The Hastings Center Report

The Hastings Center Report is a bimonthly magazine addressing ethical issues in medicine and the life sciences for an audience of physicians and other health care practitioners, attorneys and professionals in business and academia. Founded in Feb. of 1971, The Hastings Center publishes this magazine. Subjects for the Hastings Center Report are medicine and surgery. The Managing Editor is Joyce Griffin. Gregory E. Kaebnick is the Editor.

Articles from Vol. 34, No. 3, May-June

A Fifteen-Year-Old Translator
Mr. C is a fifty-eight-year-old Chinese immigrant. Late one Tuesday night he comes to the emergency room of a busy urban hospital complaining of severe chest and arm pain. The ER staff determine that he should be admitted to the cardiac unit for a...
A Tale of Two Conversations
Patient "J," let's call her Jane, was in the ICU of her local hospital. She was seventy-five and suffering from end stage pulmonary disease, high blood pressure, and impending renal failure. She had an eighty-year-old husband and two children in their...
Canada Bans Human Cloning
On March 29, 2004, with the passing of the Assisted Human Reproduction Act, Canada joined other Western countries that legislate assisted human reproduction. The AHR Act includes prohibitions against, for example, human cloning, the creation of in...
Do as I Say, Not as I Do: Why Bioethecists Should Seek Informed Consent for Some Case Studies
In 1993, The British Journal of Psychiatry published a medical case study that resulted in a disciplinary hearing against the authors who had submitted it for publication. While the relationship between eating disorders and self-mutilation is well...
Fair Benefits in International Medical Research
When researchers from wealthy countries study health and disease in poverty-stricken parts of the world, what do they owe, if anything, to the people who participate in their trials? (1) This question generated a vigorous debate in the medical and...
Field Notes
Local Knowledge in Hospice and Palliative Care. It is often difficult to explain what The Hastings Center means by "research." It is more than time spent studying a topic in the library--or nowadays, increasingly, on the World Wide Web--and more than...
Just Visiting
He had been in the hospital for two weeks and had been almost ready to go home. Then he had a big GI bleed and developed aspiration pneumonia. So he went to the ICU, was put on oxygen, had a fever, and was draining "coffee ground" stuff out of the...
Monitoring and Manipulating Brain Function: New Neuroscience Technologies and Their Ethical Implications
Congress christened the 1990s "the decade of the brain," and this was apt from the vantage point of the early 21st Century. Great strides were made in both basic and clinical neuroscience. What the current decade may, in retrospect, be remembered for...
Moral Standards for Research in Developing Countries: From "Reasonable Availability" to "Fair Benefits"
Over the last decade, clinical research conducted by sponsors and researchers from developed countries in developing countries has grown very controversial. (1) The perinatal HIV transmission studies that were sponsored by the National Institutes of...
On Learning Humility: A Thirty-Year Journey
When I returned to Johns Hopkins as an associate professor in 1969, the physician's role was quite paternalistic. The concept of informed consent was just beginning to enter the patient-physician relationship, and the idea of shared decisionmaking...
Schiavo: A Hard Case Makes Questionable Law
Since the 1970s Quinlan case, decisions about life-sustaining interventions have been a major focus of bioethics inquiry. By the end of the 1990s, however, professionals and the general public were paying less attention to this topic. After the U.S....
The Cases Philosophers Have Dreamt Of
In the Field Notes at the very front of this issue, my colleague Bruce Jennings describes the "double agency" he sought to cultivate in himself during his research on hospice and palliative care. On the one hand, in order to really understand hospice...