Foreign Policy

This magazine covers global politics and economics in its articles, essays and feature stories.

Articles from No. 186, May-June

An Eerie Silence: Why Is It So Hard for South Africa to Talk about AIDS?
IN 2005, AS SOUTH AFRICA'S government was cautiously revising its restrictive policy on antiretroviral drugs, I set out to write a book exploring how ordinary people would react: whether they would take the medication, or whether the stigma would prevent...
Eat, Drink, Protest: Stories of the Middle East's Hungry Rumblings: Buying Peace, One Feast at a Time
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] THERE ARE MANY WAYS TO CELEBRATE a military victory--you can sack a city, purge your opponents, or put on a flight suit and strut around an aircraft carrier. In August 2006, I was in Lebanon, where bridges, highways, and entire...
Food, Fill in the Blanks: We Asked the World's Leading Experts to Tell Us What Organic Really Means, How Well Be Feeding a Hungry World in 50 Years-And What Is the Planet's Stupidest Food Fad
THE BEST WAY TO FEED THE WORLD IN 50 YEARS IS ... To grow food where most of us live, in cities.--DICKSON D. DESPOMMIER * To commercialize agriculture.--PAUL COLLIER * To get our act together to contain climate change, which will lead to severe weather...
Freedom Funders
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] "PROMOTING DEMOCRACY" HAS OFTEN BEEN CODE for spreading American ideals in a hostile world. The democracy promotion industry has roots in the Cold War, but truly blossomed after the fall of the Berlin Wall, when millions of...
Gene Sharp
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] At 83, Gene Sharp has seen more than a bit of history. For decades, the mild-mannered democracy activist and University of Massachusetts professor of political science quietly wrote dozens of books about nonviolent revolution...
Half a Miracle: Medellin's Rebirth Is Nothing Short of Astonishing. but Have the Drug Lords Really Been Vanquished?
FIFTEEN YEARS AGO, a single mother named Libia Gomez converted part of her modest cinder-block house into a shop selling sundries ranging from pencils to toothpaste. The location was hardly ideal. Gomez lived in Santo Domingo Savio, a onetime squatter...
How Food Explains the World
THEY SAY YOU ARE WHAT YOU EAT. And that applies to countries and cultures as much as individuals. The food in our mouths defines us in far more fundamental and visceral terms than the gas in our tanks or the lines on a map. So it's not surprising that...
Iron Ladies: Why Women Leaders Aren't the Peaceniks You Think
"AS A WOMAN, I can't go to war and I refuse to send anyone else," said Rep. Jeannette Rankin, the Montana Republican who famously cast the sole congressional vote against declaring war on Japan following the bombing of Pearl Harbor. But these days,...
Letter from the Editor
WHEN WE STARTED DISCUSSING the idea for a special issue on the unlikely FOREIGN POLICY subject of food last fall, there were not yet any revolutions in the Arab world. No disillusioned young men were wielding baguettes in the streets of Middle Eastern...
More Than 1 Billion People Are Hungry in the World. but What If the Experts Are Wrong?
FOR MANY IN THE WEST, poverty is almost synonymous with hunger. Indeed, the announcement by the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization in 2009 that more than i billion people are suffering from hunger grabbed headlines in a way that any number...
The Baguettes of War: Inside the Middle East's Defiant Kitchens
THIS WINTER, the kitchens of the Middle East took to the streets. In Egypt, Tunisia, and Yemen, men demonstrated wearing frying-pan basinets. Tin-pot cervellieres. Water-bucket shakos. The green, plastic chain mail of a wastebasket. A young man...
The Future of Food
THREE YEARS AGO, as markets were heading toward collapse, one set of prices made a startling and disruptive leap: food. With rice and wheat more than doubling, riots broke out from Haiti to Bangladesh, to Cameroon to Egypt. Then oil prices went down...
The New Geopolitics of Food: From the Middle East to Madagascar, High Prices Are Spawning Land Grabs and Ousting Dictators. Welcome to the 21st-Century Food Wars
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] IN THE UNITED STATES, when world wheat prices rise by 75 percent, as they have over the last year, it means the difference between a $2 loaf of bread and a loaf costing maybe $2.10. If, however, you live in New Delhi, those...
The Ultimate Ally: The "Realists" Are Wrong: America Needs Israel Now More Than Ever
WHAT IS THE DEFINITION OF AN AMERICAN ALLY? On an ideological level, an ally is a country that shares America's values, reflects its founding spirit, and resonates with its people's beliefs. Tactically, an ally stands with the United States through...
Think Again: Dictators: Arab Autocrats May Be Tottering, but the World's Tyrants Aren't All Quaking in Their Steel-Toed Boots
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] "Dictatorships are all about the dictator." RARELY, IF EVER. In the first months after the Arab revolutions began, the world's televisions were filled with instantly iconic images of a crumbling old order: the Ben Ali...
Veil of Ignorance: Have We Gotten the Headscarf All Wrong?
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] IN 1955, ALBERT HOURANI, the Oxford historian and bestselling author of A History of the Arab Peoples, published a short article called "The Vanishing Veil: A Challenge to the Old Order." Pointing out that veiling was a fast-disappearing...
Why Recessions Are Good for Freedom
"THE MORE WELL-TO-DO A NATION, the greater the chances that it will sustain democracy," wrote American political sociologist Seymour Martin Lipset in 1959, crystallizing the idea, now a received wisdom, that wealth is the inevitable handmaiden of political...
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