Foreign Policy

This magazine covers global politics and economics in its articles, essays and feature stories.

Articles from No. 175, November-December

Akbar Ganji: A Former Tenant of Tehran's Infamous Evin Prison and Award-Winning Investigative Journalist Offers His Advice to Those Who Carry on the Fight
At the time of the revolution, I was a 19-year-old kid. I lived in one of the most poverty-stricken parts of Tehran and was active in the anti-shah resistance. I was captured by the illusion that we could create a new history and change the course...
Are You a Globalization Junkie?
Then test your knowledge of global trends, economics, and politics with 8 questions about how the world works. 1 The United States spends $7,290 per person annually on health care, the most of any country. How much does the No. 2 country spend?...
Doped: How Two Plants Wreak Havoc on the Countries That Produce and Consume Them-And Everyone in Between
The illicit drug trade is the ultimate value-added chain. As cocaine and heroin make their perilous journeys from the fields of Colombia and Afghanistan to markets in U.S. and European cities, each border crossed and each trafficker involved adds dollars...
English Spoken Here: How Globalization Is Changing the Indian Novel
In a scene early in Vikram Chandra's massive 2006 cops-and-robbers novel Sacred Games, the small-time gangster Ganesh Gaitonde sells some stolen gold and feels, for the first time in his life, wealthy and powerful. He goes looking for pleasure on the...
Foreignpolicy.Com
Every day, ForeignPolicy.com poses big questions from big writers: Why is oil such a pernicious influence in Africa? Is Russia fated to be enemies with its neighbors? Should the United States blow up its State Department and start all over again? We...
Forget Twitter, Think TV
First, the good news: TV might not be so bad for the planet after all. In his perceptive, engaging, and wide-roaming cover story, "Revolution in a Box," economist Charles Kenny tells us why television, whether or not it turns Western children into...
God: As Casualties from the World's Religious Wars Mount, God Is Getting a Bad Reputation. but the War against God Has Had Its Casualties as Well. Here's Why We Need a Truce-And Why Secularism Is Almost as Much of a Threat to the World as Fundamentalism
"God Is Dead." No. When Friedrich Nietzsche announced the death of God in 1882, he thought that in the modern, scientific world people would soon be unable to countenance the idea of religious faith. By the time The Economist did its famous "God...
Hot Potato: The Little Tuber That Gave Us Modernity
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] Does the modern world owe its very existence to the humble spud? A recent study by a pair of economists suggests that the introduction of the American potato to Europe and later Asia and Africa might have been one of the most...
Howard Roark in New Delhi: The Surprising Popularity of a Libertarian Hero in India
Consumer spending in the United States may be down, but an interest in Ayn Rand certainly is not. Sales of Rand's last novel, the vigorously pro-capitalism fable Atlas Shrugged, have seen a huge leap in 2009, briefly outperforming even President Barack...
My Secret Plan to Overthrow the Mullahs
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] It was late February 2003, a few weeks before the U.S. invasion of Iraq, and President George W. Bush's administration still lacked a real strategy for the would-be regional hegemon next door. As the Iran desk officer in the...
New Order
The multipolar world has become a global reality, recognized as a near certainty by no less an authority than the U.S. intelligence community. But it wasn't always such. For most of its geopolitical life, "multipolar" has been a synonym for America-bashing,...
Plague: A New Thriller of the Coming Pandemic
SOMETIMES FICTION CAN DO MORE TO CHANGE public opinion than nonfiction. It took Upton Sinclair's 1906 novel, The Jungle, to awaken the public to the dangers of sausage and the meat-packing industry in general. Another example, if I can be so presumptuous,...
Recipe for Failure: Why Copenhagen Will Be a Bust, and Other Prophecies from the Foreign-Policy World's Leading Predictioneer
Want to know what's going to happen with climate change? Is the world going to come together this December at the Copenhagen summit, or at some future date, and regulate away enough of the greenhouse gases that are heating up the planet to warm Al...
Revolution in a Box: It's Not Twitter or Facebook That's Reinventing the Planet. Eighty Years after the First Commercial Broadcast Crackled to Life, Television Still Rules Our World. and Let's Hear It for the Growing Legions of Couch Potatoes: All Those Soap Operas Might Be the Ticket to a Better Future after All
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] The television," science-fiction writer Ray Bradbury lamented in 1953, is "that insidious beast, that Medusa which freezes a billion people to stone every night, staring fixedly, that Siren which called and sang and promised...
'See You Soon, If We're Still Alive': The Only Two Westerners Living on Their Own in Kandahar Have Been Bombed, Ambushed, and Nearly Sold to Kidnappers. Here's What They've Learned about the Country Where War Just Won't End
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] For a split second the room seems to vibrate under the pressure of the shock wave. Ears ring, heads retract, and muscles contract. Your mind jump-starts: Did the explosion sound big or small? Where did it come from? You hesitate,...
Shadowy Finance: Schemers Didn't Lose in the Economic Crisis. They Won All over Again. and Here's Why
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] WELCOME TO THE NEW SHADOW financial system, a world where regulators are hampered and bankers are bold. The "old" shadow financial system, before the bubbles burst, thrived on ample liquidity and lax regulations. The new one...
Take Me Back to Constantinople: How Byzantium, Not Rome, Can Help Preserve Pax Americana
Economic crisis, mounting national debt, excessive foreign commitments--this is no way to run an empire. America needs serious strategic counseling. And fast. It has never been Rome, and to adopt its strategies now--its ruthless expansion of empire,...
The Hermit Kingdom: An Unchanging, Irrational Stalinist Dictatorship? Not So Much
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] Forget the hairdos and the funny suits. Kim Jong Il is no madman. We don't have access to his shrink, of course, but there's absolutely no evidence to suggest that he's irrational. In terms of judging his own people and...
What a Pest: Why the Black Death Still Won't Die
For a microscopic organism, Yersinia pestis has made an outsize mark on human history. It has felled some 200 million human beings since it first evolved, in addition to provoking political, economic, social, and cultural upheavals. This toll of death...

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.