The Hastings Center Report

The Hastings Center Report is a bimonthly magazine addressing ethical issues in medicine and the life sciences for an audience of physicians and other health care practitioners, attorneys and professionals in business and academia. Founded in Feb. of 1971, The Hastings Center publishes this magazine. Subjects for the Hastings Center Report are medicine and surgery. The Managing Editor is Joyce Griffin. Gregory E. Kaebnick is the Editor.

Articles from Vol. 34, No. 4, July-August

Extreme Prematurity and Parental Rights after Baby Doe: The Child Abuse Amendments of 1984 Established the Norms for Treating Disabled Newborns, but They Did Not Address the Treatment of Premature Babies. Parents and Physicians Need a Framework for Decisionmaking. A Decision Handed Down Recently by the Texas Supreme Court Is a Step Forward
Contemporary ethical and legal norms hold that all human beings born alive should be treated equally, regardless of disability. Yet there is a strong sense that some lives are so diminished in capacity for interaction or experience that little good...
Field Notes
From "Idea" to "impact." In late May, I received a phone call from a member of the National Council of Churches, a consortium of thirty-six Orthodox and Protestant denominations that represent fifty million members of 100,000 congregations in the United...
Finding Our Way
The day Amanda was transferred to our Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU), we communicated our anxiety, born of experience, by sidelong glances and terse descriptions of her array of cardiac anomalies. "Like Jeremy's, but worse. No main pulmonary...
Genetic Research & Communal Narratives
The risks and benefits of genetic research extend beyond individual subjects. Genetic research can also affect the communities to which the subjects belong, by rewriting the narratives and reconfiguring the identities that members of the community...
Horror Regulationum
The advance of new technologies has been rapid at the intersection of assisted reproduction, human genomic knowledge and technique, and human embryo research. These technologies also have had and promise to continue to have a major impact on the well-being...
Identity Crisis
The psychologist Erik Erickson first popularized the term "identity" in the 1950s to describe the sense of self that individuals are supposed to possess. Since then, the term has taken on so many meanings as to become almost meaningless--or in the...
Implications of the Papal Allocution on Feeding Tubes
The recent papal allocution To the International Congress on Life-Sustaining Treatment and Vegetative State." Scientific Advances and Ethical Dilemmas has been the occasion for much discussion concerning the use of artificial feeding tubes for nutrition...
Informed Consent from the Doctor?
Dan is at the hospital bedside of his 13-year-old son, Rob, who was admitted the previous night with severe breathing difficulties. Rob is heavily sedated but conscious. Dan has been told that his son may have cancer; tests done during the night showed...
In Memoriam: John C. Fletcher
John C. Fletcher, who died May 27, 2004, was a pioneer in bioethics. In 1967, while pursuing his doctorate at Union Theological Seminary on the ethics of clinical research, he published an article on "Human Experimentation: Ethics in the Consent Situation"...
Liability for Life
Marshall Klavan headed the Obstetrics and Gynecology Department of the Crozer-Chester Medical Center. (1) He deeply feared strokes, perhaps because his father had been savaged by one. In 1993, Dr. Klavan wrote an advance directive which said that (as...
Manufacturing Consensus
Readers opening any issue of any major medical journal are likely to see both glossy drug advertisements and staid reports on clinical trials. There might seem to be an obvious problem here--too many adverts leading physicians astray--with an equally...
Paradoxes and Political Problems: The U.S. Approach to ART as Seen from the U.K
Viewed from a country where the development and application of new assisted reproductive technoloies (ART) are primarily regulated by a single statutory body, the U.S. approach seems some thing of a patchwork. A complex mix of federal, state, indirect...
Something Old and Something New
The President's Council on Bioethics has explored a range of reproductive technologies over the last two years. It has now issued its findings and recommendations in a new report, Reproduction & Responsibility: The Regulation of New Biotechnologies....
The Contribution of Demoralization to End of Life Decisionmaking
Some psychiatrists believe that "demoralization syndrome" is a diagnosable cognitive disorder characterized in its extreme form by morbid existential distress. If they are right, then it should be an important part of our thinking about end of life...
The Other Side of the Slippery Slope
Much of the suffering in the dying and their families does not fit into the usual categories of mental disease, and palliative care mental health researchers are now examining formulations that integrate psychological, spiritual, and relational domains....
Uncharitable Care?
Richard Scruggs and other veterans of class action lawsuits against the nations tobacco companies have found their next target: non-profit hospitals. On June 16, 2004, the team filed separate class action lawsuits against thirteen health systems or...
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