominees to the Federal Judiciary Who Will Be Quasi-Legislators and Use Their Rulings to Set Aside Law and Precedent for a Political Result. (U.S. Constitution)
The extremely low number of Senate confirmations for President George W. Bush's appointees for federal judgeships is the result of more than just politics as usual, says a recent policy analysis from a Washington think tank. The delays reflect a...
D.C. Not Duped by IOC Con: The Olympics' Culture of Corruption Takes Its Sleazy Scandals Elsewhere. (Sports)
The nation's capital promises not to come down with an inferiority complex after being dismissed by the 13-member panel of the U.S. Olympic Committee (USOC) as a site for the 2012 Summer Olympic Games. Washington/Baltimore failed to pass the...
Debate about Iraq Could Help GOP at Polls. (Political Notebook)
Republicans should be thanking Iraq--or at least the current brouhaha about whether the United States should mount an invasion to effect a "regime change" in Baghdad. This has shifted the focus of media attention away from economic woes and corporate...
Earning Airtime for Conservative Ideas: Public-Relations Guru Craig Shirley Has Had a Hand in Turning Bright Conservatives into Best-Selling Authors, While Still Focusing on His Love of Old-Time Lobbying. (Picture Profile)
Craig Shirley is president of Shirley & Banister Public Affairs, a firm based in Alexandria, Va., that has backed conservative authors such as former FBI agent Gary Aldrich and National Rifle Association Executive Vice President Wayne LaPierre....
Fall Colors, Food and Many Other Maine Events: Among Places to See in the Pine Tree State Are Historic Lighthouses, a First-Class Museum, the Kotzschmar Organ and Some of the Best Seafood Houses in America. (Travel)
Now is the time to head up to Maine to catch those color-soaked leaves and mountain vistas. And if you are looking for a San Francisco Bay-area atmosphere, but on a human scale, try Portland with its craggy seascapes punctuated by working lighthouses,...
Germany Grapples with Immigration: As an Influx of Immigrants Challenges What It Means to Be German, Particularly within the Muslim Community, Politicians Fumble with a Potentially Explosive Issue. (World: Germany)
The second most commonly spoken language in Germany isn't French, Spanish or even English. It is Turkish, the language of the 2.5 million ethnic Turks who live and work in Germany as a postwar legacy of its guest-worker program. Walking along...
Hatfill's Rights Infringed by `New Gestapo'; Media Unmoved. (Fair Comment)
Is voting Republican voting for a police state? Those who saw Steven Hatfill's Aug. 25 Fox News press conference must be asking themselves this question. Once again, the FBI and (the so-called) Department of Justice (DOJ) are displaying what...
Into the Wild: For the First Time in More Than a Century, the Smithsonian Institution Will Share Artist George Catlin's Enduring Portrait of America in the 1830s, Comprising His Many Captivating Paintings of Indian Tribes and Landscapes of the Untamed West in Which They Lived. (Cover Story)
The year 1826 was a big one in the life of 30-year-old George Catlin. Three years earlier he had sold his law books and abandoned a promising career in law to devote himself to art. He painted portraits, often in miniature, in Philadelphia. Sometimes...
Netherlands Panel Rejects ADHD Diagnosis as a Mental Illness. (News Alert!)
The recent ruling of the Netherlands Advertisement Code Commission (NACC) concerning the diagnosis of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) may be a first step toward exposing in the United States what many experts long have argued is...
New DoD Inspector General Cleans House. (the Last Word)
An independent review of the Department of Defense Inspector General's Office (DoDIG) has determined that the new inspector general, Joseph E. Schmitz, inherited "serious problems" dating back four or five years, according to sources familiar with...
No Hyperlinks to Test Success: Though Many Schools Now Are Wired, the Internet Is Not a Panacea in the World of Standardized Student Testing. (Education)
Although U.S. government efforts to connect public schools to the Internet have been highly successful, they have failed to result in an increase in student achievement on standardized tests, a recently published study says. "If the goal of the...
Scientist Bridge Political Divide: Despite the Hostilities between Their Two Countries, M.V. Ramana and Zia Mian Formed a Friendship They Hope Can Keep India and Pakistan out of a Nuclear War. (World: Nuclear Weapons)
Some friendships defy the most testing times. In this case two scientists from India and Pakistan have snubbed convention and the logic of war by jointly highlighting the consequences of a nuclear exchange for their region. U.S.-educated M.V....
Scientist with Rhodesian Past Still Center of Media Crosshairs. (Fair Comment)
Much of the media's "case" against scientist Steven Hatfill, dubbed a "person of interest" by the FBI in its investigation of the anthrax-contaminated letters that last fall killed five people and sickened more than a dozen others, rests on two...
Security Cracks at the White House: Critics Express Concern That an Access-Control System Built in the Final Months of the Clinton Administration Leaves the White House Vulnerable to Security Threats. (Special Report)
One year after the Sept. 11 attacks the national focus still is on homeland security. From local banks to city halls, officials frantically are working to make American institutions less vulnerable to terrorist attack. Many assumed the hardening...
Speaking French. (for the People)
The French are very proud of what they like to call the "clarity" of their language when it's used at its best. And when it's at the top of its form French can be magnifique, as the following pithy remarks from prominent Frenchmen, past and present,...
Strange Happenings in the Middle West. (for the People)
More odd events from the hot summer of 2002: One night in August folks who live in Cedar Rapids, Iowa, awoke to dramatic but mysterious sounds coming from the vicinity of St. James United Methodist Church. What could it be? A church service scheduled...
Symposium
Q: Should the United States invest heavily in new efforts to advance public diplomacy? YES: The state of world affairs demands nothing less than a new public-diplomacy paradigm. Public diplomacy--the use of communications strategies and tactics...
Whales Come Long Way since Moby Dick
Keiko, the celebrity killer whale of Free Willy fame, has been much in the news since surfacing in a Norwegian fjord a month-and-a-half after having been released from a pen in Iceland. While many fans celebrated Keiko's freedom, some experts involved...
Wolfowitz Praises Moderate Islam in `War on Terror' Speech. (News Alert!)
In a recent speech on "U.S. Relations With the Muslim World After 9/11" at the Brookings Institution in Washington, Deputy Defense Secretary Paul Wolfowitz praised Turkey and Indonesia, while warning that U.S. support of moderate Muslims will be...
Working to Find an Advantage. (Washington's Week)
In the normal world, Labor Day marks the end of summer and the beginning of the collegiate- and pro-football seasons, a long weekend often spent in a frenzied state of shopping for school and barbecuing. But in the political world the holiday signals...

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