Education

Founded in 1880, Education is a quarterly journal owned and published by Project Innovation. Editorial headquarters are located in Mobile, Ala. Education has an estimated subscription base of 2,900 readers. The journal specializes in the publication of original research and theoretical analysis of subject matter related to innovations in education and teacher preparation. These areas of study and inquiry are applicable to educators across a broad range of teaching, learning and education. The journal accepts unsolicited manuscripts. However, as Education is independently operated and does not receive funding from membership dues or advertising, authors or their sponsoring organization are required to pay a fee for the publication of their material in the journal. The Editor of Education is Phil Feldman.

Articles from Vol. 43, No. 1, Spring

Art: The Value of Things
Wilful blindness of the forces at play in the value of things has accompanied the rise of the marketplace as a universal equivalent, slowly eroding any distinctions between the economic and non-economic. The ideal of the museum, a repository for the...
Checking the Books: What Are Universities For?
One of the first things I learnt when I took my first university job was that academics are even worse whingers than farmers. Gather two or three together and within minutes conversation will turn to what's wrong with students, colleagues, administrators,...
Editorial
Few governments who have made election pledges to put education at the heart of their agenda have carried them out in office. But then none have had a prime minister with school-aged children in the state sector and a secretary of state whose offspring...
Filling an Emptying Bath, or Understanding Humanities Funding
When I came to work in Cardiff in 1994 and was soon invited to take over control of the School budget, it became clear that we had a serious leak in our funding. Because of the educationally admirable University of Wales practice whereby students take...
How It Was That Exam Results Became the Talk of the Steamie
Teenagers can often be heard wailing and gnashing their teeth in summer when the public exam results are published. But never have so many cries been wailed or teeth gnashed as there were in August last year in Scotland. From Kirkcudbright to Lerwick,...
How Not to Educate the Information Age Workforce
Tony Blair, in the 1997 general election campaign, famously made education his top three priorities. He was more emphatic than most, but it is every politician's top priority, and certainly every parent's. Yet there are no aspects of modern societies...
Including the Socially Excluded: League Tables and Labour's Schools Policy
In the autumn before he was elected prime minister, Tony Blair, in a fit of possibly misplaced hubris, announced that his party would have a thousand days to prepare for the next thousand years. In the event it was only 974 days from the election to...
Increasing Educational Opportunity
The time has come to question the easy assumption made by politicians, particularly the present government, that education -- implicitly compulsory -- is, of itself, a good thing. Education, education, education has become more, more, more. Not more...
Language: A Light(er) Extinguished
`After 16 Years, Dr Lighter's Lexicon, Half-Done, Still Earns Experts' Praise' Wall Street Journal, 7 September 2000 Thus the terse summation of sixteen years' work, brought to an abrupt halt, as the story that follows explains, not, for once, through...
Mind the Gap: The Creative Conundrum
Senior politicians, including the Prime Minister, argue that it is vital to promote creativity and innovation throughout education. This was a theme of Tony Blair's electioneering speeches in the run up to the 1997 landslide. He made it one of the...
Not in Front of the Parents: How `Education Speak' Prevents Teachers from Being Heard
On a lamp-post halfway across Parker's Piece in Cambridge, at an imaginary dividing line between the university and the rest of the town, an anonymous wit once put up a sign that read: `Reality Checkpoint'. In my dealings with many, but not all, educators...
R. S. Thomas, 1913-2000
In 1958 R. S. Thomas agreed to become a sponsor for a new journal, Critical Quarterly, which I was about to launch with A. E. Dyson. He joined our honorary committee. Tony Dyson was already an enthusiast for his poetry, and in subsequent years we regularly...
Text, Culture, Rhetoric: Some Futures for English(1)
In his book on character analysis Wilhelm Reich describes character as a kind of armour, a rigid suit that one bolts on and that its wearer then comes to resemble.(2) It's a metaphor that Jacques Lacan picks up in a phrase about the `blazons of phobia',...
The Really Useful Company: Graduates, Employment and the Humanities
What are universities for? No, seriously. For enlightenment? Intellectual debate? `Widening participation'? Development of skills? Training for the professions? Ah, now we see it. The slippery slope of current political rhetoric becomes insidious as...
What Kinds of More Mean Better? Continuous Scholarisation or Lifelong Learning
I write from an institution which has been concerned for 175 years with the education of adults. The Mechanics Institutes, of which Birkbeck was an early member, were set up in the early part of the nineteenth century to provide educational opportunities...
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